Ruth Wilson Talks Mysterious ‘Affair’ Exit: ‘I Didn’t Feel Safe’

first_img– Advertisement – Wilson exited the show at the end of season 4 when her character was killed off. She later revealed that she was “not allowed to talk about why” she left.Ruth Wilson Opens Up About Her Mysterious Exit From The AffairRuth Wilson as Alison in ‘The Affair.’ Mark Schafer/SHOWTIME“What’s important to say is that I did speak up. I did have a voice. I did stand up for myself. There was a situation on The Affair where things didn’t feel right, and I dealt with them, and I managed to protect myself,” the Dark Materials star explained. “It was before #MeToo and before Harvey Weinstein — and yet my instincts were very clear and strong about what I felt was wrong, about what was going on, and what I didn’t feel safe about.”The mystery around the exit was clarified a bit in December 2019, when The Hollywood Reporter published a report in which many claimed she had friction with the show’s creator, Sarah Treem, had problems with the nudity on the show and felt there was a “hostile work environment” after an incident with Girls producer Jenni Konner, Lena Dunham and Affair producer Jeffrey Reiner.- Advertisement – Doing what’s right. It’s been two years since Ruth Wilson‘s exit played out on The Affair, but the mystery around the exit still remains.“The reason I haven’t gone into The Affair is that I haven’t worked out how to discuss it. There’s a lot of noise and anger surrounding it, and really the power rests with me to choose how I discuss my life and my experiences,” the actress, 38, explained during an interview with Stylist magazine, published on Tuesday, November 3.- Advertisement – The incident reportedly occurred in 2016 when the producer showed a photo of a nude Maura Tierney and a nude male actor working as a body double. A blind item was posted about the incident by Konner.Ruth Wilson Opens Up About Her Mysterious Exit From The AffairRuth Wilson as Alison and Dominic West as Noah in ‘The Affair.’ Mark Schafer/SHOWTIMEIn an open letter to Deadline, Treem claimed that after the blind item was posted, she “urged Showtime to do something” and said she wanted to “shut down production, do sensitivity training, address the cast and crew and apologize for what had occurred.” However, that didn’t happen.“Instead, I was told to stick to certain talking points and let the network handle the response,” she claimed. “By the time the third season was over, Showtime executives told me to write Ruth out of the show.”- Advertisement – Shortly after Wilson’s exit, star Joshua Jackson also chose to leave the show. Dominic West and Tierney remained on the show for its final season in 2019.Showtime did not comment on the claims.Listen to Watch With Us to hear more about your favorite shows and for the latest TV news!last_img read more

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Ludogorets 1 – 3 Tottenham

first_img– Advertisement – Player ratingsTottenham: Hart (7), Doherty (7), Alderweireld (7), Dier (7), Davies (7), Winks (7), Sissoko (7), Lo Celso (8), Bale (7), Lucas (8), Kane (8)Subs: Vinicius (5), Son (8), Ndombele (6), Hojbjerg (7), Bergwijn (6)- Advertisement – Man of the Match: Giovani Lo Celsolast_img

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Airtel Adds Over 10 Lakh More Subscribers Than Reliance Jio in August: TRAI

