Behind Carmelo and Amare the Knicks Beat Heat Avoid

Carmelo Anthony had 41 points.It had been a long time since New York Knicks fans could celebrate a playoff victory. They had an NBA postseason record of 13 straight losses spanning 11 years. So, excuse them for dropping streamers from the rafters of Madison Square Garden last night after they extended their first-round series against the Miami Heat.The 89-87 victory likely only postponed the inevitable; Miami still leads the series 3-1 and looks to close out the Knicks at home on Wednesday. But, for New York, it did not matter.“A great win for us, for our fans to finally get over that hump of those consecutive games that we lost. . . over those years in the playoffs,” said forward Amare Stoudemire, who returned after missing a game because of that much-talked-about left hand he cut after Game 2. He was a factor, too, with 20 points and 10 rebounds.But it was all-star Carmelo Anthony who was the catalyst, scoring 41 points in a rousing performance. Anthony made a tie-breaking 3-pointer with 54.5 seconds left. Still, it took a Dwyane Wade missed three-pointer as time expired to give NY some playoff life.LeBron James scored 27 for the Heat, including some spectacular late-game baskets, and Wade added 22.The Knicks’ win was marred by the gruesome injury to starting guard Baron Davis, who dislocated his right knee while running a fast break. He is out for the remainder of the playoffs. read more

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Why The Cavaliers Blew It All Up At The Trade Deadline

Welcome to The Lab, FiveThirtyEight’s basketball podcast. On this week’s show (Feb. 8, 2018), FiveThirtyEight editor-in-chief Nate Silver joins Neil, Chris and Kyle to help break down what happened at this year’s NBA trade deadline. The Cleveland Cavaliers shook up their roster Thursday by acquiring Jordan Clarkson, George Hill, Rodney Hood and Larry Nance Jr. and saying goodbye to Jae Crowder, Isaiah Thomas and Dwyane Wade, among others. The group also brings you a significant digit on the Knicks’ Kristaps Porzingis, another victim of this year’s seemingly never-ending stream of injuries.Here are links to what was discussed this week:ESPN’s Kevin Pelton assessed the winners and losers of the trade deadline.Kyle wrote about how the Cavaliers fixed some of their big problems — but will it be enough?FiveThirtyEight debated some hypothetical LeBron trades earlier in the week. Embed Code By Neil Paine, Chris Herring and Kyle Wagner More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed read more

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Ohio State baseball drops final two games of Snowbird Classic

OSU junior left-hander Tanner Tully (16) delivers a pitch against Coastal Carolina on Feb. 27. OSU won 6-4.Credit: Courtesy of OSUThe trip to Port Charlotte, Florida, ended up being a bummer for the Buckeyes after a promising start, as the Ohio State Baseball team dropped back-to-back games for the first time this season.OSU fell to the Illinois State Redbirds 5-4 on Saturday and the Boston College Eagles 6-2 on Sunday, dropping its record to 6-4-1. The losses came after the Scarlet and Gray started the weekend’s action on the right foot, defeating Seton Hall 9-3 behind another offensive explosion from redshirt junior right fielder Jacob Bosiokovic.  Dropping a close one to the RedbirdsOSU opened Saturday’s game against Illinois State with one of its top pitchers, redshirt sophomore Adam Niemeyer, on the hill. Niemeyer, however, got off to a shaky start, allowing three runs in the first two innings. The righty would get back to his normal self over the rest of his six innings of work, but the 3-0 hole the Buckeyes fell into would prove to be tough to climb out of. The Buckeyes battled back, tying the game in the bottom of the fifth inning behind junior catcher Jalen Washington’s double down the right-field line to score junior left fielder Ronnie Dawson. OSU fell behind again in the seventh, but the deficit was quickly erased by junior center fielder Troy Montgomery’s solo home run to tie the game at 4-4. The homer was Montgomery’s third of the season, which is second most on the team. But the Redbirds would not be denied their first win of the Snowbird Classic, as OSU contributed to its own demise allowing the game-winning run in the top of the ninth on a fielding error by senior second baseman Nick Sergakis. OSU’s co-captain also had his season-long nine-game hitting streak snapped following an 0-for-4 day at the plate. On the other hand, Washington, OSU’s other co-captain, had a career-best day at the plate, going 4-for-4 with two RBIs in the loss. Niemeyer received a no-decision in the game and freshman pitcher Ryan Feltner (0-1) was tagged with the loss for his 2.2 innings of work. Redshirt junior Jack Landwehr (1-1) picked up the win for Illinois State, which improved to 3-6. Dominated by Boston CollegeIn the final game of the three-game trip to the Sunshine State, the Buckeyes’ typically powerful offense was outmatched by Eagles senior starter Jesse Adams and the Boston College pitching staff. OSU’s bats were silenced, only mustering two hits all game against the Eagles and providing little run support for senior starter John Havird.Boston College’s offense was led by junior center fielder Michael Strem, who knocked in the Eagles’ first run as part of his 2-for-4, two-RBI day. Senior infielder Jake Palomaki provided the insurance runs for the Eagles with his sixth-inning double that plated two. The win moved Boston College’s record to 9-1 as Adams (2-0) picked up the win for his six innings of scoreless baseball. The Buckeyes fell to 6-4-1, and Havird was hit with his first loss and decision of the year. OSU now is set to return to Columbus to prepare for its four-game series with UNLV in Las Vegas starting on Friday and ending four days later on March 15. After that, the Buckeyes will gear up for their home-opening series against Hofstra from March 18 to 20. read more

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OSU snaps losing skid beats Big Tenleading Michigan State

