Behind Carmelo and Amare the Knicks Beat Heat Avoid

Carmelo Anthony had 41 points.It had been a long time since New York Knicks fans could celebrate a playoff victory. They had an NBA postseason record of 13 straight losses spanning 11 years. So, excuse them for dropping streamers from the rafters of Madison Square Garden last night after they extended their first-round series against the Miami Heat.The 89-87 victory likely only postponed the inevitable; Miami still leads the series 3-1 and looks to close out the Knicks at home on Wednesday. But, for New York, it did not matter.“A great win for us, for our fans to finally get over that hump of those consecutive games that we lost. . . over those years in the playoffs,” said forward Amare Stoudemire, who returned after missing a game because of that much-talked-about left hand he cut after Game 2. He was a factor, too, with 20 points and 10 rebounds.But it was all-star Carmelo Anthony who was the catalyst, scoring 41 points in a rousing performance. Anthony made a tie-breaking 3-pointer with 54.5 seconds left. Still, it took a Dwyane Wade missed three-pointer as time expired to give NY some playoff life.LeBron James scored 27 for the Heat, including some spectacular late-game baskets, and Wade added 22.The Knicks’ win was marred by the gruesome injury to starting guard Baron Davis, who dislocated his right knee while running a fast break. He is out for the remainder of the playoffs. read more

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Why The Cavaliers Blew It All Up At The Trade Deadline

Welcome to The Lab, FiveThirtyEight’s basketball podcast. On this week’s show (Feb. 8, 2018), FiveThirtyEight editor-in-chief Nate Silver joins Neil, Chris and Kyle to help break down what happened at this year’s NBA trade deadline. The Cleveland Cavaliers shook up their roster Thursday by acquiring Jordan Clarkson, George Hill, Rodney Hood and Larry Nance Jr. and saying goodbye to Jae Crowder, Isaiah Thomas and Dwyane Wade, among others. The group also brings you a significant digit on the Knicks’ Kristaps Porzingis, another victim of this year’s seemingly never-ending stream of injuries.Here are links to what was discussed this week:ESPN’s Kevin Pelton assessed the winners and losers of the trade deadline.Kyle wrote about how the Cavaliers fixed some of their big problems — but will it be enough?FiveThirtyEight debated some hypothetical LeBron trades earlier in the week. Embed Code By Neil Paine, Chris Herring and Kyle Wagner More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed read more

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Ohio State baseball drops final two games of Snowbird Classic

OSU junior left-hander Tanner Tully (16) delivers a pitch against Coastal Carolina on Feb. 27. OSU won 6-4.Credit: Courtesy of OSUThe trip to Port Charlotte, Florida, ended up being a bummer for the Buckeyes after a promising start, as the Ohio State Baseball team dropped back-to-back games for the first time this season.OSU fell to the Illinois State Redbirds 5-4 on Saturday and the Boston College Eagles 6-2 on Sunday, dropping its record to 6-4-1. The losses came after the Scarlet and Gray started the weekend’s action on the right foot, defeating Seton Hall 9-3 behind another offensive explosion from redshirt junior right fielder Jacob Bosiokovic.  Dropping a close one to the RedbirdsOSU opened Saturday’s game against Illinois State with one of its top pitchers, redshirt sophomore Adam Niemeyer, on the hill. Niemeyer, however, got off to a shaky start, allowing three runs in the first two innings. The righty would get back to his normal self over the rest of his six innings of work, but the 3-0 hole the Buckeyes fell into would prove to be tough to climb out of. The Buckeyes battled back, tying the game in the bottom of the fifth inning behind junior catcher Jalen Washington’s double down the right-field line to score junior left fielder Ronnie Dawson. OSU fell behind again in the seventh, but the deficit was quickly erased by junior center fielder Troy Montgomery’s solo home run to tie the game at 4-4. The homer was Montgomery’s third of the season, which is second most on the team. But the Redbirds would not be denied their first win of the Snowbird Classic, as OSU contributed to its own demise allowing the game-winning run in the top of the ninth on a fielding error by senior second baseman Nick Sergakis. OSU’s co-captain also had his season-long nine-game hitting streak snapped following an 0-for-4 day at the plate. On the other hand, Washington, OSU’s other co-captain, had a career-best day at the plate, going 4-for-4 with two RBIs in the loss. Niemeyer received a no-decision in the game and freshman pitcher Ryan Feltner (0-1) was tagged with the loss for his 2.2 innings of work. Redshirt junior Jack Landwehr (1-1) picked up the win for Illinois State, which improved to 3-6. Dominated by Boston CollegeIn the final game of the three-game trip to the Sunshine State, the Buckeyes’ typically powerful offense was outmatched by Eagles senior starter Jesse Adams and the Boston College pitching staff. OSU’s bats were silenced, only mustering two hits all game against the Eagles and providing little run support for senior starter John Havird.Boston College’s offense was led by junior center fielder Michael Strem, who knocked in the Eagles’ first run as part of his 2-for-4, two-RBI day. Senior infielder Jake Palomaki provided the insurance runs for the Eagles with his sixth-inning double that plated two. The win moved Boston College’s record to 9-1 as Adams (2-0) picked up the win for his six innings of scoreless baseball. The Buckeyes fell to 6-4-1, and Havird was hit with his first loss and decision of the year. OSU now is set to return to Columbus to prepare for its four-game series with UNLV in Las Vegas starting on Friday and ending four days later on March 15. After that, the Buckeyes will gear up for their home-opening series against Hofstra from March 18 to 20. read more