first_imgtrai august TRAI August DataVodafone Idea lost many subscribers in AugustPhoto Credit: TRAIWhen compared to its performance in July, Airtel also saw a decline in subscriber additions from 32.60 lakhs to 28.99 lakhs in the month of August. However, it is significantly more than Jio’s performance in August. To be precise, Airtel added 10.35 lakh more subscribers than Jio in this month.- Advertisement – Vi (Vodafone Idea) lost about 12.28 lakh subscribers, a lot less than the 37.26 lakh subscribers lost in the month of July. BSNL made a modest gain of 2.14 lakh subscribers in the month of August. Airtel saw a monthly growth rate of 0.91 percent in wireless subscribers, whereas Jio lagged behind with a growth rate of 0.47 percent. According to TRAI, Kolkata and Himachal Pradesh regions showed maximum growth of 1.13 percent in its wireless subscriber base during the month of August.Coming to broadband, TRAI report reveals that BSNL stood at 78.5 lakh subscribers at the end of August. Bharti Airtel came in second with 25.3 lakh subscribers, Atria Convergence followed with 17 lakh subscribers, and Jio sat with 12.5 lakh subscribers. In the wireless broadband category, Jio was at the top with 40.267 crores subscribers, Airtel was at 15.465 crore subscribers, Vi (Vodafone Idea) was at 11.991 crore subscribers, and BSNL was at 159 lakh subscribers.Which is the best TV under Rs. 25,000? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below.- Advertisement – Airtel managed to add more subscribers than Jio in the month of August 2020, the latest report from Telecom Regulatory Authority of India’s (TRAI) suggests. Airtel added 28.99 lakh subscribers, whereas Jio remained significantly behind with 18.64 lakh subscriber additions. Vi (Vodafone Idea) continued to lose subscribers with a decline of 12.28 lakh in the month of August. Reliance Jio enjoyed the largest share in the wireless telecom market with 35.08 percent market share and Airtel came in second with 28.12 percent market share.TRAI’s latest report for the month ending August 31 revealed that total wireless subscribers increased from 114.418 crores at the end of July to 114.792 crores at the end of August, thereby registering a monthly growth rate of 0.33 percent. Reliance Jio’s subscriber additions significantly reduced in August, when compared to July, and it went down from 35.54 lakhs to 18.64 lakhs, respectively.- Advertisement –center_img – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Megan Rapinoe: Man Utd skipper Katie Zelem defends team after comments by US midfielder | Football News

first_img– Advertisement – They currently lead the table after six games in the current campaign after Sunday’s 1-0 win over Arsenal.Several American internationals have joined the WSL with Tobin Heath and Christen Press joining United.Manchester City signed Rose Lavelle and Sam Mewis, while superstar Alex Morgan secured a loan move to Tottenham. Manchester United Women players Katie Zelem (l) and Alessia RussoImage:Manchester United stars Zelem and Alessia Russo have helped steer the team to the top of the WSL “Manchester United have already had a plan and strategy and now it’s really coming into place and you can see how well we’ve done year on year from promotion to last year and to where we are now.“As a club and a player, you just want to keep building on that platform and hopefully Manchester United will be the top of Europe one day.” Concerning United, who scrapped their team in 2005 and started again in the second-tier Championship in 2018, Rapinoe told the BBC: “It’s 2020. How long has the Premier League been around? And we’re only just seeing a club like Manchester United put effort and pounds towards a women’s team? Frankly, it’s disgraceful.”Speaking ahead of this weekend’s WSL clash with neighbours City, Manchester United skipper Zelem told Sky Sports News: “Everyone is entitled to their own opinion but you can see how great the club are doing now.“We are currently sitting top (of the WSL) which has maybe surpassed our own expectations as well.- Advertisement – After joining the second tier two years ago, United were promoted to the Women’s Super League (WSL) and finished fourth in their maiden top-flight campaign.- Advertisement – Katie Zelem has fired back at Megan Rapinoe after the two-time World Cup winner called Man Utd ‘disgraceful’ for taking so long to set up a women’s team.Rapinoe, the 2019 Ballon d’Or winner, revealed her frustrations on Tuesday at the lack of investment in the women’s game around the world.- Advertisement –last_img read more

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Everything the Cast Has Said About HBO Max Special

