Twenty7Tec launches mortgage platform product

first_imgHome » News » Twenty7Tec launches mortgage platform product previous nextProptechTwenty7Tec launches mortgage platform productThe Negotiator25th June 20200217 Views Twenty7Tec, provider of tech solutions to the mortgage industry, has developed an in-house mortgage criteria search solution – the first to deliver product and criteria sourcing on one single platform.The functionality supports free format text criteria searches and the production of evidence of research documentation, is being trialled by leading mortgage intermediary firms, before a wider roll-out.When complete, all 13,000 users of SOURCE, Twenty7Tec’s sourcing system, will be able to search product and lender criteria from its CloudTwenty7 platform.In a further show of support for the industry in the face of the COVID-19 crisis, Twenty7Tec will give free access to its new functionality to SOURCE users until the end of 2021.James Tucker, CEO, said, “Bringing product and criteria searching onto one single platform, enabling advisers to use one single set of client data for both, has been a long held ambition of ours and I am delighted that we have begun now to roll it out”.David Lawson-Shah, Alexander Hall’s Director of Risk, Compliance & Tech, added, “With lenders’ criteria changing daily, advisers need to spend time keeping up to date, taking time away from talking to clients. This solution helps to resolve this, helping intermediaries take a big step in the right direction.”Twenty7Tec tech solutions to the mortgage industry mortgage criteria search solution SOURCE Twenty7Tec’s sourcing system CloudTwenty7 platform James Tucker David Lawson-Shah COVID-19 crisis proptech June 25, 2020Jenny van BredaWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more

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OUSU move over

first_imgOUSU President David Barclay has told Cherwell that the Student Union’s new premises are a “far more professional set up”. Now located at 2 Worcester Street, the new offices provide disabled access and improved meeting spaces for OUSU’s groups and campaigns. The move was carried out over two weeks during the vacation, and was funded through a one-off payment from the university.According to Barclay, the new offices will be “substantially cheaper” to run than the old ones in Thomas Hull House on Bonn Square.Figures obtained by Cherwell last year found that the rent for the Bonn Square site accounted for 30% of OUSU’s annual budget.Barclay stressed that money saved will go towards funding “essential” student activities.“The move has also saved OUSU and the University money at a time of great financial uncertainty”, he added.“Not only were the old premises in a pretty poor state of repair and poorly serviced, but the disabled access to the building was not befitting a 21st century Student Union”, Barclay said.OUSU are still working to inform students across the university about the move.Despite adverts and notifications distributed by OUSU over the past month, not all students are aware that the Student’s Union has relocated.“It will take some time to make all students aware of the change”, Barclay admitted, “but I think we’re getting there.Ugo Okoroafor, OUSU/NUS and Returning Officer at St Hilda’s, said, “I imagine there’s always room for improvement but I think the advertising that was done was adequate”.last_img read more

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Press release: Countdown to high speed broadband for all begins

first_img A requirement for demand aggregation, so that people within an area can combine their per premise cost thresholds, to ensure that as many people who want to get connected do get connected Uniform pricing so that those connected under the USO do not have to pay more for similar services to consumers served commercially. A download speed of at least 10Mbps, with quality requirements for upload speeds, responsiveness of connections, and data cap; this could be delivered by a range of fixed line and wireless technologies For it to be funded by industry rather than public funding; and The Government believes that only a regulatory USO offers sufficient certainty and the legal enforceability that is required to ensure high speed broadband access for the whole of the UK by 2020. 95% of the UK already has access to superfast broadband, and the USO will provide a “digital safety net” for those in the most remote and hardest to reach places.The specification for the USO design includes: In the 21st century, accessing the internet is a necessity not a luxury. We are building a Britain that is fit for the future, and we’re now putting high speed broadband on a similar footing as other essential services like water and phone lines.center_img Ofcom now has up to 2 years to implement the scheme, meaning that by 2020, everyone in the UK will have a legal right to an affordable connection of at least 10 Mbps, from a designated provider, no matter where they live or work, up to a reasonable cost threshold.Digital minister Margot James said: Although the USO minimum speed will initially be set at at least 10Mbps, this will be kept under review and we expect it to be increased over time. Ofcom advise that 10Mbps is the speed required for a typical household’s use of internet access to services such as web browsing, email and video services.Government and Ofcom are now working to put in place a number of processes to implement the USO as quickly as possible. This includes the running of a process to designate the universal service provider(s) who will be required to offer the service, giving both small and large providers a chance to put their names forward for consideration. Ofcom will also be responsible for establishing an industry fund that will support delivery of connections made under the USO.Following the creation of new powers when the Government passed the Digital Economy Act 2017, the Government consulted on the design of the USO. The detailed response to this consultation has also been published today.Notes to Editors A per premises cost threshold of £3,400, enabling coverage to around 99.8% of premises. Consumers outside this threshold will be able to get a satellite connection, or would have the option to cover the excess themselves (in the same way the universal service right to a landline telephone works) Ofcom’s Connected Nations 2017 report shows that the number of premises without 10Mbps broadband download and 1Mbps upload speeds is 1.1 million, or 4% of premises, compared with 1.6 million or 6% of premises in 2016 The designated provider will be under statutory obligation to connect people up to the cost threshold, and to connect them if they are willing to pay excess costs above the threshold.last_img read more

