SME Gets New Tidal Licence in Canada

first_imgNova Scotia Department of Energy and Mines has issued a licence to Sustainable Marine Energy (SME) Canada for a tidal electricity project.The 1.26-megawatt marine renewable energy licence allows the company to continue to develop its project in a berth at the Fundy Ocean Research Centre for Energy (FORCE).“Tidal energy is about more than clean, renewable electricity,” said Energy and Mines Minister Derek Mombourquette. “This developing industry has the potential to create green jobs in rural areas of the province and it’s good to see one of our developers taking its project to the next level.”Sustainable Marine Energy also has an unconnected marine renewable energy permit for a 280-kilowatt floating platform in Grand Passage, Digby Co.Under the licence, the company must meet performance standards, environmental requirements and community engagement conditions.The project is required to obtain all other necessary approvals, permits and authorizations.This licence allows the company to sell electricity generated at a rate set by the Utility and Review Board of 53 cents per kilowatt hour.last_img read more

Read More

Ampelmann Ups Offshore Lifting Game

first_imgAmpelmann has revealed a new access system that is said to be capable of transferring personnel and cargo of up to 5 tons.Source: AmpelmannThe E5000, with its full motion compensation, will be able to operate in high sea states, extending the weather window of operations, Ampelmann said.According to the Dutch company, the switch between people and cargo mode takes less than a minute and just one push of a button, which turns vessels into an all-round offshore tool resulting in shorter campaign durations, increased logistical efficiency and a broader scope of work.The system is based on the technology of the E1000, which was launch in 2016. It is expected to be operational in the third quarter of 2020.“Building on the success of the E1000 and the specific needs of our clients, we recognised an opportunity to design and develop a system that can transfer people and lift up to 5 tons of cargo. That significantly broadens the possibilities of the offshore lifting scope compared to existing systems,” said Diederick Nierstrasz, Ampelmann’s Offshore Wind Business Unit Manager.“With the E1000, we launched a unique system on the market. As the market recognised its potential, clients requested more lifting capacity and we believe the E5000 can offer a compelling package for them to get the most out of their offshore campaigns.”last_img read more

Read More

Evergreen orders 1,800 Star Cool reefers from Maersk Container Industry

first_imgTaiwanese shipping company Evergreen Marine Corp. has ordered 1,800 Star Cool reefers from Maersk Container Industry (MCI) for its growing reefer operations. Prior to placing the order, Evergreen spent most of 2019 running live trials across their global network involving all relevant reefer machines. Scheduled for delivery during the 2nd quarter of 2020, reefer containers Star Cool Integrated combine the refrigerated MCI Box and the Star Cool refrigeration machine, featuring innovative technologies such as the controlled atmosphere. Maersk Container Industry said that the results of these extensive tests confirmed that Star Cool achieved the lowest energy consumption of all brands, the fastest temperature pulldown, and seamless customer service.center_img Star Cool CA enables careful monitoring and control of the amount of oxygen and carbon dioxide inside a reefer, enabling perishable produce to be transported further and over a longer time period. “Evergreen has spent over 50 years building a comprehensive shipping network that meets the needs of our customers, and which has help us achieve the scale of business we have today. When we began the process of selecting a new brand for our reefer fleet, we were looking for the ability to offer our customers the most reliable service as well as the documented lowest carbon footprint, which made Star Cool a clear choice,” the company commented.last_img read more

Read More

Triton Knoll foundations and export cables in place

first_imgAccording to project developer RWE, the installation of the 90 monopile foundations and two lengths of 50km export cable was completed this week. Seaway 7’s Seaway Strashnov and DEME’s Innovation were in charge of installing the foundations. Triton Knoll will comprise 90 MHI Vestas 9.5 MW turbines located 32 kilometers off the Lincolnshire coast. Commissioning is planned in 2021. Boskalis’ vessel Ndurance laid and buried both lengths of the 220kV cables, which link the two offshore substation platforms to the onshore electrical network. “We are delighted to have completed this phase of construction within the summer delivery window despite the impacts of Covid19. This is a great credit to all of our supply chain partners and everyone working in the Triton Knoll team,” said Project Director for Triton Knoll and RWE Renewables Julian Garnsey.center_img “We have made excellent progress on the project to date, and look forward to installation of the first offshore turbines in early 2021.” All turbine foundations and export cables have been installed at the Triton Knoll offshore wind farm in the UK. The project is jointly owned by RWE (59%), J-Power (25%) and Kansai Electric Power (16%).last_img read more