first_imgThe reunion will include all six cast members, Jennifer Aniston, Courteney Cox, Lisa Kudrow, Matthew Perry, David Schwimmer and Matt LeBlanc, as well as Kauffman, 63, and cocreator David Krane. This will be the first time the entire cast is back together on screen since the show wrapped. The special is still set to film on Stage 24 of the Warner Bros. Studio lot in Burbank, the same stage the sitcom was filmed for 10 years.“Guess you could call this ‘The One Where They Get Back Together,’” HBO Max’s chief content officer Kevin Reilly said in a statement in February. “I became aware of Friends when it was in the very early stages of development and then had the opportunity to work on the series many years later and have delighted in seeing it catch on with viewers generation after generation.”The show, which consisted of 236 episodes between its 1994 premiere and 2004 finale, has become one of the most popular sitcoms of all time. The comedy was nominated for 62 Primetime Emmy Awards (four wins), 10 Golden Globe Awards (one win), 14 Screen Actors Guild Awards (two wins) and 11 People’s Choice Awards (11 wins).- Advertisement – They were on a break — but it will soon be over. The highly anticipated Friends reunion special, which was originally set to be released in May when HBO Max debuted, has been delayed due to the coronavirus pandemic. However, the cast seems to be just as excited about stepping onto the stage together as the fans are.“We are hoping to be able to shoot in August if all is well and there is no early second wave and the studio is open,” cocreator Marta Kauffman told The Wrap in June. However, in August, the streamer delayed the production again, pushing filming back to the fall at the earliest.- Advertisement – Although many details about the special have yet to be announced, the cast has spoken out about it many times since the news broke. Scroll through the gallery below to see everything they’ve said about the upcoming special.center_img – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Questions raised about Vietnam’s avian flu reports and testing

first_imgMar 4, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Vietnam, the country at the center of this year’s avian influenza activity, may have two problems with its data on human cases: transparency in reporting and accuracy in testing.The country has lapsed in its reporting of cases to the World Health Organization (WHO). More than a month passed without official reporting of cases, despite widespread media reports of several new cases, according to a story by the Canadian Press (CP) on Mar 1.Ongoing monitoring by CIDRAP News also shows substantial discrepancies between official and unofficial numbers (see Case Count tables).Because the WHO relies on official reports for its case counts and as the basis for advice to member countries, the lack of reporting has an impact, Dr. Klaus Stohr, director of the WHO’s global influenza program, told the CP.”The situation is that WHO has a request by its member states to provide proper risk assessment, to help other member states of WHO . . . in assessing what’s going on in Asia and provide advice to other member states. And without this information, this is very difficult,” Stohr said.WHO officials had requested reports in person and in writing, the CP story noted. Those efforts appeared to be paying off on Mar 2, when Dick Thompson, communications officer in the Communicable Diseases Section of WHO in Geneva, told CIDRAP News by e-mail, “We understand that there is some movement and we will have an update shortly.”Vietnam is not the only country with reporting shortcomings. Indonesian farmers tallied more than 33,000 poultry deaths from avian flu during the past 2 months, the Jakarta Post reported today. Indonesia has not reported any new outbreaks to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) in several months.Reporting can trigger difficult consequences. “Many countries find it difficult to report outbreaks of contagious diseases. These can impact trade and tourism, or it can injure their international standing or self-image,” Thompson wrote.The pattern of cases in Vietnam has not changed recently. Thompson commented, “The press reports suggest that the missing cases are sporadic. This would be a serious public health issue if there were a cluster of cases—that is not 15 isolated cases ranging over several weeks, but a single cluster of 15 cases, from one area, among casual contacts and health care workers. That doesn’t seem to be the case in Viet Nam.”He criticized developed nations: “These are nations which can afford to help countries like Viet Nam. Right now, these Asian countries are sustaining enormous hits to their economies in the effort to fight [avian] flu. If they are successful, every nation will benefit by not having to confront a pandemic. Therefore, we believe that those nations which share the benefits of this fight should . . . help [poorer] countries which are largely managing on their own.”Reporting issues aside, Vietnam may face another hurdle in coping with avian flu: re-analysis of samples showed that some Vietnamese who had flulike symptoms but tested negative for H5N1 in Vietnam actually had the virus. The findings, which cast doubt on the sensitivity of Vietnam’s H5N1 test, were described in a Feb 24 news story in Nature.According to the story, samples from 11 recent avian flu case-patients in Vietnam, as well as samples from 90 patients who had suspected cases but tested negative for H5N1, were sent to the National Institute of Infectious Diseases in Tokyo. About a third of the samples had been tested there so far. Of those, seven that had tested negative in Vietnam were found to be positive, said Phan Van Tu, head of the microbiology and immunology department at the Pasteur Institute in Ho Chi Minh City.Retesting in Vietnam then confirmed four of the seven positive results.Tu said one reason for the discrepancy was that reagents in the original tests weren’t mixed well and yielded unclear results. He added that the institute would use the more sensitive test that was used in Tokyo and improve technician training, according to the story.last_img read more

