‘Social security benefits elude migrant workers’

first_imgA latest study by the Patiala-based Punjabi University on rural-urban migration of workers in Punjab and Haryana has revealed that most migrant workers suffer from non-availability of social security benefits and spend the prime time of their life in cities with poor working and sanitation conditionsThe study titled ‘Rural-Urban Migration, Informal Sector Employment and Income Differentials: Reflections from two Indian States — Punjab and Haryana’ was completed recently by the Centre for Development Economics and Innovation Studies of Punjabi University, Patiala.“In both Punjab and Haryana, very low proportion of sampled migrants had access to benefits such as employees provident fund. Even protection from the occupational hazards was found to be less than 0.40% of migrant workers. Besides, benefits of State-specific social security could not be percolated to the migratory labour that belonged to other States,” said Lakhwinder Singh, professor of economics, a member in the study team. “In Punjab, the migrants from other States could not access the State’s ‘Atta Dal’ scheme and State-specific social pensions for the poor, aged persons, orphan children, destitute women. As most of these migrants have their ration or voter card registered at their native places they could not get benefits of the State-run social welfare schemes,” he added.The study is based on 3,962 selected migrant households from both the States — 1,992 from Punjab and 1,970 from Haryana. The study pointed out that rural areas of Punjab send 30% of workers to urban areas, whereas Haryana sends nearly 41% of rural workers to its cities. The majority, 70% in Punjab and 59% in Haryana, come from other States.last_img read more

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Supreme Court to hear Shillong Times editor’s plea

first_imgA Supreme Court Bench led by Chief Justice of India agreed on Thursday to hear a plea by Shillong Times editor Patricia Mukhim against an order of the Meghalaya High Court finding her and her publisher guilty of contempt.They were made to sit in the corner of the court room as punishment till the judges rose for the day and fined ₹2 lakh each. Failure to pay the fine would result in six months simple imprisonment and a ban on the paper. Chief Justice Gogoi listed the case before a Bench led by him on March 15. The case relates to an article published in the paper on the perks and facilities for retired judges and their families.last_img read more

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Smoking erases Y chromosomes

first_imgIf cancer, heart disease, and emphysema weren’t bad enough, male smokers may have another thing to worry about: losing their Y chromosomes. Researchers have found that smokers are up to four times more likely to have blood cells with no Y chromosome than nonsmokers. That’s worrisome, they say, because a recent study found an association between Y chromosome loss and a shorter life span, as well as a higher risk of multiple cancers.There is, however, no direct proof that loss of Y sex chromosomes actually causes disease, cautions Stephen Chanock, a cancer geneticist at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, who was not involved with the work.To conduct the study, molecular oncologist Jan Dumanski and statistician Lars Forsberg of Uppsala University in Sweden took advantage of data collected from three ongoing Swedish trials. The long-term studies are looking for associations between behavioral, lifestyle, or other traits and disease. As part of the studies, data and blood are collected periodically. Dumanski and Forsberg compared the DNA in blood cells of smokers to nonsmokers in more than 6000 men. The only factors that correlated with high Y chromosome loss were age and smoking, the team reports online today in Science, with smokers 2.4 to 4.3 times more likely to be missing Y chromosomes in their blood cells than nonsmokers.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)“It’s a fascinating observation,” says Charles Swanton, head of translational cancer therapeutics at the London Research Institute. The findings, he says, may explain why men have a slightly increased risk of death from the majority of cancers that, unlike breast or prostate cancer, are not specific to either sex. But the number of cells with abnormal chromosomes increases with age anyway, he notes, so the loss of Y may not be directly contributing to cancer. “It would be important to know the mechanism.”Chanock agrees. “While the findings are intriguing,” he says, “the associations between Y chromosome loss and shortened life span and disease risk do need to be confirmed in other large [long-term] studies.”That hasn’t stopped the team from founding a startup, CRAY Innovation (Cancer Risk Assessment from loss of chromosome Y Innovation), to develop a diagnostic test that could assess a man’s risk of cancer based on loss of chromosome Y in blood cells.Dumanski and his colleagues are also planning follow-up studies to better understand how cellular Y chromosome deficiency might cause poor health. The researchers hypothesize that the Y chromosome loss may be skewed toward a specific population of blood cells that become immune cells known to fight cancer. Unable to function normally, the crippled cells may allow disease and cancer to take hold.Meanwhile, there is some reassuring news for smokers, Forsberg says. Y chromosome damage caused by smoking appears to be reversible and dose-dependent. Previous smokers were no more likely to have Y chromosome loss than those who have never smoked, he notes, so it’s never too late to quit.last_img read more

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UE coach Pumaren reveals bad bump breaks right leg

first_imgUE coach Derrick Pumaren. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netUniversity of the East head coach Derrick Pumaren is usually a spryly man walking around the sideline with vigor and intensity that can match up to his players.Yet for some time Pumaren has been saddled with a cast wrapped around his right leg during the Red Warriors’ stint in the Filoil Flying V Preseason Premier Cup.ADVERTISEMENT Heart Evangelista admits she’s pregnant… with chicken Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Every 18 seconds someone is diagnosed with HIV View comments MOST READ Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Despite the pain, Pumaren can’t help but joke around with his situation.“I can’t play one-on-one with my players now,” joked Pumaren. “Hopefully in two weeks’ time I’ll be up and driving.” BSP survey: PH banks see bright horizon amid dark global recession clouds What ‘missteps’? BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Palace: Duterte to hear out security execs on alleged China control of NGCP Cayetano dares Lacson, Drilon to take lie-detector test: Wala akong kinita sa SEA Games For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Pumaren on Wednesday said he dislocated his right patella when he accidentally bumped his leg while walking in his home.“The bone went through the other side of the leg, and I thought my skin would be punctured,” said Pumaren after UE beat Letran 81-77 at Filoil Flying V Centre. “I’m starting with my rehab now.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutPumaren said he’s limited with his movement and the most he can do is limp when he’s walking.“It takes time to stand up, but it’s still pretty hard to do it,” said Pumaren. “But I have to do my job.” Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES Amer drops 32 as Bolts take q’finals to deciderlast_img read more