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OSU snaps losing skid beats Big Tenleading Michigan State

Down a starting player and facing a top-10 nationally ranked opponent, the No. 24 Ohio State women’s basketball team (11-6, 2-3) snapped a two-game losing streak when it knocked off No. 9 Michigan State (16-2, 4-1), 67-53, Sunday at the Schottenstein Center. The Buckeyes took a 33-29 lead into halftime after playing a closely contested half with the Spartans in which neither team extended a lead past six points. Five minutes into the half, OSU found itself without starting forward Sarah Schulze, who left the game, suffering what appeared to be a knee injury. OSU coach Jim Foster said he was not sure of her diagnosis. “Doctors will have to talk to you about that,” he said. “I’m not very optimistic.” The Buckeyes ratcheted up their defense in the second half, holding the Spartans to 25 percent shooting as they stretched their lead to double digits on a Brittany Johnson 3-pointer with 17 minutes remaining. The Spartans struggled to fight back, as the Buckeyes led by as many as 17 points in the second half. For the game, MSU connected on 20 of its 69 shot attempts, good for a 29 percent shooting percentage. “We played really hard on defense,” OSU center Jantel Lavender said. “It just created a better offense. We could transition a little bit better to get in our sets, and we got them a little frustrated.” Lavender led all scorers with 24 points and Tayler Hill added 17 for a Buckeye team that was in much need of a win. Prior to Sunday’s game, OSU had lost six of its last nine games. “We were desperate for a win, by any means necessary,” Lavender said. “We know how we have to play from now on.” Sunday’s victory gave the Buckeyes their second conference win of the season and handed the Big Ten-leading Spartans their first conference loss of the year. The Buckeyes play at 8 p.m. Thursday at Illinois, where they’ll attempt to pick up their first road win of the Big Ten season. “I just really want us to get after it on the road and not let other people’s crowds get into the game,” Lavender said. “We just got to come out and play hard every game, like we did tonight. It can’t just be at home.” read more

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Ohio State mens hockey coach losing sleep over not starting Brady Hjelle