Down a starting player and facing a top-10 nationally ranked opponent, the No. 24 Ohio State women’s basketball team (11-6, 2-3) snapped a two-game losing streak when it knocked off No. 9 Michigan State (16-2, 4-1), 67-53, Sunday at the Schottenstein Center. The Buckeyes took a 33-29 lead into halftime after playing a closely contested half with the Spartans in which neither team extended a lead past six points. Five minutes into the half, OSU found itself without starting forward Sarah Schulze, who left the game, suffering what appeared to be a knee injury. OSU coach Jim Foster said he was not sure of her diagnosis. “Doctors will have to talk to you about that,” he said. “I’m not very optimistic.” The Buckeyes ratcheted up their defense in the second half, holding the Spartans to 25 percent shooting as they stretched their lead to double digits on a Brittany Johnson 3-pointer with 17 minutes remaining. The Spartans struggled to fight back, as the Buckeyes led by as many as 17 points in the second half. For the game, MSU connected on 20 of its 69 shot attempts, good for a 29 percent shooting percentage. “We played really hard on defense,” OSU center Jantel Lavender said. “It just created a better offense. We could transition a little bit better to get in our sets, and we got them a little frustrated.” Lavender led all scorers with 24 points and Tayler Hill added 17 for a Buckeye team that was in much need of a win. Prior to Sunday’s game, OSU had lost six of its last nine games. “We were desperate for a win, by any means necessary,” Lavender said. “We know how we have to play from now on.” Sunday’s victory gave the Buckeyes their second conference win of the season and handed the Big Ten-leading Spartans their first conference loss of the year. The Buckeyes play at 8 p.m. Thursday at Illinois, where they’ll attempt to pick up their first road win of the Big Ten season. “I just really want us to get after it on the road and not let other people’s crowds get into the game,” Lavender said. “We just got to come out and play hard every game, like we did tonight. It can’t just be at home.” read more

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Ohio State mens hockey coach losing sleep over not starting Brady Hjelle

You know you’re doing something right as an athlete when your coach loses sleep over not starting you in a game. Ohio State senior goalie Brady Hjelle is doing things right as his coach has done the late night pacing to prove it. Hjelle has been honored as the Central Collegiate Hockey Association’s goaltender of the week for the second time this season after a two game series against Lake Superior State. “Brady (Hjelle) deserves it,” sophomore forward Ryan Dzingel said. “He is a hard worker that has produced at every level he has been at.” Hjelle said he is trying to staying focused despite the accolades. “I’m proud of it,” he said, “but it has nothing to do with our standing in the league. Right now points are more important than individual awards.” Hjelle has been superior in league play games, leading the CCHA in both goals-against average and save percentage. His GAA is .62 and his save percentage is .977. To put that in perspective, Hjelle is third in the NCAA in those two categories with an overall GAA of 1.14 and a save percentage of .961. If his overall numbers were the same as his league play statistics he would be leading nation in both categories. Hjelle started the first game against the Lake Superior State last weekend and gave up only one goal on 32 shots in an OSU win. However, coach Mark Osiecki elected not to start Hjelle in the second game of the series. He was attempting to get freshman goalie Collin Olson some experience and put some pressure on Hjelle to keep playing his best hockey. Rotating goaltenders is a philosophy the coaching staff has been using all season. In the second game against the Lakers, it backfired. Lake Superior State scored two goals against Olson in the first 15 minutes of the game, and then Osiecki put Hjelle in. OSU eventually lost 3-2. The decision to start Olson may or may not have cost the Buckeyes the game, but it definitely cost Osiecki some sleep. “I woke up at 4:55 in the morning, walking around the house going, ‘I should have played Brady (Hjelle),’” Osiecki said. While the team’s philosophy of alternating goalies currently has OSU in second place in the CCHA, a win in their last game would have put them in first. The Buckeyes trail the first place Miami Redhawks by a single point in the standings. Osiecki said that if Hjelle plays well in the first game against Michigan State, he may get to start the second as well. When Osiecki was asked if he had any experience with a goalie as hot as Hjelle is right now, his answer was simple. “Only in Xbox,” he said. read more

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Ohio State fans in awkward situation with Michigan in Final 4

With Ohio State’s basketball season coming to an unexpected end Saturday night in the Elite Eight matchup against Wichita State at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, many Buckeyes are still trying to get over it. Junior guard Aaron Craft said he’s going into the offseason with big expectations for next year. “It’s tough right now. It’s crazy to think I’m down to one year left,” Craft said after the game. “We have to understand there’s a sense of urgency now. Ohio State is one of the best places in the country to be and we need to make the most of it.” Just a year ago, OSU students and fans from all over the country were preparing their trips to New Orleans for the Final Four. Unfortunately this year’s team couldn’t make it back. The Buckeyes haven’t made consecutive Final Four appearances since the 1960s, when they went to the Final Four three straight years (1960-1962). The four teams that will be playing in the Final Four are No. 1-seed Louisville, No. 9-seed Wichita State, No. 4-seed Syracuse and No. 4-seed Michigan. Heading into the NCAA Tournament, some analysts, like former NBA superstar Charles Barkley, felt the Big Ten conference was overrated despite having seven teams in the tournament. Now, Michigan is the only remaining Big Ten team, putting many OSU fans in an awkward position. Allison Roda, a fourth-year in marketing and strategic communication, said she isn’t happy that Michigan is in the Final Four and OSU is not. “I’m definitely upset about it,” Roda said. “It just sucks and I don’t really care that there’s a Big Ten representative, I’d just rather it had been us.” Although there are quite a few Buckeye fans that feel the same way as Roda, there are also some fans that think Michigan making it to Atlanta for the Final Four reflects well on OSU. Tyler Shebeck, a first-year in business, is one of those fans with a positive attitude. “I’m happy Michigan is in the Final Four,” he said. “It’s a bummer we’re not, but at the same time, you have to look at it as a team representing the Big Ten, not as a rival. Plus it helps my bracket.” Whether you like it or not, Michigan will be playing in the Final Four and has a legitimate shot at a national championship. If you want to root against them, be my guest, but I can tell you right now whenever there is a chance to make the Big Ten look good and not appear to be a purely football conference, I will jump on that bandwagon. Michigan is set to face Syracuse Saturday at 8:49 p.m. at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta. Coverage will be on CBS. read more