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New freedom, fresh hope replace old hates after Kabul’s liberation from Taliban rule

first_imgStudied Change: Women attend a class at Kabul University after a five-year ban under the TalibanThe capacious science lecture hall in Kabul University has of late seen an effort to cover the scars of wars. Blobs of cement have been slapped over walls punctured by gunfire. Broken window panes have,Studied Change: Women attend a class at Kabul University after a five-year ban under the TalibanThe capacious science lecture hall in Kabul University has of late seen an effort to cover the scars of wars. Blobs of cement have been slapped over walls punctured by gunfire. Broken window panes have been replaced. Only the rickety doors still bear signs of the strife that had engulfed Afghanistan’s crucible of learning.But it is the presence of 60-odd women students in the class, their faces uncovered, who personify the startling changes that have transformed the tormented country in recent months. Banned from attending university, they had borne the brunt of the Taliban’s repressive rule and were forced to wear shapeless burqas.Now they are back in classes, hair covered with colourful scarves and sporting fashionable footwear, including the thickest of platform heels. They still sit separated from male students and lower their eyes when spoken to. But they titter over the bearded professor’s light jab on a mathematical formula he had just scribbled on the giant board.A demure Mursal Abdul Jabbar, 22, is all concentration. Outside the hall, she says, “For five years I had to miss classes because of the ban. I had almost given up hope of ever studying again. Now I can pursue my dream of becoming a teacher.” Her classmate and friend Leeda Din Mohammed, her hair covered with a lacy white scarf, is still angry with the Talibs. “What they wanted us to do was 100 per cent opposite to what Islam preached. We hope they never return.”advertisementUS troops confer with an Afghan soldier at Bagram air baseTill recently such talk would have been blasphemous and invited public caning. But just eight months after Kabul was liberated from Taliban rule, new freedom and fresh hope have replaced old hates and nagging fears. It is a rebirth of extraordinary proportions. Till recently, the Afghan capital looked like Beirut during the years of civil war-flattened and listless. Now it is throbbing with a new vitality.It can be seen at the Shahzada Market where once-drooping shops are now laden with fresh vegetables and giant melons. Where Amale Hamiuddin, 25, has just returned from Pakistan, his refuge for the past 12 years, and now exchanges giant wads of Afghanis stacked on a shoeshine box for dollars.It is visible with the zest with which Zahir Shah, a 30-year-old carpenter, shaves the wood of pine logs to fashion them into doors and windows. He says business is so good he doesn’t go home for days to be able to meet the orders that pour in every day.The signs of renewal are everywhere. The football stadium, which the Talibs had used for meting out public punishment, including execution, still resounds with screams. But only for the friendly soccer matches between the local clubs. Dish antennae that were banned have sprouted a top most Kabul houses and its residents can choose between a bewildering array of 90 channels, including those for music.Beneath the veneer of normality though, there are violent crosscurrents that threaten the fragile revolution. There are tussles between the centre and the provinces, the moderates and the purists, the emigres and the residents.Fridays are no longer solemn holidays when everyone woke to the wailing chorus of muezzins and headed for the mosque. Now most laze at home and watch Hindi movies. “Kabul has risen from the graveyard that the Taliban had made it into,” says 17-year-old Mohammed Idris, who models his hairstyle after Indian filmstar Salman Khan.On working days, the streets are clogged with people. “Kabul’s traffic jams are now worse than those in Delhi or Mumbai,” observes Younis Quanooni, Afghanistan’s powerful minister for education. Outside his office, armed guards keep the crowd of unemployed teachers seeking appointments with officials at bay.For Quanooni, however, the most dramatic change in Kabul is the “absence of rocket attacks and people arming themselves with guns”. He adds with a smile, “The real mullahs are back in the mosques. The fake ones have fled.”More than any other city, Kabul is the nerve centre for the resurrection that is sweeping through Afghanistan. Of the 15 lakh Afghan refugees who had flocked backed to their country after the fall of the Taliban, six lakh-or 43 per cent of them-poured into Kabul.Revival Signs: A damaged school being repaired in KabulUNHCR chief Ruud Lubbers calls it “people voting for the new government with their feet”. It has transformed the sprawling tub-shaped valley into a cauldron of myriad aspirations, lifestyles, ethnicities and ideologies which are both invigorating and intimidating.Beneath the veneer of normality, though, there are violent crosscurrents that threaten the stability. There is a struggle for supremacy between the newly installed transitional Government headed by President Hamid Karzai and the old warlords who are unwilling to give up their hold over key provinces.advertisementBetween the Pashtoon majority and the handful of ethnic minorities that have gained dominance in the new dispensation. There are tussles for jobs between the new emigres and the old residents. Between the new religious moderates and the old purists who recently staged a comeback by banning the screening of Hindi movies on national television. Then there are those who want the Americans to stay and others who want them booted out promptly.Pakistan is trying to stir disgruntled warlords in a bid to make fresh inroads. But it is an uphill task.Afghanistan is at a dangerous cross-roads again. A wrong turn could easily spell anarchy. The tension is palpable in the Presidential Palace, which resembles a medieval English castle with its turrets and rounded stone walls. The ageing King Zahir Shah, who ruled for 40 years before being deposed in a bloodless coup in 1973, returned in April from exile and now occupies a portion of his former palace.Shah has made it known that he is back as an ordinary citizen and has no intentions of reviving the monarchy. But already there are whispers of palace intrigues among the ambitious younger royalty to regain political power.A stone’s throw from the King’s quarters is the office of Karzai, the suave but beleaguered President. Wearing his trademark green-striped Uzbek robe, the balding Karzai is easily among the best dressed leaders of the world. But in the rough and tumble of Afghan politics, his urbanity may be a drawback. Though elected with a resounding majority at the Loya Jirga or meeting of the traditional council of tribal leaders in June, Karzai has trouble asserting authority over most of the provinces.Karimullah, 18, a mujahid, tries his hand at farming in GardezThe President vehemently denies western media criticism that he has been reduced to being the “mayor of Kabul” (see interview) but it is apparent that he is under siege. With the threat to his life increasing following the recent assassination of the powerful Jalalabad warlord Haji Qadeer, Karzai was forced to entrust his security to the US armed forces.Now unsmiling, heavily armed Marines surround him wherever he goes, adding to the image of his growing isolation. Outside, equally fierce looking soldiers from the International Security Assistance Forces (ISAF) patrol the streets of Kabul to keep the peace.Despite them, a powerful bomb exploded in the market on September 5 killing 30 people. Simultaneously, Karzai escaped an assassination attempt at Kandahar. A prominent Pashtoon leader complains, “The problem is that Karzai is soft and makes too many concessions.”It is already beginning to tell. In neighbouring Lowgar province, dominated by Pashtoons, the tribe to which Karzai