You know you’re doing something right as an athlete when your coach loses sleep over not starting you in a game. Ohio State senior goalie Brady Hjelle is doing things right as his coach has done the late night pacing to prove it. Hjelle has been honored as the Central Collegiate Hockey Association’s goaltender of the week for the second time this season after a two game series against Lake Superior State. “Brady (Hjelle) deserves it,” sophomore forward Ryan Dzingel said. “He is a hard worker that has produced at every level he has been at.” Hjelle said he is trying to staying focused despite the accolades. “I’m proud of it,” he said, “but it has nothing to do with our standing in the league. Right now points are more important than individual awards.” Hjelle has been superior in league play games, leading the CCHA in both goals-against average and save percentage. His GAA is .62 and his save percentage is .977. To put that in perspective, Hjelle is third in the NCAA in those two categories with an overall GAA of 1.14 and a save percentage of .961. If his overall numbers were the same as his league play statistics he would be leading nation in both categories. Hjelle started the first game against the Lake Superior State last weekend and gave up only one goal on 32 shots in an OSU win. However, coach Mark Osiecki elected not to start Hjelle in the second game of the series. He was attempting to get freshman goalie Collin Olson some experience and put some pressure on Hjelle to keep playing his best hockey. Rotating goaltenders is a philosophy the coaching staff has been using all season. In the second game against the Lakers, it backfired. Lake Superior State scored two goals against Olson in the first 15 minutes of the game, and then Osiecki put Hjelle in. OSU eventually lost 3-2. The decision to start Olson may or may not have cost the Buckeyes the game, but it definitely cost Osiecki some sleep. “I woke up at 4:55 in the morning, walking around the house going, ‘I should have played Brady (Hjelle),’” Osiecki said. While the team’s philosophy of alternating goalies currently has OSU in second place in the CCHA, a win in their last game would have put them in first. The Buckeyes trail the first place Miami Redhawks by a single point in the standings. Osiecki said that if Hjelle plays well in the first game against Michigan State, he may get to start the second as well. When Osiecki was asked if he had any experience with a goalie as hot as Hjelle is right now, his answer was simple. “Only in Xbox,” he said. read more

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Ohio State fans in awkward situation with Michigan in Final 4

With Ohio State’s basketball season coming to an unexpected end Saturday night in the Elite Eight matchup against Wichita State at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, many Buckeyes are still trying to get over it. Junior guard Aaron Craft said he’s going into the offseason with big expectations for next year. “It’s tough right now. It’s crazy to think I’m down to one year left,” Craft said after the game. “We have to understand there’s a sense of urgency now. Ohio State is one of the best places in the country to be and we need to make the most of it.” Just a year ago, OSU students and fans from all over the country were preparing their trips to New Orleans for the Final Four. Unfortunately this year’s team couldn’t make it back. The Buckeyes haven’t made consecutive Final Four appearances since the 1960s, when they went to the Final Four three straight years (1960-1962). The four teams that will be playing in the Final Four are No. 1-seed Louisville, No. 9-seed Wichita State, No. 4-seed Syracuse and No. 4-seed Michigan. Heading into the NCAA Tournament, some analysts, like former NBA superstar Charles Barkley, felt the Big Ten conference was overrated despite having seven teams in the tournament. Now, Michigan is the only remaining Big Ten team, putting many OSU fans in an awkward position. Allison Roda, a fourth-year in marketing and strategic communication, said she isn’t happy that Michigan is in the Final Four and OSU is not. “I’m definitely upset about it,” Roda said. “It just sucks and I don’t really care that there’s a Big Ten representative, I’d just rather it had been us.” Although there are quite a few Buckeye fans that feel the same way as Roda, there are also some fans that think Michigan making it to Atlanta for the Final Four reflects well on OSU. Tyler Shebeck, a first-year in business, is one of those fans with a positive attitude. “I’m happy Michigan is in the Final Four,” he said. “It’s a bummer we’re not, but at the same time, you have to look at it as a team representing the Big Ten, not as a rival. Plus it helps my bracket.” Whether you like it or not, Michigan will be playing in the Final Four and has a legitimate shot at a national championship. If you want to root against them, be my guest, but I can tell you right now whenever there is a chance to make the Big Ten look good and not appear to be a purely football conference, I will jump on that bandwagon. Michigan is set to face Syracuse Saturday at 8:49 p.m. at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta. Coverage will be on CBS. read more

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Football Fourstar 2018 cornerback Sevyn Banks commits to Ohio State