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Football Fourstar 2018 cornerback Sevyn Banks commits to Ohio State

BMMMMM!!!!! pic.twitter.com/1V2ZxzMKWB— Mark Pantoni (@markpantoni) April 27, 2017 Orlando, Florida, native Sevyn Banks has reportedly committed to Ohio State, adding to the team’s haul for the 2018 recruiting class. First reported by Chris Hays of the Orlando Sentinel, Banks is the first cornerback to commit to the Buckeyes from the 2018 class.Banks, a 6-foot-1, 180-pound prospect, attended OSU’s annual spring game on April 15. He is currently ranked as the 22nd best cornerback in the class, even after a torn ACL kept him on the sideline for his entire junior season.OSU cornerbacks coach Kerry Coombs was at Banks’ high school in Orlando on Wednesday.The decision by Banks comes just one day after Georgia native and four-star defensive end Brenton Cox committed to play football in Columbus.Banks is the ninth member to give a verbal commitment to OSU in the 2018 class.Sevyn Banks commits to #OhioState https://t.co/SLvjFhwywr #buckeyes @BanksNiko pic.twitter.com/zddsja7yxC— Chris Hays, Orlando Sentinel (@OS_ChrisHays) April 26, 2017 A GREAT day planting flags in Orlando today! #homeofmickeymouseandfutureBuckeyes! Oh & by the way…BM!#lluvthesunshinestate— Kerry Coombs (@DB_CoachCoombs) April 27, 2017 read more

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Softball No 21 Ohio State remains on road for Texas Invitational

Second basemen Emily Clark makes an off-foot throw to first during the Sep. 24 gameagainst Wright State. Credit: Gretchen Rudolph | For The LanternAfter returning home with three of four possible wins in the Big Ten/ACC Challenge in Raleigh, North Carolina, the No. 21 Ohio State softball team will hit the road again when it heads to Austin, Texas, for four games in the Texas Invitational. The Buckeyes will take on Wichita State, Virginia Tech and Texas.Ohio State enters as the team with the best record (8-1) with Texas sitting at 4-4, Wichita State at 5-4 and Virginia Tech at 6-2. Despite the early success, neither the team nor head coach Kelly Kovach Schoenly are reading into these records too much.“As much as we will talk about the opponents, we try not to focus on the opponents,” Kovach Schoenly said, “Regardless of their record, they’re going to come out and try to beat Ohio State.”This weekend will be another full one with four games. The Buckeyes have already played four extra-inning games this season, three of which took place last weekend. Ohio State won two of those extra-inning games.“I just think it shows what we’ll be able to do throughout the season,” sophomore outfielder Spencer Sansom said. “It shows our energy. We want to compete, we want to be out there. We never give up.”The Buckeyes found success over the weekend based on contributions from all members of their team stepping up. Knowing that another long weekend lies ahead, Ohio State needs to have that happen again to come away with four wins.“The whole weekend, it was a new person every single time that stepped up and I think that’s what our advantage is,” junior catcher Emily Clark said. “We have a strong lineup, a strong nine.” Kovach Schoenly said Ohio State must watch out for Virginia Tech’s pitchers. Not only do they possess high strikeout rates, but she said they are also great hitters. As a team, Virginia Tech has struck out 58 batters in 54.1 innings. The team’s second-most effective pitcher, Carrie Eberle, also has been a potent hitter, batting .313 with one home run in seven games.The Buckeyes also will face a Texas team playing in front of its home crowd, one that Kovach Schoenly said can get the stands filled and create quite an atmosphere. But she thinks her team is ready and excited to spoil the game for the Longhorn fans. The only team Ohio State plays twice this weekend is Wichita State. The Shockers have struggled offensively, but has won five games on the strength of their pitching staff. The Shockers have been shut out in three losses — all to the only ranked opponents they have faced this season  — but have held opponents to just 10 combined runs in the five wins. Wichita State is hitting just .222 as a team, but has a team ERA of 3.66.Ohio State opens the series against Virginia Tech at 10 a.m. Friday before playing Wichita State at 3 p.m. later that day. It will play Texas at 6:30 p.m. and Wichita State at 9 p.m. Saturday. read more

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Experts to make smart map of railway suicide hot spots

first_imgWe need to move away from thinking that fences are the be-all and end-allIan Stevens, head of the Suicide Prevention Programme Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Currently, most suicide research is dominated by psychologists, who attempt to explain the phenomenon at an individual level, or by sociologists, who strive for societal explanations.Network Rail’s new strategy, however, aims to profile communities near known high-risk locations and then actively look for other towns and villages that fit the model.Ian Stevens, who runs the organisation’s Suicide Prevention Programme, said: “We need to move away from thinking that fences are the be-all and end-all.“All the prevention measures we could possibly have are in place at these stations, but unfortunately people still come and take their own life.“We need to understand the communities around these spots.”In 2015-16, 252 people took their own lives, or were suspected of having done so, on the railway network. This was 35 fewer than the previous year.On average, each incident causes 2,000 minutes of train delays and drivers involved in suicides typically lose 29 working days as they recover.The team has been trialling its methods at two locations with a high rate of suicide.In December, its remit will be expanded to a further four or five, with a view to expanding further in the coming months.Dr Robin Pharoah, the lead anthropologist, said his first task in any given community was to encourage suicide survivors to re-live their experience to find out what features attracted them to the nearby railway.“We’re going in and looking for clues,” he said.“The only thing we know in advance is that we don’t know what it is that we will find interesting.”Mr Stevens said that the data accumulated by Network Rail, which is updated daily, meant that staff were sometimes identifying areas with a high risk of suicide before local authorities, health services or charities.“If local authorities don’t know there is a flow of people coming to the railway they cannot help,” he said. “We’re trying to help paint a picture.”center_img A team of anthropologists has been hired to try to prevent suicides at sensitive locations on the railways where disruptions can cause gridlock.Network Rail has recruited the academics to study the communities around 32 such places.The team will use on-the-ground investigative procedures to understand what it is about “cluster” locations that attracts suicide attempts, meaning preventative measures like fences and police patrols can be bolstered.Their data is also intended to help create a smart map similar to those used by consumer analysts to try to predict where future suicide attempts will come from.last_img read more