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FDA approves first H5N1 vaccine

first_imgApr 17, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today approved the nation’s first H5N1 influenza vaccine, made by Sanofi Pasteur, which federal officials hope will buy some time to develop a more precisely targeted vaccine if the virus evolves into a pandemic strain.The vaccine will not be sold commercially but is being produced by Sanofi for the Strategic National Stockpile of drugs and medical supplies, according to an FDA press release.”The threat of an influenza pandemic is, at present, one of the most significant public health issues our nation faces,” FDA Commissioner Andrew C. von Eschenbach, MD, said in the press release. “The approval of this vaccine is an important step forward in our protection against a pandemic.”If the H5N1 flu virus gains the ability to spread efficiently from person to person, potentially triggering a pandemic, “the vaccine may provide early limited protection in the months before a vaccine tailored to the pandemic strain of the virus could be developed and produced,” the FDA statement said.The FDA said the vaccine is indicated for people aged 18 to 64 who could be at risk for exposure to the H5N1 strain targeted by the vaccine. The vaccine, to be distributed by public health officials if needed, is made at Sanofi’s facility in Swiftwater, Pa.The vaccine is based on an H5N1 virus isolated from a Vietnamese patient in 2004. Today’s approval by the FDA follows a Feb 27 recommendation by an FDA advisory panel, which found that the vaccine was safe and effective. However, some of the panel members had reservations about the immunogenicity of the vaccine, which in data submitted to the panel was somewhat lower than previously reported in a 2006 article in the New England Journal of Medicine.In a clinical trial, two 90-microgram (mcg) doses of the vaccine, administered to 103 healthy adults 28 days apart, generated a protective immune response in 45% of recipients, the FDA noted. (The researchers used a neutralizing antibody titer of 1:40, a fourfold or more increase in antibody titer, to define adequate immune response.) The 45% response rate was lower than the 54% rate reported almost a year ago in the NEJM report, which was based on interim findings. Recipients who received smaller doses of the vaccine were less likely to show a good immune response.Norman Baylor, director of FDA’s vaccine office, told the Associated Press today that though the newly approved H5N1 vaccine isn’t ideal for quickly responding to a pandemic, others that employ dose-sparing technologies are under development. “At this point, this is where we are,” he said.Disease experts have expressed concern about the large dose the vaccine requires, in the face of the world’s very limited vaccine production capacity. The two-dose course (180 mcg) used in the study is 12 times the standard 15-mcg dose used for each flu strain in the seasonal flu vaccine. If the world’s entire flu vaccine production capacity for trivalent vaccine, which currently stands at about 350 million doses annually, were devoted solely to making the new H5N1 vaccine, it would yield enough for only a tiny percentage of the world’s population, experts have said.HHS, in its most recent pandemic preparedness update, acknowledged some of the H5N1 vaccine’s limitations. “It is, for now, the best vaccine defense we have, and so we are stockpiling it,” the agency said in the Nov 2006 update.The national stockpile currently contains 13 million doses of the H5N1 vaccine, enough to vaccinate 6.5 million people, Holly Babin, an HHS spokeswoman in Washington, DC, told CIDRAP News today.HHS has a goal of acquiring enough H5N1 vaccine for 20 million people, but the agency may not necessarily need 40 million doses to achieve that, Babin said. “We’re looking at adjuvants [immune-boosting chemicals] and other ways to stretch the vaccine” so that fewer doses will be needed, she said.Pharmaceutical companies are working on various other H5N1 vaccines and vaccines targeting other flu strains considered to have pandemic potential. Some of these involve producing vaccines in cell culture, a method expected to be somewhat faster than the established practice of growing vaccines in chicken eggs. With egg-based technology it takes about 6 months to produce a vaccine in quantity.HHS has said it is moving forward with the development of a “clade 2” H5N1 vaccine, based on viruses that circulated in birds in China and Indonesia in 2003-04 and spread to the Middle East, Europe, and Africa in 2005 and 2006See also:Apr 17 FDA press releasehttp://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/2007/ucm108892.htmFeb 27 CIDRAP News story “FDA panel supports H5N1 vaccine approval”Mar 30, 2006, CIDRAP News article “H5N1 vaccine trial shows limited benefit”Treanor JJ, Campbell JD, Zangwill KM, et al. Safety and immunogenicity of an inactivated subvirion influenza A (H5N1) vaccine. N Engl J Med 2006 Mar 30;354(13):1343-51 [Full text]November 2006 HHS pandemic planning updatehttp://www.flu.gov/professional/pdf/panflureport3.pdflast_img read more