BMMMMM!!!!! pic.twitter.com/1V2ZxzMKWB— Mark Pantoni (@markpantoni) April 27, 2017 Orlando, Florida, native Sevyn Banks has reportedly committed to Ohio State, adding to the team’s haul for the 2018 recruiting class. First reported by Chris Hays of the Orlando Sentinel, Banks is the first cornerback to commit to the Buckeyes from the 2018 class.Banks, a 6-foot-1, 180-pound prospect, attended OSU’s annual spring game on April 15. He is currently ranked as the 22nd best cornerback in the class, even after a torn ACL kept him on the sideline for his entire junior season.OSU cornerbacks coach Kerry Coombs was at Banks’ high school in Orlando on Wednesday.The decision by Banks comes just one day after Georgia native and four-star defensive end Brenton Cox committed to play football in Columbus.Banks is the ninth member to give a verbal commitment to OSU in the 2018 class.Sevyn Banks commits to #OhioState https://t.co/SLvjFhwywr #buckeyes @BanksNiko pic.twitter.com/zddsja7yxC— Chris Hays, Orlando Sentinel (@OS_ChrisHays) April 26, 2017 A GREAT day planting flags in Orlando today! #homeofmickeymouseandfutureBuckeyes! Oh & by the way…BM!#lluvthesunshinestate— Kerry Coombs (@DB_CoachCoombs) April 27, 2017 read more

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Softball No 21 Ohio State remains on road for Texas Invitational

Second basemen Emily Clark makes an off-foot throw to first during the Sep. 24 gameagainst Wright State. Credit: Gretchen Rudolph | For The LanternAfter returning home with three of four possible wins in the Big Ten/ACC Challenge in Raleigh, North Carolina, the No. 21 Ohio State softball team will hit the road again when it heads to Austin, Texas, for four games in the Texas Invitational. The Buckeyes will take on Wichita State, Virginia Tech and Texas.Ohio State enters as the team with the best record (8-1) with Texas sitting at 4-4, Wichita State at 5-4 and Virginia Tech at 6-2. Despite the early success, neither the team nor head coach Kelly Kovach Schoenly are reading into these records too much.“As much as we will talk about the opponents, we try not to focus on the opponents,” Kovach Schoenly said, “Regardless of their record, they’re going to come out and try to beat Ohio State.”This weekend will be another full one with four games. The Buckeyes have already played four extra-inning games this season, three of which took place last weekend. Ohio State won two of those extra-inning games.“I just think it shows what we’ll be able to do throughout the season,” sophomore outfielder Spencer Sansom said. “It shows our energy. We want to compete, we want to be out there. We never give up.”The Buckeyes found success over the weekend based on contributions from all members of their team stepping up. Knowing that another long weekend lies ahead, Ohio State needs to have that happen again to come away with four wins.“The whole weekend, it was a new person every single time that stepped up and I think that’s what our advantage is,” junior catcher Emily Clark said. “We have a strong lineup, a strong nine.” Kovach Schoenly said Ohio State must watch out for Virginia Tech’s pitchers. Not only do they possess high strikeout rates, but she said they are also great hitters. As a team, Virginia Tech has struck out 58 batters in 54.1 innings. The team’s second-most effective pitcher, Carrie Eberle, also has been a potent hitter, batting .313 with one home run in seven games.The Buckeyes also will face a Texas team playing in front of its home crowd, one that Kovach Schoenly said can get the stands filled and create quite an atmosphere. But she thinks her team is ready and excited to spoil the game for the Longhorn fans. The only team Ohio State plays twice this weekend is Wichita State. The Shockers have struggled offensively, but has won five games on the strength of their pitching staff. The Shockers have been shut out in three losses — all to the only ranked opponents they have faced this season  — but have held opponents to just 10 combined runs in the five wins. Wichita State is hitting just .222 as a team, but has a team ERA of 3.66.Ohio State opens the series against Virginia Tech at 10 a.m. Friday before playing Wichita State at 3 p.m. later that day. It will play Texas at 6:30 p.m. and Wichita State at 9 p.m. Saturday. read more

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Experts to make smart map of railway suicide hot spots