belongs, his nominee for governor, Munshi Majid, faces stif f resistance from the local warlord, Fazlullah Mujadedi.advertisementEmbattled: A heavily guarded Delili, governor of Paktia, has his hands full tackling the maverick Pakistan-backed warlord, ZadranWhen Munshi Majid went to take charge, Mujadedi, brandishing his Kalashnikov, reportedly told him, “If you occupy that post, this gun will be up your butt.” While Karzai is yet to sort out Mujadedi, another of his governors for Paktia province, Raz Mohammed Delili, faces a revolt from the maverick warlord Pacha Khan Zadran.The swarthy Zadran, a Pashtoon, had ironically been propped up by the Americans to harass the Taliban in the southern provinces during the recent war. Upset that he wasn’t made the governor, Zadran defiantly questions Karzai’s legitimacy and has even launched rocket attacks on Gardez, the dusty capital of Paktia, killing 38 civilians since April. Delili is now surrounded by loyal guards armed with Kalashnikovs and grenade launchers who accompany him wherever he goes. Since the province borders Pakistan, Delili accuses Zadran of being backed by the ISI.Indeed, Pakistan is trying to whip up disgruntled warlords in a bid to make fresh inroads into Afghanistan. Most Afghans resent Pakistan for nurturing Al-Qaida and bringing ruin to Afghanistan. Happy with the unexpected turn of events, India has started cultivating powerful Pashtoon leaders to expand the fair degree of clout it already enjoys in Karzai’s Government.The need is to reconstruct the country on an emergency footing but aid has so far only trickled in.Last fortnight, Indian Ambassador Vivek Katju set out by road to distant Paktika province where he was greeted with a 21-gun salute. The startled Indian delegation mistook it for an attack. Karzai’s main worry is the growing lawlessness in Afghanistan.In Lowgar province, Haji Badam, 45, who shifted to his ancestral house with his wife and 10 children from Pakistan after living there as a refugee for 22 years, already doubts the wisdom of his move. He has a battered Toyota Landcruiser in which he ferries passengers from his village to the capital, Pol-e-alam.But Badam now lives in constant fear of highway robbers after they killed a close relative of his. He plans to head back to Pakistan if things don’t improve. Worried about rising crime, Karzai now plans to request the multinational ISAF to guard provincial capitals as well. Businessmen are sore for other reasons.In Gardez, Azizullah Amanullah, a dealer in used cars, looks like an Arab sheikh with his fleet of gleaming white Toyotas. But he is glum because business is down. Under the Taliban, he says, he paid a flat rate of 20 million afghanis (roughly $500 or Rs 24,000) as tax for importing a car via distant Herat. Now he says, “Every local commander thinks he is a king and demands tax.” So he has to cough up 50 million afghanis to various warlords. It means he has to raise the price of his cars, pushing them beyond the reach of most buyers.Barring a token allegiance to Karzai, the major warlords operate independent of him. In the resource-rich Herat province, Governor Ismail Khan’s demeanour is almost presidential. The irascible Abdul Rashid Dostum, whose troops control the Balkh region, is a law unto himself.He continues to fly his own flag and print his own currency. In the high mountains of the Badakshan region, Burhanuddin Rabbani’s writ holds sway. In the verdant Panjshir valley, the forces of the legendary Ahmed Shah Masood now headed by Marshal Mohammed Fahim, Karzai’s defence minister, rule. Karzai has no independent base and US support alone is the source of his power.New Games: Once used for punishments, Kabul Stadium now hosts soccer matchesFortunately for him, with Osama bin Laden and Mullah Omar still at large, the US and its allies retain a sizeable military presence in Afghanistan. The joke doing the rounds in Kabul is that Karzai had the two spirited away to a safe hideout to ensure that America stayed. The chances of the Taliban regrouping are slim. Apart from the enormous resentment among the local population against their excesses, the US bombing effectively destroyed their firepower. But the threat remains.America still appears serious in wiping out the remaining Al-Qaida and Taliban troops. Around 5,000 US troops are stationed at Bagram air base, 45 km from Kabul, along with a multinational force. An equal number of US forces are stationed at Kandahar. Every other minute, menacing-looking Apache Longbow choppers lift off on a mission against Al-Qaida forces in the vast mountains of the south.Colonel Roger King, spokesperson for the US armed forces, argues, “Our success is not based on finding specific individuals. It should be judged by the absence of largescale terrorist attacks since September 11 and the fact that apart from having a friendly Government in Afghanistan we now have the terrorists on the run.”For Karzai though, disgruntled warlords are only one of his many problems. In their misguided zeal of taking Afghanistan back to the idyllic age of the Prophet, the Taliban perpetuated the purges that characterised Pol Pot’s rule over Cambodia. They turned their back on modernity, drove out intellectuals and professionals and destroyed the country’s economic infrastructure. To get out of the morass, Karzai has brought in some of Afghanistan’s most talented professionals. Among them is Anwar-ul-Haq Ahady, the governor of Da Afghanistan Bank, the country’s central bank. Ahady, a poised Pathan in a pin-striped suit with doctorates in political science and finance from prestigious American universities, was aghast at the state of Kabul’s banking system. When he took charge in March, there were only three computers in operation. The electronic banking machine system he got installed collapsed within a day and technicians had to be flown in from Belgium to repair it.New Dreams: Though the economy has been shattered, many in Kabul hope that the reconstruction will create jobsAhady discovered that afghanis, the official currency, continued to be printed at a press in Switzerland by the erstwhile government in exile headed by Rabbani. Dostum printed another set in Russia. Over the years, the afghani had become so devalued that people carried notes in gunny sacks for the smallest transaction.Estimates are there are 14 trillion afghanis in circulation. Ahady is now getting fresh currency printed at a German press. The new afghani would be equivalent to 40,000 old afghanis (or about $1), considerably reducing the need to carry wads of notes to the market.Equally pressing is the need to begin reconstructing the country on an emergency footing. Although the coalition against terrorism headed by the US had committed $4.5 billion in aid to Afghanistan for this year, so far they have given only $850 million. The statistics of want are staggering.There is a 25 per cent shortfall in schools for the estimated three million students. Of the existing 5,063 schools, at least 70 per cent need urgent repair. An example is the Loghamani High School in Chariker village near Kabul which is housed in a row of tents and broken down thatched huts. The sun beats mercilessly down on the 1,200 students. A turret of a destroyed tank lies nearby and is a reminder of the troubled past.Years of drought and fighting have also seen Afghanistan’s agricultural production plunge below subsistence levels. The fertile Shomali valley was till recently the frontline between the Taliban and the Northern Alliance forces. Last year, we put ourselves at unnecessary risk by walking through minefields to witness a firefight at close quarters between the two forces.Returning to the scene of the battlefield last week, we found the houses that the soldiers had used as firings posts abandoned. But there are signs of revival. This summer, farmer Abdul Wassi, 25, planted his first crop of beans and corn in five years. His lush green fields are an island in a sea of brown wastelands. They are a symbol of Afghanistan’s fragile revival.- Photographs by Dilip Banerjeelast_img read more