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Is H5N1 still a threat? What to do when your pandemic preparedness work is challenged

first_img(CIDRAP Source Osterholm Briefing) – How are you explaining the current risk of an H5N1-related influenza pandemic to your boss, the emergency preparedness committee, or the executive suite today? Is the task daunting? Are you being waved off with the comment that all this attention to pandemic preparedness is just public health’s version of Y2K?If so, you are not alone. After all, while sporadic human cases and bird-related outbreaks continue, the last worrisome cluster of human cases emerged more than a year ago. And the much-anticipated trigger that would launch many pandemic plans—sustained human-to-human transmission of the deadly H5N1 strain of influenza—has yet to occur. Maybe you are even questioning whether this current level of bird and human virus activity is the “new normal.” Perhaps you’re wondering if you can relax your preparedness efforts a bit.The answer is absolutely not. The risk of H5N1 causing a pandemic remains very real. Yet no one with a credible understanding of influenza virology can put odds on that risk. Given that quandary, what are responsible planners supposed to say and do? Let me see if I can offer help.Companies built to last take the long viewWe routinely plan for disasters that we can anticipate but for which we are unable to predict the exact time or place. Ten pandemics have been documented in the last 300 years, and we know more will happen in the future. So why has the much-watched H5N1 virus suddenly fallen off the radar screen?Ten years ago in May, H5N1 claimed its first human victim in Hong Kong. Public health authorities documented what they considered an apparent isolated case of human H5N1 infection. Later that year, an outbreak of H5N1 in domestic waterfowl sold in Hong Kong markets resulted in another human outbreak. By November 1997, 18 human cases of H5N1 infection, with six deaths, were documented. Sustained person-to-person transmission did not occur, and the outbreak stopped when all birds in the Hong Kong commercial poultry industry (about 1.4 million) were slaughtered.With a backdrop of international news coverage, some public health and animal health officials claimed that the prompt and unprecedented avian control efforts likely averted the next influenza pandemic. This event and such statements likely “set up” an expectation that H5N1 could cause the next pandemic. The public felt that if we didn’t control the threat at that moment, a pandemic would begin. Then everyone felt relief, which led to the sense that we could quash the threat.But H5N1 resurged in Asia in the fall of 2003 and spread in domestic poultry farms at an historically unprecedented rate. Human cases with bird contact followed. Obviously, the success claimed in eradicating the virus as a future pandemic risk was premature. The 2003 outbreak tapered off in spring 2004, but in summer it reemerged in several Asian countries (including Cambodia, China, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam), where the virus continues to infect and kill people.But because sustained human-to-human transmission has yet to happen, we see much of the public and many preparedness officials confused about the risk. Unfortunately, many seem to believe that, like a severe weather warning that ends without incident, the risk of H5N1 causing another pandemic will pass with time. Companies built to last won’t be fooled by such short-sightedness.Why you should keep watching H5N1The H5N1 strains currently causing outbreaks across Asia and elsewhere are genetically distinct from the strain isolated from humans in Hong Kong in 1997. The virus continues to produce a virtual kaleidoscope of new strains. And that’s dangerous.Leading influenza experts who