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Cupcake Championships: be a finalist for a chocolate masterclass

first_imgThose chosen as finalist in the National Cupcake Championships will be treated to chocolate masterclasses by specialist Barry Callebaut. The chocolate expert, which is a sponsor of the event, will host two classes, normally worth up to £300 per person, covering decoration techniques using chocolates and transfer as well as a quick and easy way to temper chocolate.There is only one way to be there – to enter the Championships. Hopefuls have six categories to choose from: Classic; Chocolate; Free From; Seasonal; Children’s; and Made with Alcohol. You must have a registered UK business to apply and entries cost £15+VAT.A panel of industry experts will whittle entrants down to 10 in each category and the 60 will be invited to the grand final at Bakels’ test bakery Bicester on 14 September – the first day of National Cupcake Week. Judges will perform the all-important taste test on the day to find a winner of each category, as well as an overall champion.The event is also sponsored by online ordering company Hello and… and hosted by Bakels.last_img read more

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Green Day Rocks The House In Hartford [Photos]

first_img***Tickets Are On Sale Now!***Brooklyn Comes Alive is now offering single day tickets, as well as a ticket payment plan for as low as $30/month. When checking out, just select “Monthly payments with Affirm” as your payment method. To find out more about ticketing, VIP options, and lodging, head to the festival website. Load remaining images Green Day | 8/29/17 | Photos by Chad Andersoncenter_img Green Day is currently touring in support of their recent album release, Revolution Radio, the band’s 12th studio effort to date. Billy Joe Armstrong, Mike Dirnt, and co’s most recent road stop was in Hartford, CT at The Xfinity Theater, delivering a dazzling performance of all the career-spanning favorites, as well as some new tunes from the recent release.The music of Green Day is timeless, which is why Brooklyn Comes Alive is excited to present the Dookie:Green Day’s Dookie & Other Rock Tunes set. Kris Myers (Umphrey’s McGee), Ryan Stasik (Umphrey’s McGee), and Mike Gantzer (Aqueous) will work through energized takes on classics off Green Day’s Dookie, such as “When I Come Around,” “Basket Case,” “Longview,” and “Welcome To Paradise.” In addition to performing Dookie in its entirety, the band will also perform a handful of other rock classics by bands like Ween, Weezer, and The Ramones.Check out the full gallery from Hartford’s Green Day show below, courtesy of Chad Anderson.Setlist: Green Day | The Xfinity Theater | Hartford, CT | 8/29/17Know Your Enemy, Bang Bang, Revolution Radio, Holiday, Letterbomb, Boulevard of Broken Dreams, Longview, Youngblood, 2000 Light Years Away, Hitchin’ a Ride, When I Come Around, Welcome to Paradise, Minority, Are We the Waiting, St. Jimmy, Knowledge, Shout / Always Look on the Bright Side of Life / (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction/ Hey Jude, Still Breathing, Forever NowE: American Idiot, Jesus of SuburbiaE2: 21 Guns (Acoustic), Good Riddance (Time of your Life)Inspired by the vibrant musical communities of Brooklyn and New Orleans, Brooklyn Comes Alive is set to take place across three venues in Williamsburg, Brooklyn (Brooklyn Bowl, Schimanski, Music Hall of Williamsburg) on September 23rd and 24th. The unique homegrown event puts the focus on the musicians, curating dream team collaborations, tributes, and artist passion projects for two full days of incredible music both new and old.The 2017 lineup is set to include hand-selected band lineups featuring all-star musicians like John Scofield, George Porter Jr. (The Meters), Vinnie Amico and Al Schnier (moe.), Bernard Purdie, Kofi Burbridge (Tedeschi Trucks Band), Joel Cummins, Ryan Stasik, and Kris Myers (Umphrey’s McGee), Aron Magner and Marc Brownstein (The Disco Biscuits), Mike Greenfield and Jesse Miller (Lotus), Jason Hann (String Cheese Incident), Alan Evans (Soulive), Cyril Neville (Neville Brothers), Henry Butler, Jon Cleary, Reed Mathis (Electric Beethoven), Michael League, Nate Werth, Chris Bullock, Robert “Sput” Searight, and Bob Lanzetti (Snarky Puppy), Jennifer Hartswick and Natalie Cressman (Trey Anastasio Band), and scores of others!last_img read more