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Ash dieback screening could leave trees defenceless against deadly beetles

first_imgOur research highlights the danger of selecting trees for resilience to ash dieback at the expense of resistance to insects that threaten this iconic UK tree speciesDr Christine Sambles, University of Exeter Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Caused by the hymenoscyphus fraxineus fungus, the disease is capable of killing young trees in a single season, and older trees over several years.Screening replacement trees in order to plant only those resistant to the disease is seen as the “best hope” of saving Britain’s ash population.Since 2013, the Forestry Commission has planted around 155,550 trees across 14 locations in the South East in an attempt to find out which types are disease resistant.But the new research from the universities of Exeter and Warwick suggests the types able to resist the fungus also have very low levels of the chemicals needed to defend against insects.In particular, it leaves them defenceless against the Emerald Ash Borer beetle, which has already devastated vast tracts of ash in the US and is currently spreading westwards across Europe. It means choosing saplings on the basis of their ability to withstand dieback could simply replace one lethal problem with another.“Our research highlights the danger of selecting trees for resilience to ash dieback at the expense of resistance to insects that threaten this iconic UK tree species, said Dr Christine Sambles, who co-led the research.Ash is Britain’s most common hedgerow tree, with 60,000 miles of tree lines, and the second most common woodland tree after oak.An infection of dieback is usually fatal for a tree, and the disease can be spread on the wind and by the movement of infected logs.The Forestry Commission has said its strategy to secure the long-term future of Britain’s ash trees lies in understanding the species’ genetic structure and how some varieties can survives dieback.However, the team from Exeter and Warwick also examined in the differences in the chemical composition between tolerant and susceptible ash trees.“Plants use a vast range of chemicals to defend against fungal attack, and the primary objective was to identify differences which could be used to screen young ash trees and choose the best ones for replanting, said Professor Murray Grant, from Warwick.“Our findings underline the need for further research to ensure that we select ash trees resilient to present and future threats.”Emerald Ash borer, a beetle which kills ash trees within two or three years, is not yet in the UK but is high on the Government’s plant risk register.In October the Woodland Trust announced it would launch an accreditation and labelling scheme for trees sold at nurseries as a guarantee that they have been grown in Britain from British seed.The “Buy British” initiative is intended to try to prevent foreign pests entering UK woodlands.An estimated six million trees were brought into Britain in the past three years, including 1.1 million oaks. Attempts to stall the spread of Ash dieback may backfire because trees selected to withstand the disease are particularly vulnerable to deadly attacks by insects, new research reveals.The “unexpected” data has prompted warnings from scientists about the hidden dangers of screening projects, such a major initiative currently being run by the Forestry Commission.The current outbreak of dieback, also called Chalara, was first detected in a nursery in Buckinghamshire in 2012, leading to fears the UK ash tree population could be all but wiped out.last_img read more

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John Bercow orchestrated row over Donald Trumps UK visit government sources believe

first_img“Bercow did this to win Labour, SNP and Lib Dem support for staying on,” a senior member of Theresa May’s Government said. “He has orchestrated the whole thing.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. It had previously been expected that Mr Bercow would stand down next year.But after making his comments about Mr Trump, Mr Bercow has been supported by numerous MPs from Labour, the Liberal Democrats and the SNP, who said they would oppose any attempt to oust him.It means it is likely that Mr Bercow will be able to remain in post for years. It is understood that Mr Bercow has told friends and allies he wants to remain in post until at least 2020. Cabinet ministers have told the Telegraph that they believe Mr Bercow (centre) intentionally created the row as part of a plot to ensure he stays on as Commons Speaker until at least 2020Credit:Dan Kitwood/Getty Images Lord Fowler, the Speaker of the Lords, expressed anger that he was not consulted by Mr Bercow about his statement. He suggested that he and Mr Bercow should be stripped of their ability to “effectively veto” foreign leaders from addressing Parliament. John Bercow “orchestrated” a row over Donald Trump’s visit to the UK to allow him to stay in post as Commons Speaker until 2020, government sources believe.Mr Bercow was accused of violating his political impartiality after he said on Monday that he wanted to prevent the US President from addressing Parliament during a forthcoming state visit.He said he wanted to stop Mr Trump from speaking in Westminster Hall because of his “racism and sexism”.It prompted one Conservative MP, James Duddridge, to table a motion of no confidence in Mr Bercow, which has been formally supported by two Tory backbenchers.However, Cabinet ministers have told the Telegraph they believe Mr Bercow intentionally created the row as part of a plot to ensure he stays on as Commons Speaker until at least 2020. Allies of Mr Bercow said that he had simply been responding to a point of order in Parliament by Stephen Doughty, a Labour MP, calling on officials to withhold permission for an address to Westminster Hall by Mr Trump.But a number of Conservatives claim that Mr Bercow knew the question was coming and had pre-prepared his remarks.Mr Bercow drew a furious response from ministers on Monday when he told MPs: “We value our relationship with the United States. However, as far as this place is concerned, I feel very strongly that our opposition to racism and to sexism and our support for equality before the law and an independent judiciary are hugely important considerations in the House of Commons.”Before the imposition of the migrant ban, I would myself have been strongly opposed to an address by President Trump in Westminster Hall. After the imposition of the migrant ban by President Trump, I am even more strongly opposed to an address by President Trump in Westminster Hall.”center_img A number of Conservatives claim that Mr Bercow knew the question was coming and had pre-prepared his remarks A number of Conservatives claim that Mr Bercow knew the question was coming and had pre-prepared his remarksCredit:Paul Grover for the Telegraph Cabinet ministers have told the Telegraph that they believe Mr Bercow intentionally created the row as part of a plot to ensure he stays on as Commons Speaker until at least 2020. Alec Shelbrooke, a Tory MP, on Friday voiced support for Mr Duddridge’s motion, saying that although Mr Trump’s “faith-based migrant ban” is “discriminatory” and “wrong”, Mr Bercow had “politicised the office of Speaker and his position is untenable”.However, Labour MPs defended Mr Bercow.Kate Osamor said: “John Bercow has my full support and I won’t be voting for a motion of no confidence.”And Seema Malhotra, a former shadow minister, said: “Lots of support for Speaker Bercow, who does his job with impeccable fairness and honesty.”Tim Farron, the Liberal Democrat leader, has written to the Speaker to stress his support for him. Bercow did this to win Labour, SNP and Lib Dem support for staying onSenior member of Theresa May’s Governmentlast_img read more