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Gilas women’s team scores whopping win to kick off Fiba 3×3 Asia Cup bid

first_img‘Rebel attack’ no cause for concern-PNP, AFP Duterte wants probe of SEA Games mess Bernardino finished with eight points to lead the Philippines while center Clare Castro had six.Pontejos chipped in five points while Jack Danielle Animam had two.The Philippines faces Chinese Taipei at 4:10 pm in the Qualifying Draw A matches.A Gilas win over Chinese-Taipei later will put them at an edge to advance to the main tournament with only the top two teams in each group advancing.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:50Trending Articles02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess LATEST STORIES DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew Kyle Lowry steps up as Raptors clobber Bucks for 2-2 tie in East Finals Two-day strike in Bicol fails to cripple transportcenter_img Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Catholic schools seek legislated pay hike, too Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venue Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Janine Pontejos then finished off the Samoans’ suffering with a long-distance swish bomb from the left wing with 2:28 still on the game clock. The Philippines were just unstoppable #3x3Asia pic.twitter.com/WmwKCi97Hq— FIBA3x3 (@FIBA3x3) May 22, 2019MANILA, Philippines—Gilas Pilipinas Women’s team showed no remorse and ripped Samoa, 21-1, to open its campaign the Fiba 3×3 Asia Cup Wednesday in Changshan in China.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsAfril Bernardino spearheaded the Philippines’ 7-0 start en route to the biggest margin of victory in Fiba 3×3 history.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ View commentslast_img read more

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Sports is an inseparable part of education: J&K CM

first_imgSrinagar, Sep 13 (PTI) Jammu and Kashmir Chief Minister Mufti Mohammad Sayeed today described sports as an inseparable part of education, saying the focus on extra-curricular activities should be realistic and not a mere symbolic exercise. “Our children are blessed with great talent. It is imperative that the heads of the educational institutions provide them a platform to display their skills,” he said while stressing upon making games an essential part of the curriculum. The Chief ministers was speaking after inaugurating the South Kashmir Sports Festival at Government Degree College for Boys in Anantnag. He said adequate funds, over and above the normal allocation, have been provided to the Youth Services and Sports Department for restoration of flood-damaged sports infrastructure. Stating that a healthy mind rests only in a healthy body, the Chief Minister emphasized upon the importance of sports in overall personality development of the children. He said the government has made a new beginning by restructuring the State Sports Council by giving representation to those who have excelled in various sporting disciplines. “Sports has received the least attention and our capacities have been severely under-utilized. I have ordered immediate restoration of playgrounds and playfields so that these are used for organizing inter-school, inter-college and inter-district sporting activities,” he said. The Chief Minister said there is a need to create a very conducive and healthy atmosphere in sports arena so that we can produce many more Pervez Rasools. He asked the Sports Minister to revive the hustle and bustle of playgrounds by formulating a sports itinerary that is strictly adhered to. The South Kashmir Sports Festival, being organized by J&K Police, will be a 15-day event, in which participants from the four districts of Anantnag, Pulwama, Shopian and Kulgam will compete with each other in various sporting disciplines including cricket, soccer, volleyball, kho kho and badminton. PTI SSB MIJ RAK PVIadvertisementlast_img read more

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AICS to take up low allocation on sports with finance minister

first_imgNew Delhi, Apr 19 (PTI Disappointed at the low budgetary support on sports this year, the All India Council of Sports today decided to take up the matter with the Union Finance Minister to request him for a hike in the allocation. The AICS today held its second meeting with Vijay Kumar Malhotra on the chair and decided to send a delegation under his leadership to meet Finance Minister Arun Jaitley on the issue of low allocation on sports in this years budget. “Members expressed their disappointment over the Sports Budget allocated this year and requested President, AICS to take up with Finance Minister for enhancement of budgetary allocation for Sports. A delegation of AICS Members should accompany the President, AICS to meet the Finance Minister,” said a released issued by the AICS after the meeting. The allocation for Sports Ministry got a marginal hike of Rs 50.87 crore from last year in the union budget for 2016-17, presented by Jaitley. The total allocation was Rs 1592 crore this year as against Rs 1541.13 crore last year. “Members hoped that President, AICS would be able to impress upon the Union Minister for Corporate Affairs to amend the Schedule VII of Indian Companies Act 2013 so as to allow the Companies to spend CSR Funds for the holistic development of sports instead of only for training,” it added. The members present decided to request HRD Ministry to set aside at least 5% of Education Cess for promotion of sports. It was also recommended to request Indian Olympic Association and National Sports Federations to provide Medical Insurance Policies to National Medal Winners and International Sportspersons. Malhotra and the members present congratulated Dipa Karmakar who became the first Indian Gymnast to qualify for the Olympic Games for her historic feat. More PTI PDS PDSadvertisementlast_img read more

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BFI announces Boxing nationals

first_imgNew Delhi, Sep 28 (PTI) The newly elected President of the Boxing Federation of India (BFI) Ajay Singh today announced that senior mens and womens nationals will be held in Guwahati and Uttarakhand, respectively. While the womens nationals will be conducted in the second half of November, mens nationals will be held in December. The nationals are being organised after a gap of two years as the administrative mess in the Indian boxing in the past few years have taken a massive toll on the sport. “We are delighted that with the conduct of smooth and transparent elections and the constitution of the Boxing Federation of India, Indian boxing is moving forward. These Nationals are the first step in our journey towards ensuring that India becomes a boxing super power in the next few years,” said Ajay Singh. The administrative mess dates back to 2012 when the erstwhile Indian Amateur Boxing Federation (IABF) was terminated for “manipulation in elections”. The body that took charge after two years of turmoil was Boxing India but could not carry on for even a year and was dissolved in 2015 following a revolt by the state units. The logjam took a toll on the countrys boxers and there has been no National Tournaments in the period. Now with the Asian Games and the Commonwealth Games coming up in less than two years, it is important to conduct the nationals in order to identify boxers who can be selected for training and conditioning camps being held in preparation for these Games. PTI CM CMadvertisementlast_img read more