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Putting an artist in her place

first_imgIn 1962, a commercial illustrator from New York rocked the art world with his first one-man show. Some viewed the Los Angeles exhibit as little more than a clever novelty; others mocked its use of commercial subject matter as fine art. But for many, including one artist from a nearby Catholic order, Andy Warhol’s “Campbell’s Soup Cans” was a revelation.From the moment she visited the Ferus Gallery, where Warhol’s 32 paintings were on display, Sister Mary Corita (later Corita Kent) found it hard not to see the world through the lens of those captivating cans.“Coming home,” said Kent, “you saw everything like Warhol.”Kent’s own work, informed by social activism, would soon begin to reflect that vision. “She was exposed to this avant-garde art practice right at the very beginning,” said Susan Dackerman, the former Carl A. Weyerhaeuser Curator of Prints at the Harvard Art Museums and current consultative curator of prints. “And she is totally open to it.”Susan Dackerman, who curated the Harvard Art Museums’ new exhibit “Corita Kent and the Language of Pop,” examines the artist’s 1967 print “handle with care.” Photos by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerDackerman is the curator of “Corita Kent and the Language of Pop Art,” an exhibit opening this week at the Harvard Art Museums that positions Kent and her work as central to an art movement famous for celebrating kitsch and consumer culture. For years Kent has been looked on as something of a footnote in pop discussions, overshadowed by male artists such as Warhol, Jim Dine, and Roy Lichtenstein. But the Harvard show places Kent in the middle of the conversation, calling attention to her influences, her contributions, and her unique perspective.“What we wanted to do was actually look closely at her work, and look at it in a broader cultural, art-historical context,” said Dackerman, “and put it into the art-historical discourse.”The exhibit features a selection of books and films about the artist, and alongside 60 Kent prints includes for comparison 60 works by her contemporaries, among them a print by Jasper Johns. In his 1962-63 work “Red, Yellow, Blue” Johns plays with the definition of color, spelling out the work’s title in black and white. His artistic choice “strips the words of their meaning,” said Dackerman. Similarly, Kent divested words of their original intent in her prints, “but what she does then is reinvest them with other meaning.”Kent’s “handle with care,” an eye-catching green and orange print, incorporates a popular Chevrolet slogan that referred to one of the company’s many car dealers. But for the Catholic nun, the words “see the man who can save you the most,” clearly carried a deeper significance.In Kent’s hands, Dackerman said, the salesman offers you “a Chevy, and salvation.”For Kent, any text was fair game. Lines from the Bible, poems, and even Beatles songs made their way into her prints. One of her richest sources of inspiration was the world of advertising, said Dackerman, who spent years researching the show and writing its catalog with Jennifer Roberts, the Elizabeth Cary Agassiz Professor of the Humanities, and several Harvard grad students. “She also used the ads in Playboy. She was a nun, but she was out there in the world.”That meant Kent was tuned in to the artistic currents as well as the social and religious movements of the time. The Harvard show explores how the reforms of Vatican II, the Catholic Church’s effort to catch up with the times, affected Kent’s output. (Among the many reforms, priests saying Mass could both face the congregation and speak in a language other than Latin.)“Characteristics of pop art and the aspirations of Vatican II overlap; they merge simultaneously,” said Dackerman. “Pop art is also looking for a broader audience. Pop art also turns to vernacular subject matter.”Pop artist Ed Ruscha’s 1968 depiction of the famous Hollywood sign, titled “Hollywood,” helped transform the sign itself into an iconic pop symbol, said Susan Dackerman. Similarly, Corita Kent’s design for the Boston Gas Co. tank on I-93 gave Boston its own pop landmark.Kent saw in both movements an important artistic overlap. Her screen print “the juiciest tomato of all,” borrows from Warhol’s tomato soup cans, and from a letter by a professor who described the Virgin Mary in modern terms that included the repurposed Del Monte slogan “the juiciest tomato of all.” Her resulting work evokes the daily and the divine.