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Where theres muck theres brass the muddy jeans that cost £330

first_imgDistressed jeans by Nordstrom Distressed jeans by Nordstrom from their website http://shop.nordstrom.com/ The Telegraph’s India Sturgis recreating the look of Nordstrom jeans by buying a pair form a charity shop and distressing them herselfCredit:Andrew Crowley  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.  India Sturgis recreating the look of Nordstrom jeans by buying a pair form a charity shop and distressing them herself. Wearing jeans caked in mud usually means one of three things: you’re a farmer, a labourer or a five-year-old who has rolled down a hill.If you’re wearing this particular pair, it also means you’re the height of fashion. The £350 denims on sale at luxury retailer Nordstrom come complete with mud stains.The jeans have “a crackled, caked-on muddy coating that shows you’re not afraid to get down and dirty”, according to the marketing blurb, which adds that they are based on “rugged Americana workwear”. “They’re not even fashion. They’re a costume for wealthy people who see work as ironic,” he said in a blog post. Underneath, one man had written: “Shoot, Mike, I work in the oilfield and you just helped me realise I have a goldmine hanging in my closet.”Another said: “I am a farrier. After working under horses, at the anvil and in the mud I shall return home, carefully remove my work jeans, perhaps autograph and date them inside the front pocket (for quality control purposes), photograph and sell to the highest bidder on eBay.”The days when ripped jeans were the height of daring are long gone. Nordstrom was ridiculed last month for selling jeans that featured clear plastic panels over the knees, although they were a more purse-friendly £49.Topshop recently launched a pair of entirely transparent jeans, made of clear plastic, for £55. They are currently sold out. One review on the store’s website said: “9/10, would recommend but they do have a slight problem with VPL.”The most current trend is for cropped jeans with a frayed hem – easily achievable with a pair of scissors and a ruler. Mike Rowe, who presented the Discovery Channel series Dirty Jobs in which he tried out occupations ranging from demolition worker to ostrich wrangler, took umbrage at the muddy jeans. The fact that they are also machine washable suggests that the mud isn’t exactly authentic. Nor is the ‘Americana’ tag entirely: although designed by New York label PRPS, they are manufactured in Portugal from Japanese denim.The “heavily distressed medium-blue denim jeans in a comfortable straight-leg fit” are from PRPS’s ‘Barracuda’ range, and come with a matching “mud denim jacket” for the same price.Other styles are named ‘Krill’, ‘Phytoplankton’, ‘Outer Space’ and ‘Radiation’, and come with artfully designed holes and rips.One pair are doused in red paint, lending the wearer the air of someone who has either spilt ketchup on their trousers or been stabbed in the abdomen.On Nordstrom’s own website, shoppers were quick to scoff. “Gotta love being able to look like I have fed the pigs, helped deliver a calf, and got the tractor unstuck without ever having to leave my BMW,” one wrote. Another asked if the “deluxe” model came covered in cow manure.last_img read more

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The unfortunate owl and the pussycat

first_imgThe owl manages to flap away, but not quickly enough to escape fatal injuries The tawny owl chick – which was still learning to fly – managed to flap away and escape Lucu’s claws until keepers ushered the cub back inside. Unfortunately the owl was too badly hurt to be saved.Paul Jarvis, who captured the moment during a visit to the Devon zoo, said: “It was clear the tiger was interested in something, then the owl came out of the bushes and the tiger was pawing at it like a bird or mouse in your garden would. The owl was very brave and didn’t look intimidated at all.” It takes some bottle to stand up to sharp toothed tiger, especially when you’re a feathered fraction of its size.But when a baby owl found itself in the path of Lucu, a Sumatran tiger cub, after falling into his enclosure at Paignton Zoo, it showed no signs of backing down. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The owl manages to flap away, but not quickly enough to escape fatal injuriesCredit:Paul Jarvis/SWNSlast_img read more

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T Rex could not have outrun a speedy human scientists conclude