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Holy Ramayana month begins in Kerala

first_imgThiruvananthapuram, Jul 17 (PTI) Temples and traditional houses across Kerala reverberated with the chanting of verses from the epic, as the annual Ramayana Month began in the state today. With the commencement of Karkitakam, the last month in the Malayalam calendar today, elders chant verses from Adhyatma Ramayana authored by medieval devotional poet Thunchath Ramanujan Ezhuthachan, during the next 30 days in front oflighted lamps. Temples and cultural organisations across the state have also arranged for recital of Ramayana and special poojas during the season. Karkitakam, is the lean season ahead of Chingam that ushers in Malayalis most colourful festival of Onam. Another age-old tradition of savouring the Karkidaka kanji, a spicy mix of rice and medicinal herbs, remains intact among a few families even today. Branded Karkidaka kanji mix is also available in the market. Also during Ramayana Month, Hindus undertake pilgrimage to the four temples of Lord Rama, Lakshmana, Bharata and Shatrughna, located in the Kottayam and Thrissur districts. This ritual is known as Nalambalam Darshanam. Aanayootu, a mass feast for elephants, prepared as per ayurvedic tradition, was held at the famed Vadakkumnathan Temple at Thrissur. Freshly bathed elephants sporting sandal paste and vermillion on their foreheads, lined up at the southern tower of the temple and were fed a special feed made of sugarcane, rice, ghee, coconut, jaggery and Ayurvedic medicines. This is also the period when elephants in the state, especially those belonging to Guruvayoor Sri Krishna temple undergo sukha chikilsa (ayurvedic revitalisation treatment) of body wraps, special diets and herbal tonics.PTI UD ROHlast_img read more

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It’s Playoff Time: The NBA’s First-Round Pairings Are Set

first_imgMIAMI (AP) — The NBA playoffs that start this weekend already have an extremely tough act to follow.The regular season ended with a flourish.Wednesday’s final night of the regular season was well beyond dramatic — an overtime game between Minnesota and Denver to decide the last berth, another overtime game between Miami and Toronto to determine some East fates, a 46-point first quarter by Philadelphia , an absurd 20-rebound, 19-assist night from Russell Westbrook.And now, the best time of the NBA year is finally here.The playoffs are back, with Golden State and Cleveland — who’ve met in the last three NBA Finals — not exactly looking like the overwhelming favorites the league has come to expect. A fourth straight Warriors-Cavs matchup is no guarantee. A fourth straight trip by either of those teams alone is far from certain, either.It all starts Saturday, the 16-team tournament that will be a two-month grind following the six-month grind of the regular season.“I feel pretty ready,” Toronto guard Kyle Lowry said. “We’re ready to go.”So are 15 other teams.Start with the East pairings: Lowry and the top-seeded Raptors play No. 8 Washington, No. 2 Boston faces No. 7 Milwaukee, No. 3 Philadelphia gets No. 6 Miami and No. 4 Cleveland — with LeBron James bidding for an eighth consecutive appearance in The Finals — opening against No. 5 Indiana, a surprise team at the start of the season and one that isn’t a surprise anymore.Cleveland Cavaliers’ LeBron James, left, drives past New York Knicks’ Trey Burke in the first half of an NBA basketball game, Wednesday, April 11, 2018, in Cleveland. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)“We’re one of 16 teams that have a chance to win a championship,” James said. “That’s all you can ask for.”Philadelphia, after years of the rebuilding saga known as “The Process,” has a chance as well. The 76ers are going into the playoffs on a 16-game winning streak.“Take a deep breath, then reload,” 76ers coach Brett Brown said, talking about what he wants his team to do before getting ready for Game 1.Out West, it’s No. 1 Houston meeting No. 8 Minnesota — which earned its berth by topping Denver in the NBA’s first win-and-get-in, lose-and-go-home regular-season finale in 21 years. No. 2 Golden State opens its quest for a third championship in four seasons against No. 7 San Antonio, No. 3 Portland drew No. 6 New Orleans and No. 4 Oklahoma City opens against No. 5 Utah.“The playoffs are about moments, and you just want a chance to have those moments,” Miami guard Dwyane Wade said.For the Timberwolves, Wednesday was a moment in itself. They needed overtime to beat the Nuggets and get into the postseason. It’s Minnesota’s first berth since 2004, and ended what was the NBA’s longest playoff drought (which now is bequeathed to the Sacramento Kings, who last played a playoff game in 2006).“They just made the plays at the end,” Denver’s Will Barton said of the Timberwolves. “Give them credit.”There are some rematches from the 2017 playoffs already waiting. Cleveland swept Indiana in the first round last year, and Boston needed seven games to oust Washington in a thrilling East semifinal series.San Antonio Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich disputes a call with referee Mike Callahan (24) in the first half of an NBA basketball game against the New Orleans Pelicans in New Orleans, Wednesday, April 11, 2018. (AP Photo/Scott Threlkeld)But the most intriguing should be the Golden State-San Antonio matchup — because once again, just like a year ago, the Spurs will almost certainly be without Leonard.Those two teams played in the West finals last season, and the Spurs were up by 23 points when Leonard left in the third quarter after getting injured on a play where he tried a jumper and Warriors center Zaza Pachulia closed out aggressively. Leonard got hurt when he stepped on Pachulia on the landing; he and the Spurs haven’t been the same since.Leonard never returned to that series, and played in only nine games for the Spurs this season.“There is no pressure on us,” Spurs star LaMarcus Aldridge said.There is on Golden State.The Warriors are trying for a third title in four seasons, and will play this first round more than likely without Curry while he continues recovering from a knee injury. Golden State went 7-10 in its final 17 games, and clearly sputtered across the finish line.But the records all reset now, and the Warriors have been waiting to get the postseason started.“It’ll be our first meaningful game in about a month,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said. “Looking forward to that.”With good reason. There’s a trophy to go chase now.—By TIM REYNOLDS , AP Basketball WriterTweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

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9 months agoBarcelona winger Malcom wanted by Tottenham