Read More

Parents take school board to court over transgender policy (Canada)

first_imgVancouver Sun 12 November 2014Three Vancouver parents are taking the Vancouver School Board to court in a bid to quash a controversial policy that provided more support for transgender students. Xiaofeng Huang, Yuen Ching Li and Shaohui Liu have filed a petition in B.C. Supreme Court claiming the school board policy, adopted June 16 in front of a deeply divided audience, violates the School Act and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.It said the policy, which allows transgender students to use washrooms and locker-rooms that correspond to their gender identities, violates students’ rights to privacy and encroaches on parental rights over their children.“Some students are uncomfortable with sharing very personal information or private spaces with members of the opposite sex and deeply care about their privacy when using the washroom or change room,” said the petition, filed Oct. 31.“The board never proposed how to accommodate the wishes of students who are uncomfortable with sharing the same washroom and change room with members of the opposite sex.”The policy also allows transgender students to be addressed by the name that corresponds with their gender identity.http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Parents+take+school+board+court+over+transgender+policy/10376113/story.htmllast_img read more

Read More

Pharmac bid to fund medical cannabis shut down by clinical advisors

first_imgNZ Doctor 16 November 2015Pharmac’s bid to fund a cannabis medication for multiple sclerosis has been declined by its advisory committee, in part because it says the risk of inappropriate use is too high.Pharmac has been seeking clinical advice from its Pharmacology Therapeutics Advisory Committee on funding oromucosal spray Sativex. The spray is a cannabis-extract treatment used for various indications, including spasticity due to multiple sclerosis.Sativex is currently the only approved cannabinoid treatment in New Zealand, but because it is unsubsidised, it costs patients around $1000 a month.Risk of diversion in the New Zealand settingBut the committee has recommended Pharmac declines national funding of Sativex for a number of conditions, including: spasticity due to multiple sclerosis, pain, and refractory epilepsy (epilepsy with prolonged seizures), according to the just-released minutes of its 13 to 14 August meeting.“The committee considered that the risk of diversion in the New Zealand setting, should Sativex be funded, is high due to the inherent nature of its active substances and the ease of administration.”Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.The dosing required will also vary between patients because of the variability in how the drug interacts in different people, for example how it is absorbed and distributed through the body, the committee says.The recommended dose is 12 sprays per day.No or limited effectIn its assessment, the committee reviewed a number of trials and studies on the use of cannabis extract for spasticity and noted either no, or limited, effect on these indications.One study required participants to take a maximum of 48 sprays a day – four times the usual recommended dose.“Overall, the committee considered that there was some evidence to support the use of Sativex for spasticity due to multiple sclerosis compared with placebo, but that the strength of this evidence was weak and the quality was poor.”The committee also believes there are already a number of funded treatments available for both spasticity and pain.http://www.nzdoctor.co.nz/news/2015/november-2015/16/pharmac-bid-to-fund-medical-cannabis-shut-down-by-clinical-advisors.aspxlast_img read more

Read More

Pupils not secluded, but put in a calming space, principals say

first_imgTimaru Herald 1 December 2016Family First Comment: So here’s the real facts – not the political or media spin…..“Highfield School principal Shayne Gallagher said the school had a “quiet space within a teaching space”, or a time out room, it used when pupils lost control. It would be “far more traumatic for police to see and take away [a student] than to sit in a quiet room”, Gallagher said. “We weren’t secluding them – we were putting them in a space to calm down.” The time out was the last resort for schools and pupils were debriefed and reintegrated back into class when they were calmer, he said.”South Canterbury principals say the proposal to ban seclusion in school may force them to call the police in extreme cases.Education Minister Hekia Parata proposed the practice of seclusion and seclusion rooms should be banned from schools.The Ministry of Education reported three South Canterbury schools – Waimate Main School, Highfield School and Timaru South School – have used seclusion in 2016, but have since ceased the practice.Highfield School principal Shayne Gallagher said the school had a “quiet space within a teaching space”, or a time out room, it used when pupils lost control.It would be “far more traumatic for police to see and take away [a student] than to sit in a quiet room”, Gallagher said.“We weren’t secluding them – we were putting them in a space to calm down.”READ MORE: http://www.stuff.co.nz/timaru-herald/news/87075228/pupils-not-secluded-but-put-in-a-calming-space-principals-sayKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

Read More

End of Life Choice Bill – 1st Reading – Chris Penk (National)