first_imgResearchers at the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research, Leipzig, looked at almost 500 species, ranging from molluscs to whales, to find out how size was related to speed.Zoologist Dr Myriam Hirt, of the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research, Leipzig, said: “Palaeontologists have long debated the potential running speeds of large birds and dinosaurs, that roamed past ecosystems. Humans could outrun a Tyrannosaurus RexCredit:Jurassic Park So if acceleration time in the anaerobic phase exceeds the amount of energy that can be made available to muscles, the maximum achievable speed reaches an upper limit.Dr Hirt said: “Put simply, small to intermediately sized animals accelerate quickly and have enough time to reach their theoretical maximum speed, whereas large animals are limited in acceleration time and run out of readily mobilisable energy before being able to reach their theoretically possible maximum.“In nature, the fastest running or swimming animals such as cheetahs or marlins are of intermediate size.”The team found maximum speed falls rapidly as animals grow beyond average size.For huge animals such as T Rex, which weighed up to nine tons, the time required to accelerate to faster speeds outstrips the time available for acceleration. However humans could not have run away from a velociraptor  Humans could outrun a Tyrannosaurus Rex “This is consistent with theories claiming Tyrannosaurus was very likely to have been a slow runner.”Under Dr Hirt’s hypothesis, animals have only a finite amount of time to accelerate from a standing start before they can accelerate no longer.They find this is because the acceleration phase requires muscles to function anaerobically, without oxygen, during which only limited stores of energy are available.Larger animals take longer than smaller ones to accelerate to their maximum speed.center_img However humans could not have run away from a velociraptor Credit:Jurassic Park  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The research was published in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution. Its name may translate as ‘king of the tyrant lizards’ but Tyrannosaurus Rex could not have outrun a speedy human, scientists have concluded, making a mockery of Jurassic Park.Although it was previously thought the dinosaur could sprint at around 45mph, German scientists have discovered that the lumbering beast was so massive it would have struggled to accelerate beyond a medium trot.In fact, researchers calculated that T Rex could only have clocked a running speed of 16.5mph, just one mph faster than the average human, and a 11 mph slower than Usain Bolt, the fastest man on Earth.And the dinosaur certainly would not have been capable of keeping up with a moving Jeep, as shown in Spielberg’s Jurassic Park.However even Bolt could not have out-run a velociraptor, who would have been one of the fastest dinosaurs with the ability to run at 34 mph.last_img read more

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Magic Mushrooms warning as foragers told mild winter has led to abundance

“We haven’t really had a heavy frost yet which is what usually kills them off.”There is quite a lot of fungi lurking around, some have been late growing late because of the very hot and dry weather into later in the year.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Foragers have been warned of an abundance of magic mushrooms after the mild winter caused the psychedelic fungi to thrive.Specialists say the warmer weather means the psychedelic, naturally-occurring class-A drug has been found growing in large numbers across Staffordshire and Shropshire.John Hughes, a fungi expert at Shropshire Wildlife Trust, warned: “The longer the season, the greater the risk foragers could accidentally pick something hallucinogenic, so with the warmer winter this is definitely more of a risk this year than in previous years.“The key thing foragers should be aware of is not to pick anything you’re not sure what it is.“It is as simple as that, because there are many things out there which are toxic.”Usually, the fungi, found on grasslands and pastures grazed by sheep due to the nutrient-rich manure, are long gone by this time of year, but the mild and wet weather means they  have stuck around.Amateur mushroom enthusiasts have therefore been told to err on the side of caution.The mushrooms are illegal to possess, cultivate, transport or sell in the UK, but it is not an offence for them to be grown on your land as they live in the wild.Jane Traynor, from the Staffordshire Fungi Group, said: “Psilocybe semilanceata are quite common and you do find quite a lot of them around Staffordshire. read more

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Cambridge student fined for giving feminism talk in Russia during sinister crackdown

The student has been working with the St. Petersburg-based feminist organisation Eve’s Ribs since November 2018.Daria Apakhonchich, an Eve’s Ribs representative, said: “What happened to Harriet in Krasnoyarsk is one of many incidents which reveal the inner workings of our state. “Instead of recriminalising domestic violence, closing the gender pay gap, cracking down on discrimination in employment and higher education, helping victims of domestic, sexual and reproductive violence, fighting arranged child marriages and female genital mutilation, our state spends taxpayers money fighting feminist activists.” Foreign exchange students in Russia have been warned that they are “soft targets” after a Cambridge undergraduate was fined for giving a feminism talk on her year abroad.  Harriet Phillips, 21, was visiting friends in the Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk when she was invited to informally address some 40 people on subjects including the patriarchy and gender stereotypes.But fifteen minutes into the talk she was interrupted by three men – one of whom she claims was an FSB agent – who filmed her speaking then ordered that the computer operating her presentation slides be switched off. The audience was told there would be a “technical break” while the officials from the Federal Migration Service told Miss Phillips she had breached Russian migration law because her tourist visa did not permit her to give educational talks.Miss Phillips, who was on an exchange programme at St. Petersburg State University, insisted it was an open meeting and the talk was simply a warm-up before a group discussion.But she was questioned for four hours and fined 2,000 roubles (£25). One of the officers admitted they would not have detained her if she had been talking about the weather rather than feminism. The city of Krasnoyarsk in Siberia, where Harriet was visiting friends on a tourist visa The city of Krasnoyarsk in Siberia, where Harriet was visiting friends on a tourist visaCredit:Ilya Naymushin/Reuters Miss Phillips was warned by a journalist before her talk began that someone might try to spring a “surprise” on her at the end.  The Modern and Medieval languages student thinks someone had incorrectly told the authorities she was giving a talk in breach of her tourist visa in order to stop her sharing ideas about feminism.She told The Telegraph: “The most likely explanation for what happened is a self-righteous citizen of misogynistic persuasion saw the event advertised online and decided to shut it down by tipping off the Ministry of Internal Affairs.”One of the officers informed me that they wouldn’t have bothered to intervene if the chosen topic of my conversation was the weather.”After being detained, officers asked to see her passport and visa. She was questioned about what sights she was seeing in Russia, and if she was married or had children.Miss Phillips was with officers from the Migration Department of the Ministry of Internal Affairs for four hours before being charged under Article 18.8.2 of the Code of Administrative Offenses of the Russian Federation.The charge states that there is a “discrepancy between stated purpose of entering the Russian Federation and the type of occupation actually carried out”. She said: “I was told that there could be two possible chains of events – either I sign a statement admitting to my guilt, the head of the Migration Department approves it, then I pay a 2,000 rouble fine. This is the second time a foreign exchange student has been rapped by Russian officials for supposed visa violations.Last month a German exchange student was expelled from St. Petersburg State University and fined 4,000 roubles (£50) for interviewing environmental protesters in the Russian city of Chelyabinsk then publishing an article about it on a German news website.Police told Lukas Latz, an Eastern European Studies undergraduate from Berlin, that publishing the article constituted “work” and this violated the terms of his student visa.Lukas had insisted he wrote the article as part of his master’s thesis on environmental activism in Russia.Now Amnesty International has spoke out about exchange students in Russia being treated like criminals, which they say is becoming increasingly common.Natalia Prilutskaya, Amnesty International’s Russia Researcher, said: “We’re seeing more and more cases like this in Russia – where perfectly legitimate activism or even religious observance from overseas students are being treated as criminal offences.“In two recent cases in Nizhnii Novgorod, for example, students from African countries were prosecuted for ‘missionary’ activities in relation to their attendance at a Protestant church.“Overseas students are something of a soft target for the authorities, while the wider context is that anyone in Russia is at risk of persecution if they take part in political protests or activism of any kind.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “Or, if I refuse to cooperate, the case gets sent to court and I could end up with a five-year ban on entering the country. I agreed to the first option.”Miss Phillips, who is leaving Russia in August and returning to Cambridge for her final year in October, paid the fine the next day.But her ordeal was not over, as she has since received torrents of abuse on Russian social network VKontakte for daring to talk about feminism.The insulting comments included: ‘Take your feminism back to Gayurope, you witch’; ‘Go home you swine. If I ever get my hands on you…’’; ‘You can take your Gayuropean values and f*** right off! Go and live with your tolerance’; ‘They should have deported her straight away’;  ‘It’s obvious she’s a lesbian’;  ‘She needs to be sent back to Scotland and banned from reentering Russia… f*** right off you spy’.Miss Phillips added: “I’m incredibly disappointed that a highly interesting exchange of thoughts and ideas was not able to take place.”I am speechless with anger that the Russian state chooses to squander valuable time and energy chasing after a Scottish feminist, as the Russian internet has now dubbed me, instead of tackling the endemic violence which grips the country.” read more