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Barcelona winger Malcom wanted by Tottenhamby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBarcelona winger Malcom is a target for Tottenham.The Daily Star says Spurs are short of firepower with Heung-Min Son joining up with South Korea at the Asian Cup yesterday.He will miss Tottenham’s next five matches if his country goes all the way to the final.Spurs are currently scouring the market for reinforcements up front and are ready to revive their interest in Nou Camp outcast Malcom.The Brazilian, who can play anywhere in a front three, was on their radar last summer before he joined Barca from Bordeaux.But his £36.5m transfer has not worked out and the Spanish giants are willing to let him go this month. last_img read more

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Canada to admit 340000 immigrants a year by 2020 under new threeyear

first_imgOTTAWA – The federal government sought Wednesday to introduce more stability into Canada’s immigration system by introducing a plan that sets out a gradual rise in admissions over the next three years.By 2020, Canada will see an increase of 13 per cent in overall immigration numbers, with the vast majority coming under economic programs designed to address skills shortages and gaps in the labour market as the population ages and the birth rate declines.At 340,000 people, the increase by 2020 represents the highest intake since before the First World War, though it stops short of the 450,000 target suggested by the government’s economic advisory council in a report last year.Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen said the plan he unveiled Wednesday is the right mix for Canada, for now. The gradual increase over time was designed so the system could adjust, he said.“Bringing a newcomer to Canada is half of the job; we have to make sure people are being given the tools they need to succeed once they get here,” Hussen told a news conference in Toronto.“We have to make sure we have the absorptive capacity, we have to make sure that our partners on the ground with the settlement and integration processes that they engage in every day have the tools necessary so they can plan ahead, so they can adjust to the numbers.”The switch to a longer-term planning approach marks a major pivot for the federal government, which has for decades relied on setting only annual targets. The last time there was a multi-year approach was in the 1980s and it was shelved after a recession.Hussen’s predecessor, John McCallum, had suggested last year the government was contemplating a switch and consultations on the idea have been ongoing ever since.The Conference Board of Canada — among the groups advocating for a multi-year plan — welcomed the move.“Canada’s decision to increase immigration will help sustain long-term economic growth in light of its rapidly aging population and low birth rate,” senior vice president Craig Alexander said in a statement.“Introducing a multi-year levels plan will improve the ability of governments, employers, immigrant-serving organizations and other important stakeholders to successfully integrate newcomers into Canada’s economy and society.”The massive movement of refugees and migrants around the world had seen calls for the Liberals to not just increase economic immigration to Canada but also add more space for resettlement of refugees and displaced persons.Canada welcomed nearly 60,000 people in the refugee and protected persons program in 2016, thanks to the landmark Syrian refugee effort.But while slight increases are planned to that stream over the next three years, the final target is nowhere near as high, with a planned 48,700 people by 2020.Conservative Immigration critic Michelle Rempel said Canada’s immigration system as it stands is plagued with problems that if not addressed, will only be exacerbated by the increases overall.She pointed to major backlogs at the Immigration and Refugee Board overwhelmed by an influx of asylum seekers at the border, delays in processing live-in caregiver applications for permanent residency and thousands of unprocessed private sponsorship applications for refugees.“None of this is compassionate, safe or fair; all key elements needed to give the public faith in the integrity of our immigration system and maintain broad social license for it to operate,” Rempel said in a statement.Hussen said the increase levels would be matched with an increase in funding, but couldn’t say by how much on Wednesday.last_img read more

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UN agency voices new concern over civilians caught up in Colombian fighting

The UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) yesterday sent a team to Bebedó, where clashes between left-wing Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) guerrillas and right-wing paramilitaries are reported to have left at least 12 people dead, including a 7-year-old girl and three other civilians, and 13 people wounded.The majority of the 800 inhabitants of Bebedó, in Chocó province, tried to flee but irregular armed groups prevented most of them from doing so, UNHCR spokesperson Jennifer Pagonis told a news briefing in Geneva.In the Bojayá area, also in Chocó, the situation continued to be critical, with indigenous communities still blockaded by irregular armed groups, she added. There was concern that with the onset of the dry season in December-January, new clashes between armed groups would ensue.UNHCR is scheduled next week to lead a joint initiative with the UN World Food Programme (WFP), the intergovernmental International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the Colombian Government Social Solidarity Network to build community centres in several returnee communities in the Bojayá area.In an unrelated incident on Monday, a fragmentation grenade exploded about 50 metres from the UNHCR Office in Quibdó, the provincial capital of Chocó. No group has claimed responsibility for the attack, which left at least three people dead and six injured. No agency staff were injured and the office was not damaged by the blast.UNHCR is also moving to counter the serious humanitarian challenges facing internally displaced people (IDPs) in slums near Colombia’s capital, Bogotá. Starting this week, the agency is establishing a regular presence in Altos de Cazucá, one of the main concentrations of IDPs sheltering some 25,000 to 30,000 people.The IDPs asked for a more regular international presence, which they say will help them feel safer in an area plagued by murders and human rights abuses and where irregular armed groups have been accused of conducting a campaign of terror and intimidation, Ms. Pagonis said.Bogotá continues to be a main destination of IDPs fleeing violence in the countryside, where decades of war with leftist guerrillas and rightist paramilitaries have displaced millions. Government figures estimate the capital’s IDPs at 86,000 while non-governmental organizations (NGOs) put the total at close to 210,000. Estimates of the total number of the Colombia’s IDPs vary between 2 million and 3.5 million. read more

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Green groups lose bid to turn off the taps on hydraulic fracturing

AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email VANCOUVER – Two British Columbia environmental groups have lost their bid to stem the flow of surface water for use in fracking operations.The Western Canada Wilderness Committee and the Sierra Club filed a lawsuit last year against the B.C. Oil and Gas Commission and energy company EnCana Corp. (TSX:ECA), seeking a court declaration that short-term water approvals by the commission violated the provincial Water Act.But B.C. Supreme Court Justice Shelley Fitzpatrick has dismissed the petition.In a ruling posted on the court’s website this week, Fitzpatrick says there is no prohibition under provincial rules against granting repeat short-term approvals for surface water use.She notes that the commission and the provincial Forests, Lands and Natural Resources Operations ministry have significant expertise in managing the many environmental, economic and social interests involved.Though she dismissed their application, Fitzpatrick did find the environmental groups had raised an important public issue and did not order them to pay the defendants’ costs. Green groups lose bid to turn off the taps on hydraulic fracturing by The Canadian Press Posted Oct 16, 2014 12:29 pm MDT read more