gathered in Toronto last week at the International Conference on Options for the Control of Influenza offered some sobering observations:Southeast Asia, the area from which the virus began spreading in late 2003, has seen multiple H5N1 bird outbreaks just in the past month, along with Vietnam’s first human death in 2 years, noted Dr. Watanee Kalpravidh of the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization. “Freedom from infection has not been sustained in the region,” she said. “There has been a recurrence of cases in most of the affected countries, with some countries having continuing outbreaks. The virus may be endemic in some countries.”Dr. Ian Brown of the British government’s Veterinary Laboratory Agency noted that in Europe and the Russian Federation, “the reemergence of the virus in a number of countries does suggest we are moving toward endemicity,” even though some countries have deployed vaccinations against the disease.The apparent endemic threat means that every day this virus is replicating, and with each reproduction of itself, such viral activity leads to another chance for a critical pandemic-related genetic mutation.Remember H3N8I would also remind every pandemic preparedness planner never to forget our experience with the H3N8 influenza virus. What the heck is H3N8, you may ask?This strain of avian influenza virus emerged as an important cause of illness in horses in the early 1960s. No one understands from either a genetic or transmission standpoint why it jumped from birds to horses. Then, after more than 40 years of ongoing transmission in horses, this virus was suddenly able to infect dogs. Initially the infection only occurred in racing greyhounds, a breed of dogs that has close contact with race horses.Since 2004 when the first isolated cases of greyhound infections were documented, H3N8 has become widespread in pet dogs throughout the United States. No one can provide a clear explanation why this new disease problem has occurred except to say some unexplained changes along the bird-to-horse, horse-to-dog transmission road took place.Such a phenomenon very well could be a model of bird-to-human transmission of H5N1. A critical genetic change that results in a human pandemic strain might occur today, tomorrow, or even 10 years from now. Maybe it will never occur. But we can never rule out that one day an unexpected genetic change will take place in the widely circulating H5N1 virus that will suddenly change the potential for H5N1 to be transmitted by and between humans.The bottom line for businessAnother influenza pandemic will occur one day in the future—we just don’t know when. As one of my colleagues has said: “The pandemic clock is ticking; we just don’t know what time it is.” So, no, of course we don’t have a public health Y2K. How could we? We don’t have a clue when the next pandemic’s “Jan 1, 2000” will be. And I sure wouldn’t want to bet my family’s life on H5N1 not becoming the next pandemic strain—the unknowns are too many, while the knowns are abundant enough to raise alarms. When you find yourself challenged by myopic colleagues about the waning risk of an H5N1 pandemic, cite the H3N8 example.I don’t know if H5N1 will cause the next pandemic. It might. It might not. What I do know is that some strain of influenza will cause a pandemic. If you expect the unexpected—just as you would with any disaster—you and your company will be far better off.—Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH, Director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research & Policy (CIDRAP), Editor-in-Chief of the CIDRAP Business Source, Professor in the School of Public Health, and Adjunct Professor in the Medical School, University of Minnesota.last_img read more

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Possible H5N1 family cluster probed in Pakistan