first_imgWe need to move away from thinking that fences are the be-all and end-allIan Stevens, head of the Suicide Prevention Programme Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Currently, most suicide research is dominated by psychologists, who attempt to explain the phenomenon at an individual level, or by sociologists, who strive for societal explanations.Network Rail’s new strategy, however, aims to profile communities near known high-risk locations and then actively look for other towns and villages that fit the model.Ian Stevens, who runs the organisation’s Suicide Prevention Programme, said: “We need to move away from thinking that fences are the be-all and end-all.“All the prevention measures we could possibly have are in place at these stations, but unfortunately people still come and take their own life.“We need to understand the communities around these spots.”In 2015-16, 252 people took their own lives, or were suspected of having done so, on the railway network. This was 35 fewer than the previous year.On average, each incident causes 2,000 minutes of train delays and drivers involved in suicides typically lose 29 working days as they recover.The team has been trialling its methods at two locations with a high rate of suicide.In December, its remit will be expanded to a further four or five, with a view to expanding further in the coming months.Dr Robin Pharoah, the lead anthropologist, said his first task in any given community was to encourage suicide survivors to re-live their experience to find out what features attracted them to the nearby railway.“We’re going in and looking for clues,” he said.“The only thing we know in advance is that we don’t know what it is that we will find interesting.”Mr Stevens said that the data accumulated by Network Rail, which is updated daily, meant that staff were sometimes identifying areas with a high risk of suicide before local authorities, health services or charities.“If local authorities don’t know there is a flow of people coming to the railway they cannot help,” he said. “We’re trying to help paint a picture.”center_img A team of anthropologists has been hired to try to prevent suicides at sensitive locations on the railways where disruptions can cause gridlock.Network Rail has recruited the academics to study the communities around 32 such places.The team will use on-the-ground investigative procedures to understand what it is about “cluster” locations that attracts suicide attempts, meaning preventative measures like fences and police patrols can be bolstered.Their data is also intended to help create a smart map similar to those used by consumer analysts to try to predict where future suicide attempts will come from.last_img read more

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Ash dieback screening could leave trees defenceless against deadly beetles

first_imgOur research highlights the danger of selecting trees for resilience to ash dieback at the expense of resistance to insects that threaten this iconic UK tree speciesDr Christine Sambles, University of Exeter Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Caused by the hymenoscyphus fraxineus fungus, the disease is capable of killing young trees in a single season, and older trees over several years.Screening replacement trees in order to plant only those resistant to the disease is seen as the “best hope” of saving Britain’s ash population.Since 2013, the Forestry Commission has planted around 155,550 trees across 14 locations in the South East in an attempt to find out which types are disease resistant.But the new research from the universities of Exeter and Warwick suggests the types able to resist the fungus also have very low levels of the chemicals needed to defend against insects.In particular, it leaves them defenceless against the Emerald Ash Borer beetle, which has already devastated vast tracts of ash in the US and is currently spreading westwards across Europe. It means choosing saplings on the basis of their ability to withstand dieback could simply replace one lethal problem with another.“Our research highlights the danger of selecting trees for resilience to ash dieback at the expense of resistance to insects that threaten this iconic UK tree species, said Dr Christine Sambles, who co-led the research.Ash is Britain’s most common hedgerow tree, with 60,000 miles of tree lines, and the second most common woodland tree after oak.An infection of dieback is usually fatal for a tree, and the disease can be spread on the wind and by the movement of infected logs.The Forestry Commission has said its strategy to secure the long-term future of Britain’s ash trees lies in understanding the species’ genetic structure and how some varieties can survives dieback.However, the team from Exeter and Warwick also examined in the differences in the chemical composition between tolerant and susceptible ash trees.“Plants use a vast range of chemicals to defend against fungal attack, and the primary objective was to identify differences which could be used to screen young ash trees and choose the best ones for replanting, said Professor Murray Grant, from Warwick.“Our findings underline the need for further research to ensure that we select ash trees resilient to present and future threats.”Emerald Ash borer, a beetle which kills ash trees within two or three years, is not yet in the UK but is high on the Government’s plant risk register.In October the Woodland Trust announced it would launch an accreditation and labelling scheme for trees sold at nurseries as a guarantee that they have been grown in Britain from British seed.The “Buy British” initiative is intended to try to prevent foreign pests entering UK woodlands.An estimated six million trees were brought into Britain in the past three years, including 1.1 million oaks. Attempts to stall the spread of Ash dieback may backfire because trees selected to withstand the disease are particularly vulnerable to deadly attacks by insects, new research reveals.The “unexpected” data has prompted warnings from scientists about the hidden dangers of screening projects, such a major initiative currently being run by the Forestry Commission.The current outbreak of dieback, also called Chalara, was first detected in a nursery in Buckinghamshire in 2012, leading to fears the UK ash tree population could be all but wiped out.last_img read more

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