first_imgThank you, Mr Speaker. I rise to speak against this bill. At the heart of this bill is the question of choice, and yet we must all acknowledge that assisted suicide, or euthanasia, by whatever name we call it, is a choice to end all choices. It is, by definition, irreversible, the end; that it shares with any other form of suicide. As such, we should proceed exceedingly carefully before even considering whether safeguards, so-called, may mitigate some of the worst aspects of it.It is this nature of choice that is being promoted by those who have brought this bill to the House that we must attack. We must understand clearly the concepts of undue influence and coercion that undermine choice and that play on the minds of those who are vulnerable, and those who are vulnerable are the very ones who would be wanting to access this in that moment of time in their vulnerability.In their depression, people are vulnerable. To be depressed is literally to be pushed down. When one is pushed down, one is not capable of making good decisions. One is not capable of understanding fully the consequences of one’s actions, and yet this bill would allow people the ability to make, in that vulnerable state, in that vulnerable condition, a choice that would end all other choices.So many of our fellow New Zealanders, young and old, have already made that choice; they have no further choices left. It is a subject that this House rightly concerns itself with and should continue to do so. We must do more to discourage suicide and other forms of ending life prematurely, and not encourage more of it.Much has been said on the subject of dignity, too. Those in favour of the bill, at least to the first reading stage, have described a situation of a life that they say lacks dignity at that point. Disabled constituents of mine have said to me, “Do not let anyone tell you that certain conditions equate to a lack of dignity. They are describing my life.” They say to me, “This is my life. I am happy with it. I have dignity, and for anyone in the Parliament to suggest otherwise is, quite simply, intolerable.”We’ve heard about so-called safeguards; for example, the suggestion that one might be able to exercise this choice if one has a terminal illness. One might have a diagnosis of a terminal illness but not, in fact, have a terminal illness. One may have a mistaken diagnosis or, indeed, a mistaken prognosis, and one might make a decision based on that. And if that factual basis is proven to be incorrect, what recourse then does that person have? The answer is none, because the person will have died. Our criminal justice system admits the possibility of mistake as to facts and as to law. Among other reasons, this is why we do not have a law of capital punishment; mistakes are made. If anyone in this House doubts that, they should ask Mr Teina Pora if that is so. If we allow people to be pressured into making a choice or to make the choice seemingly of their own volition but based on a mistaken assumption as to facts, and if the facts, so-called, prove to be incorrect later, there is no recourse, there is not opportunity to turn back the clock. They are, at that point, dead.The intersection of our terrible rate of suicide in this country and our terrible record of elder abuse and neglect is this bill. There is much work we have to do in this Parliament on these subjects and, indeed, mental health in general. Will this bill encourage or undermine efforts to promote the real dignity, the real protection of life, the genuine role of the medical profession? I say, no; I say we reject it. And if you are in favour of euthanasia as a principle, I say to members of this House: this bill is not the one for you; it is far too broad. We should reject it.last_img read more

Read More

‘Airbnbrothel’ set up in suburban Dunedin home

first_imgOtago Daily Times 20 September 2019Family First Comment: But it’s legal – so it must be alright then?No, of course not!A sleepy North East Valley street became a seedy hotbed, Airbnb guests allegedly turning a man’s home into a busy brothel for two weeks.The Dunedin property owner and sole occupant, who requested anonymity, said he was on holiday in Asia for a month in July and August.His daughter helped him rent his home on Airbnb to two women, who were Chinese nationals, for 14 days.When he arrived back it “felt icky and stank of cheap perfumes”, a stock of 50 toilet rolls was gone and a few towels were missing.The owner earned $1770 from the guests, but a graph of his power usage shows it quadrupled in August, costing him more than $600 for the month. He also spent hundreds of dollars on cleaning and plumbing costs.The guests were not there long before the hot-water system broke.They contacted the owner’s daughter saying they were unable to have showers and she called a plumber.The plumber, who also did not want to be named, said it was “amazing” how they transformed it into a centre for sex services.“These girls had come down from Queenstown, travelling the country.“It was very obvious what was going on.”The women ran four phones, had a room each and operated through the night.One was in her 40s and the other was “lucky to be in her 20s”.READ MORE: https://www.odt.co.nz/news/dunedin/airbnbrothel-set-suburban-dunedin-homeKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

Read More

New Zealand’s largest-ever crime survey finds under-reporting, likely victims of crime

first_imgStuff co.nz 20 May 2020Family First Comment: The report found there was a clear link between victimisation and socio-economic conditions as people under financial pressure, living in more deprived areas, unemployed or not looking for employment and those in single parent households were likely to be targets of crime. “Victims are most likely to be aged between 19 to 29, Māori, never married, have moderate-to-high levels of psychological distress, lower life satisfaction ratings and lower feelings of safety.”New Zealand’s largest crime survey has painted a picture of likely victims of crime.Over the last year, 1,713,000 offences occurred — of those, 1,139,000 were personal offences and 574,000 were household offences, the Ministry of Justice survey said.While the level of crime was similar to last year’s report, sector deputy secretary Tim Hampton said there was nothing for New Zealand to be proud of.But the survey results were helping officials identify who were New Zealand’s likely victims of crime.The report found there was a clear link between victimisation and socio-economic conditions as people under financial pressure, living in more deprived areas, unemployed or not looking for employment and those in single parent households were likely to be targets of crime.“Victims are most likely to be aged between 19 to 29, Māori, never married, have moderate-to-high levels of psychological distress, lower life satisfaction ratings and lower feelings of safety.”READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/crime/121556520/new-zealands-largestever-crime-survey-finds-underreporting-likely-victims-of-crimeKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

Read More