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TAs celebrated for a job well done

As Monica Louie reflected on what she has achieved over the past year, she recognized that her success was not a solo effort.It was with the support and guidance of Brock staff that the 24-year-old Master of Education student was able to excel in her role as a teaching assistant (TA). Her efforts were lauded on Tuesday, April 9 when she received the Novice TA Award at the TA Reception at Pond Inlet.The 22nd annual event, hosted by Brock’s Centre for Pedagogical Innovation (CPI) and the Office of the Provost, recognized the accomplishments of the University’s seminar leaders, lab demonstrators and teaching assistants.The University relies on hundreds of teaching assistants, who aid students in Brock’s seven Faculties each year.Alongside Louie, other TAs recognized Tuesday included Master of Economics student Yihong Bai with the International TA Award, Psychology PhD student Caitlyn Gallant with the Graduate TA Award, Master of Psychology student Jennifer Roters with the Graduate TA Award and Master of Applied Health Sciences student Nicholas Gadea with the TA Award.In addition to the honours, 78 certificates were handed out to 63 recipients who completed various workshops to enhance their abilities as TAs.Louie said the support she received from CPI while completing a certificate program proved invaluable.“CPI has been very supportive,” she said. “The Saturday workshops were great, and I have learned so much from the expertise of staff, who helped guide me as a teacher and a learner.”Though she spent time working in an elementary school classroom during her undergraduate studies, Louie found that TAing allowed her to expand her teaching scope for a post-secondary audience of learners, who in turn valued her commitment.“I had a good grasp of teaching younger children, but being able to work with adults has tested what I have learned in a more dynamic way,” she said. “I am able to actively share my perspective with them. I believe in open and honest communication and showing who I am as a person through my teaching.”Providing an inclusive environment proved particularly important during Louie’s TA duties in the Faculty of Education’s Diversity Issues in Schooling course.“We talked about many diversity issues in education and within society, such as sexism, racism and homophobia,” she said. “I structure my seminars to help my students understand the concepts and see how they have experienced or never experienced these issues, as well as how they plan to navigate them in the classroom and daily life.”Lianne Fisher, CPI’s Educational Developer, said it’s important to celebrate Brock’s accomplished TAs, who support the University’s ongoing commitment to teaching and learning.“Our TAs are so willing to give their time and expertise to work with each other and their students,” she said. “They form an incredible community that the entire University benefits from.”For Louie, the award highlights the beginning of what she hopes will be a lifetime of teaching.“It was very exciting, but also incredibly humbling to receive,” she said. “Putting together the dossier needed for the award nomination allowed me to reflect and appreciate what I have done so far. Thanks to the lessons I have learned from CPI, I have seen my teaching abilities grow, and I am able to continue learning to be the educator that I have always wanted to be.”For more information about the TA awards, visit the CPI website.Brock’s Centre for Pedagogical Innovation and the Office of the Provost celebrated the contributions of the University’s teaching assistants, seminar leaders and lab demonstrators during the 2018-19 TA Reception on Tuesday, April 9. read more

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Growing number of birds of prey killed illegally with no fear of

The charity points out that in the last two years only one person has been convicted under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 for killing a bird of prey. As a result, the RSPB is now calling for an independent review of driven grouse shooting in England and for grouse moors to be licensed across the UK.Martin Harper, conservation director at the charity, said: “The driven grouse shooting industry has, despite decades of warnings, failed to put its house in order – most shockingly turning a blind eye to the ongoing illegal persecution of birds of prey.   “Given we face a climate and ecological emergency, we believe it is time for governments to intervene. A first step should be, as is happening in Scotland, independent reviews of driven grouse shooting for the rest of the UK. Ultimately, the RSPB believes that change will only come through regulation.”Landowners, shooting organisations and anti-RSPB groups rejected the report’s findings.Ian Gregory, spokesman for You Forgot The Birds, said: “This is a cynical spin operation from a charity which cares more about headlines than showing what is going on with nature. The charity’s own figures show that UK bird crime has been on a falling trend this decade.“This trend was made even more obvious this month when Natural England declared that 2019 has been ‘a record breaking’ year for hen harriers.” Carcass of a golden eagle found poisoned in ScotlandCredit:RSPB Mark Thomas, Head of Investigations UK at the RSPB, said: “The illegal and widespread killing of birds of prey has gone on for too long. Current legislation and sentences are proving woefully inadequate and offering absolutely no deterrent to those who want to see birds of prey eradicated from our hills.”Mr Thomas added: “Urgent and meaningful change is needed to the way our uplands are managed, to put an end once and for all to illegal killing and bring back biodiversity to these landscapes. Enough is enough.”The Birdcrime 2018 report also raises concerns over the environmental impact of intensive grouse shooting, including the burning of carbon-rich habitats which increases flood risks and releases carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  Figures from the RSPB’s latest Birdcrime report reveals that in 2018, 31 buzzards, 27 red kites and 6 peregrines were illegally shot, trapped or poisoned on land managed for driven grouse shooting. Hen harriers and owls were also illegally killed in disturbing numbers. The report follows anger after a gamekeeper convicted of killing protected birds of prey in Scotland avoided jail term last week.Alan Wilson, 60, pleaded guilty to shooting and trapping badgers, an otter, goshawks and buzzards and installing 32 illegal snares in a small wood on a grouse and pheasant shooting estate at Longformacus, in the Borders.That came amid widespread concern over a young golden eagle photographed flying in the Crathie area of Deeside with a heavy steel trap attached to its leg.Sixty-seven (77%) of last year’s recorded deaths took place in England, with 12 in Scotland, five in Wales, three in Northern Ireland. Despite this, only one incident, from a 2017 investigation, resulted in a conviction during the year. He added: “The RSPB chooses not to congratulate the shooting sector for getting its house in order but to keep attacking it because the alternative would a focus on its own failings. This is the charity which has for 7 years refused to publish the number of birds on its 200 reserves.” An illegally set spring trap on moorland found by RSPB investigatorsCredit:RSPB The report says the worst locations for illegal killing of birds are the uplands of the Peak District, North Yorkshire and southern Scotland, where the land is managed by landowners and their staff for driven grouse shooting. The report finds that on some grouse moors, birds of prey and other protected species are routinely and illegally trapped, shot and poisoned, in contravention of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, which protects all birds of prey. Intelligence and scientific data from satellite tagging of birds suggests many more birds than have been recorded will have been killed and not found, with the figures offering what the charity describes as “only a glimpse into a far larger problem”.A recently published ten-year scientific study using Natural England data revealed 72% of satellite-tagged hen harriers were confirmed or considered very likely to have been illegally killed. It also found that hen harriers are ten times more likely to die or disappear over grouse moors, where birds of prey are often considered a threat to red grouse stocks. An illegally set spring trap on moorland found by RSPB investigators Carcass of a golden eagle found poisoned in Scotland Short-eared owl shot in Peak District Credit:RSPB Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The number of birds of prey illegally trapped and poisoned on moorland has more than tripled in the past two years, new figures have revealed.A report by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds has found that growing numbers of birds of prey are being illegally shot, trapped and poisoned on shooting estates, amid claims those responsible are growing increasingly confident of evading prosecution.The report published on Thursday reveals that 87 birds of prey were killed last year, including buzzards, red kites and peregrines.That is an increase on the figure of 68 birds of prey known to have been killed illegally the previous year, with at least 81 killed in 2016.However the charity fears the true figure could be far higher, with many illegal killings going undetected or unreported. The report found that in 2017 16 birds of prey were trapped or poisoned on land managed for driven grouse shooting, with the numbers jumping to 54 killed by those methods the following year.The RSPB has now called for tougher legislation and enforcement to act as a deterrent to those who believe they can get away with killing birds of prey without fear of punishment. 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30 years of the music industry in 30 seconds