first_imgDec 17, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – The World Health Organization (WHO) has sent a team to Pakistan to investigate at least eight suspected human cases of H5N1 avian influenza in the same general area, including cases in four brothers and two of their cousins, according to news services.WHO spokesman Gregory Hartl said limited human-to-human transmission in the cases is possible, according to an Associated Press (AP) report published yesterday. However, he told Nature that 40 contacts of the suspected case-patients have tested negative.If confirmed, the cases will mark the first human H5N1 infections in Pakistan. They also appear to constitute the largest cluster of related infections since eight cases (seven confirmed, one probable) occurred among relatives in North Sumatra in May 2006. Transmission of the disease from a 10-year-old boy to his father was confirmed by laboratory testing in that episode.In a Dec 15 statement, the WHO said Pakistan’s ministry of health had reported eight suspected cases in the Peshawar area, in the wake of culling operations to control poultry outbreaks there. Peshawar is in the country’s North-West Frontier province, near the Afghan border, where most of the country’s poultry outbreaks have occurred.Samples from the patients tested positive in Pakistan’s national laboratory and were being sent to a WHO reference lab for confirmation and further analysis, the WHO said.Doctors from the WHO in Geneva and Cairo and others from US Navy Medical Research Unit 3 in Cairo were on their way to Pakistan yesterday to help investigate the cases and combat the disease, according to a Dec 16 Bloomberg news report. The team planned to track down, treat, and test contacts of the suspected case-patients, according to the Nature report.Details of the suspected cases remained somewhat hazy today, as news reports varied in some respects.According to the AP, Hartl said the illnesses involved four brothers, two of whom died, and two cousins, all from Abbotabad, a city about 30 miles north of Islamabad. Specimens were never collected from one of the deceased brothers. The two men who died had been students at an agricultural college in Peshawar; they were not involved in culling poultry, but they visited another brother when he was hospitalized, the story said.Also among the suspected cases were a man and his niece from the Abbotabad area and a person who slaughtered poultry in Mansehra, 15 miles away, Hartl told the AP. He said some of the patients had had only mild symptoms and were never hospitalized.The Bloomberg News report, also based on information from Hartl, concurred that the suspected case-patients included four brothers. The first case was in an agriculture official who fell ill after culling poultry in the Abbotabad area in late October. He was cared for by two of his brothers, both of whom subsequently died, one about a month ago and the other on Nov 29. A third brother of the first man also got sick, was hospitalized, and recovered, the story said.The suspected cases also included two of the four brothers’ cousins, who had only mild symptoms, plus a man and his niece who were involved in culling poultry in the area, Bloomberg reported. (It was not clear if the cousins were involved in culling.) Another case was in a male farm worker from Mansehra.Still another brother of the first man to fall ill lives in New York state but flew to Pakistan to attend the funeral of one of his deceased brothers, according to Bloomberg. On his return, he told his physician that he might have been exposed to avian flu and quarantined himself at home, after which his son experienced flu-like symptoms. Samples from both father and son tested negative in state and federal laboratories last week, the story said.Hartl told Bloomberg it was too early to tell whether the cases all spread from birds or involved limited person-to-person spread. He said some of the patients kept chickens and quail, and it was unclear what kind of protective equipment they used during culling.The Nature report said Pakistan was slow to inform the WHO of the possible cases, boding ill for the agency’s hope of detecting any person-to-person transmission early and quickly providing antiviral treatment to stop a potential pandemic. The story said the first cases occurred in mid-November at the latest, but Pakistan didn’t officially inform the WHO until Dec 12.See also: Dec 15 WHO statementhttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2007_12_15/en/index.htmlJun 23, 2006, CIDRAP News story on human-to-human transmission in North Sumatra caseshttp://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/influenza/panflu/news/jun2306cluster.htmllast_img read more

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In May, there was an increase in passenger traffic at airports

first_imgThe total passenger traffic at airports in May 2017 amounted to 897 thousand, which is an increase of 2016% compared to May 770, when passenger traffic amounted to 16,4 thousand. data from the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS) speak for themselves.In May 2017, the growth of passenger traffic compared to May 2016 was recorded by Zagreb Airport (8,3%), Split Airport (25,9%), Dubrovnik Airport (19,5%), Zadar Airport (1,0, 37,4%), Pula Airport (1,9%), Osijek Airport (58,3%) and Brač Airport (11,9%), and a decrease was recorded in Rijeka Airport (40,6%) and the airport Mali Lošinj (XNUMX%).Half of the passengers in international traffic were realized in the traffic with the airports of Germany, the United Kingdom and France, and they show an increase compared to the previous year. The total number of aircraft landings and take-offs at airports in May 2017 was 11, which is an increase of 471% compared to 10 landings and take-offs in May 734.last_img read more

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