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Growing number of birds of prey killed illegally with no fear of

The charity points out that in the last two years only one person has been convicted under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 for killing a bird of prey. As a result, the RSPB is now calling for an independent review of driven grouse shooting in England and for grouse moors to be licensed across the UK.Martin Harper, conservation director at the charity, said: “The driven grouse shooting industry has, despite decades of warnings, failed to put its house in order – most shockingly turning a blind eye to the ongoing illegal persecution of birds of prey.   “Given we face a climate and ecological emergency, we believe it is time for governments to intervene. A first step should be, as is happening in Scotland, independent reviews of driven grouse shooting for the rest of the UK. Ultimately, the RSPB believes that change will only come through regulation.”Landowners, shooting organisations and anti-RSPB groups rejected the report’s findings.Ian Gregory, spokesman for You Forgot The Birds, said: “This is a cynical spin operation from a charity which cares more about headlines than showing what is going on with nature. The charity’s own figures show that UK bird crime has been on a falling trend this decade.“This trend was made even more obvious this month when Natural England declared that 2019 has been ‘a record breaking’ year for hen harriers.” Carcass of a golden eagle found poisoned in ScotlandCredit:RSPB Mark Thomas, Head of Investigations UK at the RSPB, said: “The illegal and widespread killing of birds of prey has gone on for too long. Current legislation and sentences are proving woefully inadequate and offering absolutely no deterrent to those who want to see birds of prey eradicated from our hills.”Mr Thomas added: “Urgent and meaningful change is needed to the way our uplands are managed, to put an end once and for all to illegal killing and bring back biodiversity to these landscapes. Enough is enough.”The Birdcrime 2018 report also raises concerns over the environmental impact of intensive grouse shooting, including the burning of carbon-rich habitats which increases flood risks and releases carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  Figures from the RSPB’s latest Birdcrime report reveals that in 2018, 31 buzzards, 27 red kites and 6 peregrines were illegally shot, trapped or poisoned on land managed for driven grouse shooting. Hen harriers and owls were also illegally killed in disturbing numbers. The report follows anger after a gamekeeper convicted of killing protected birds of prey in Scotland avoided jail term last week.Alan Wilson, 60, pleaded guilty to shooting and trapping badgers, an otter, goshawks and buzzards and installing 32 illegal snares in a small wood on a grouse and pheasant shooting estate at Longformacus, in the Borders.That came amid widespread concern over a young golden eagle photographed flying in the Crathie area of Deeside with a heavy steel trap attached to its leg.Sixty-seven (77%) of last year’s recorded deaths took place in England, with 12 in Scotland, five in Wales, three in Northern Ireland. Despite this, only one incident, from a 2017 investigation, resulted in a conviction during the year. He added: “The RSPB chooses not to congratulate the shooting sector for getting its house in order but to keep attacking it because the alternative would a focus on its own failings. This is the charity which has for 7 years refused to publish the number of birds on its 200 reserves.” An illegally set spring trap on moorland found by RSPB investigatorsCredit:RSPB The report says the worst locations for illegal killing of birds are the uplands of the Peak District, North Yorkshire and southern Scotland, where the land is managed by landowners and their staff for driven grouse shooting. The report finds that on some grouse moors, birds of prey and other protected species are routinely and illegally trapped, shot and poisoned, in contravention of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, which protects all birds of prey. Intelligence and scientific data from satellite tagging of birds suggests many more birds than have been recorded will have been killed and not found, with the figures offering what the charity describes as “only a glimpse into a far larger problem”.A recently published ten-year scientific study using Natural England data revealed 72% of satellite-tagged hen harriers were confirmed or considered very likely to have been illegally killed. It also found that hen harriers are ten times more likely to die or disappear over grouse moors, where birds of prey are often considered a threat to red grouse stocks. An illegally set spring trap on moorland found by RSPB investigators Carcass of a golden eagle found poisoned in Scotland Short-eared owl shot in Peak District Credit:RSPB Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The number of birds of prey illegally trapped and poisoned on moorland has more than tripled in the past two years, new figures have revealed.A report by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds has found that growing numbers of birds of prey are being illegally shot, trapped and poisoned on shooting estates, amid claims those responsible are growing increasingly confident of evading prosecution.The report published on Thursday reveals that 87 birds of prey were killed last year, including buzzards, red kites and peregrines.That is an increase on the figure of 68 birds of prey known to have been killed illegally the previous year, with at least 81 killed in 2016.However the charity fears the true figure could be far higher, with many illegal killings going undetected or unreported. The report found that in 2017 16 birds of prey were trapped or poisoned on land managed for driven grouse shooting, with the numbers jumping to 54 killed by those methods the following year.The RSPB has now called for tougher legislation and enforcement to act as a deterrent to those who believe they can get away with killing birds of prey without fear of punishment. Short-eared owl shot in Peak District  read more