first_imgThe music industry has changed drastically over the past 30 years. The various music formats–from vinyl records, to 8-track, to cassette, to CD, and then to digital downloads–show a number of transitions over the past three decades. The wax and wane of these formats is shown in a rather interesting pie chart from Digital Music News. The animated pie chart maps each format between the years of 1980 to 2010 based on RIAA revenue figures. The chart is perhaps the best way possible to represent what’s going on in the music industry in 30 seconds or less.As you can see, the LP/EP held almost 60 percent of sales in 1980 with cassette at 19 percent and 8-track at 14 percent. It wasn’t until 1983 when the cassette surpassed vinyl with a 48 percent share compared to viynl’s 45 percent. The CD made its first appearance in 1984 with 2.4 percent of revenue, while cassettes kept on the rise with 55 percent.It wasn’t until 1990 that the CD (shown in red on the graph) came close to eclipsing sales of cassettes. CDs in 1990 held 45.8 percent of the revenue whereas cassettes had dropped to 46 percent. Of course, from there on out, CDs reigned supreme taking 49.1 percent of the market in 2010. The biggest chunk of the other near-51 percent came from downloads. As downloading music becomes more and more common, we’re sure 2011’s numbers will be even more drastic than that of 2010’s.That said, you have to take this graph with a grain of salt since it does misrepresent the role of digital music. The graph is based on revenue and a large amount of music downloads are done illegally. BitTorrent sites are very popular, and it’s not unusual for people to just download an entire album without paying. Listeners claim they’re doing the “try before you buy” thing, but many never end up buying the album.Though it may be a bit skewed, it’s definitely interesting to see the way CDs build up over the years and then begin to die back down starting in 2002 when digital music started becoming more popular. Also, as the 1980 to 2010 comparison pictured above shows, the LP/EP makes up almost 60 percent in 1980 but only a sliver at 1.3 percent in 2010. Is the CD destined for the same fate? Right now it’s still at 49 percent, but will the CD be at 1 percent within the next 10 or 20 years?In a few years, we’ll most likely need a similar graph for publishing, since books, magazines, and newspapers are increasingly going online. With everyone carrying around Kindles or iPads these days, people are reading their news on the go and consuming those bestsellers in purely digital form.via Digital Music Newslast_img read more

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Estate of deceased councillor allowed to continue defamation case against journalist Gemma

first_imgEstate of deceased councillor allowed to continue defamation case against journalist Gemma O’Doherty The matter arises from O’Doherty’s documentary about the unsolved disappearance of Mary Boyle in 1977. Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Share103 Tweet Email2 https://jrnl.ie/4563818 32,132 Views By Ray Managh Mar 27th 2019, 5:15 PM Wednesday 27 Mar 2019, 5:15 PMcenter_img Image: PA Archive/PA Images Gemma O’Doherty pictured in September 2018 at City Hall in Dublin ahead of a DCC meeting to hear from prospective presidential candidates seeking a nomination. Short URL Gemma O’Doherty pictured in September 2018 at City Hall in Dublin ahead of a DCC meeting to hear from prospective presidential candidates seeking a nomination. Image: PA Archive/PA Images THE ESTATE OF Donegal councillor and hotelier Sean McEniff, who died two years ago, was substituted yesterday as plaintiff in a defamation claim McEniff had launched against campaigning journalist Gemma O’Doherty.Eamon McArdle, an accountant who is acting as executor for McEniff’s estate, was allowed today by Judge Jacqueline Linnane to continue the defamation proceedings on behalf of the estate which can sue for damages of €75,000.McArdle’s application had been made before Judge Linnane earlier this month and the judge had adjourned it to allow for further affidavits to be lodged in the case. Today she granted McArdle leave to continue the case on behalf of the estate despite opposition from O’Doherty’s legal team.The matter, which arises from a documentary, Mary Boyle: The Untold Story, about the mysterious unsolved disappearance of the child in 1977, will now go to a full trial. The video was posted by O’Doherty on YouTube where it has been viewed almost 800,000 times.It claimed a politician had in effect prevented gardaí from pursuing a particular suspect into the disappearance of the six-year-old, alleging the unidentified politician had made  “a phone call”.Widespread speculation McEniff issued statements five years ago stating that he could not have been the politician referred to in the documentary “by rumour and innuendo” surrounding the allegation. He had denied having any knowledge of the phone call involved.He issued legal proceedings against O’Doherty in 2016, shortly before his death, and while a libel action would previously have died with the plaintiff, the 2009 Defamation Act allowed for the estate of a deceased person to apply to continue the case. Although no particular politician was named on the documentary there has been widespread speculation in South Donegal that McEniff was the politician it claimed made a call to a senior garda which allegedly resulted in the main suspect not being arrested in the disappearance of Mary near her grandparents home at Cashelard, Ballyshannon, 42 years ago.A garda cold case has been keeping the case under review. A date will now be set by the Circuit Court for a hearing of the case.Comments have been closed as the above case is before the courts.  No Comments last_img read more

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