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Caribbean cricket hijacked by small clique – Dr Rowley

Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Related’Bankruptcy of WICB would have been best for Windies cricket’ – says T&T Prime MinisterMarch 17, 2016In “Sports”T&T’s Queen’s Park Oval gets India Test matchMay 5, 2016In “Sports”CARICOM acquiring legal advice as WICB fight intensifiesMarch 14, 2016In “latest news” Cricket in the Caribbean has been “hijacked by a small clique” of people. That is the assertion of Dr Keith Rowley, the Prime Minister of Trinidad & Tobago, who is part of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) that has been highly critical of the West Indies Cricket Board (WICB). The CARICOM has blamed the WICB for West Indies’ slump in the ICC’s Test and ODI rankings for more than a decade.Dr Keith Rowley, the Prime Minister of Trinidad & Tobago, is dismayed by the lack of crowds at matches in the West Indies (AFP photo)The CARICOM’s opposition to the WICB coincided with the rise of Dave Cameron, who was unanimously re-elected for a third successive term as board president. Last year Cameron rejected the CARICOM cricket review panel’s recommendation to dissolve the WICB.According to Cameron, the CARICOM panel had ignored the “sweeping” changes brought in by the WICB since 2002 in its governance structure and had also failed to consult territorial boards and WICB directors before listing its findings.The defiant attitude of Cameron and the WICB, according to Rowley, had only distracted from the real question of who owns Caribbean cricket. The CARICOM, he said, believes cricket is a public product that belongs to the people and not to the WICB.“Caribbean cricket has been hijacked by a small clique of people who are hell bent on destroying Caribbean cricket,” Rowley told the Trinidad-based TV station CNC3 TV on Wednesday. “And this is my position that unless the question is answered as to who owns that asset we spinning top in mud.”The WICB, Rowley said, had told him the board was not accountable to the CARICOM any more, considering it was now a business entity and had become West Indies Inc.In the media release it sent out following Cameron’s re-election, the WICB had spoken of its efforts to rebrand itself.“In moving forward, the President and the team will have the new strategic plan which will facilitate improved performances at the regional and international level and explore a more robust governance system,” the WICB said. “The strategy revolves around the rebranding of Cricket West Indies; the development of our commercial arm – Windies Inc; and the creation of a development foundation to finance cricket development in the region”.Rowley has questioned the basis for the change.“I was told to my face, me and my colleague the Prime Minister of Grenada, that you all have no say in this. This is West Indies Cricket Inc. West Indies Cricket Incorporated. And it is their shareholders that they have to please. I don’t know who the shareholders are, but what I do know [is] unless there are drastic changes to the current arrangements West Indies cricket will never get back to where it is expected to be.”For Rowley, in addition to the decline in West Indies cricket, the most “painful” thing was the fans moving away from the game. He gave the example of driving past Queen’s Park Oval in Port-of-Spain and being bewildered by the silence inside when a match was on.“You know how painful it is for me. In this country lining up outside the [Queen’s Park] Oval from 6’0 clock in the morning to get in. That’s how cricket used to be. Barbados is playing Trinidad & Tobago and the Oval is full because you got to beat them Bajans, ha! And now, you are passing outside the Oval and you ask, “what’s happening in there?” You know how painful that is.” (ESPNCricinfo) Nagraj Gollapudi is a senior assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo read more

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Guyoil drops gas prices by 4 per litre takes effect from

The Guyana Oil Company Ltd (Guyoil) in a statement on Tuesday announced a reduction in prices for Gasoline and Gasoil (LSD) with effect from Wednesday July 10, 2018, as follows;“Gasoline from $230/litre to $226/litre and Gasoil (LSD) From $219/litre to $215/litre.”According to Guyoil the price reductions were possible due to “declining acquisition costs and the savings are now being passed on to customers.”Moreover, the oil company pledged “that any savings as a result of declining acquisition cost will at all times be passed on to the customers.” Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedGuyoil announces reduction in Gas pricesMarch 8, 2018In “Business”Govt announces lower Guyoil gas pricesFebruary 4, 2019In “Business”A political gimmick? …Questions raised as GuyOil finally lowers gas pricesFebruary 6, 2019In “latest news” read more

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Leader of Opposition met Chairman of CARICOM and team

Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedCARICOM leaders to meet with UN Secretary General on VenezuelaJanuary 28, 2019In “Regional”Shifting EU goalposts demand unified regional response – CARICOMMarch 1, 2019In “latest news”CARICOM warns of elusive peace in VenezuelaMay 8, 2019In “latest news” Leader of the Opposition, Dr. Bharrat Jagdeo, earlier today met with the Chairman of CARICOM, Hon. Dr. Timothy Harris, Prime Minister of St. Kitts and Nevis and team, including CARICOM-Secretary-General Ambassador Irwin LaRocque , at the Office of the Leader of the Opposition, 304 Church Street, Queenstown, Georgetown.The meeting discussed the no-confidence motion against the current APNU/AFC Coalition government.Chairman of CARICOM, Hon. Dr. Timothy Harris greets PPP Chief Whip, Gail TexieiraCARICOM-Secretary-General Ambassador Irwin LaRocque and PPP Presidential Candidate, Irfaan AliOpposition Leader Bharrat Jagdeo in discussions with the CARICOM Team read more

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