“She’s just a really smart artist,” said Dackerman.Born Frances Elizabeth in 1918 in Fort Dodge, Iowa, Kent grew up in Los Angeles and joined the Order of the Immaculate Heart of Mary as a teen, where she took the name Sister Mary Corita. She graduated from Immaculate Heart College in 1941 and began teaching art at the school in 1947. From the beginning, her classroom and studio were hubs of creativity, where students and fellow nuns assisted her with her work. “It’s not really that different from Warhol’s factory,” said Dackerman, “except everyone’s dressed a little different.”Kent’s reputation for innovation attracted some of the era’s brightest stars.“Buckminster Fuller, John Cage, they were all there and they gave lectures and they talked to the students,” said Dackerman. Kent even made the cover of Newsweek in 1967 as an example of the modern nun. But history, said Dackerman, has failed to “put her at the center of anything.” The curator hopes the new show moves the artist “back into that art-historical conversation.”That effort began in earnest several years ago when the museum acquired approximately 70 works by Kent. It was a move aimed at making Harvard a focal research site for scholars interested in the artist, said Dackerman, by adding Kent’s work to Kent material already at Harvard. Between 1990 and 1991 the artist’s estate donated her official papers to the Schlesinger Library, which is currently hosting an exhibit of material from its collection. “Corita Kent: Footnotes and Headlines” is on view at the Schlesinger through Sept. 18.Perhaps Kent’s most enduring images are those at the extremes — her smallest and biggest. In 1985 she created her “Love” postage stamp, bright horizontal strokes of color that hover about a purple “love,” and resemble Robert Indiana’s love stamp from 1973. Her largest piece is represented in the Harvard show by a wall-sized photomural and a 7-inch high model. Many have glimpsed the real thing, but only at high speeds — the giant rainbow swash painted on the gas tank along Interstate 93 in Boston. (Kent left the order in the late 1960s and moved to Boston, where she lived and worked until her death in 1986.)Corita Kent liked to strip words of their initial intent, then “reinvest them with other meaning,” said Susan Dackerman. In Kent’s “handle with care,” the artist uses the 1960s Chevrolet slogan “see the man who can save you the most” to evoke both a deal on a car, and salvation.For Dackerman, the gas tank represents the culmination of Kent’s work in the pop movement, and calls to mind Ed Ruscha’s famous depiction of the Hollywood sign. By sprucing up the broken letters, relocating them to a ridge, and highlighting them against a brilliant orange-red sunset, Ruscha’s print infused the sign with new life and meaning. His revitalized image “becomes this iconic example of pop art,” said Dackerman, “and then, in the wake of that, the Hollywood sign itself becomes this iconic pop symbol and this city landmark.”Kent, who spent much of her life living not far from the sign, couldn’t have missed this transformation.“Corita grows up essentially in the shadow of this sign and she sees this transformation take place,” Dackerman said. “So that in 1970, when the Boston Gas Company says ‘Do you want to paint this tank?’ I think what she does is actually make a pop art landmark for Boston.”“Corita Kent and the Language of Pop” opens Sept. 3 and runs through Jan. 3 at the Harvard Art Museums.Corita Kent and the Language of Pop Art Video by Harvard Art Museums.last_img read more

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Before cancer kills, it cheats

first_imgAktipis’ lecture was sponsored by the Harvard Museum of Natural History, the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, and the Harvard Museums of Science and Culture. The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Cancer, with us since the dawn of cellular life, is a companion we may never be rid of, says Arizona State University evolutionary biologist Athena Aktipis. But a fresh look at the disease could bring new strategies for managing it, she told a Harvard audience on Wednesday.Aktipis’s work employs the nontraditional approach of applying models of how plants and animals relate to each other ecologically to systems in the human body. In her lecture at the Harvard Museum of Natural History, “Why Cancer Is Everywhere,” she focused on the relation of cancer cells to healthy ones, saying that cancer cells can be thought of as “cheaters” within a system of working cells. The “everywhere” in the lecture’s title was a reference to cancer’s presence in plant as well as animal life.Aktipis began her presentation by showing a slide of a rare crested cactus that is found near her home in Arizona. “This picture is one of the reasons that I started looking at cancer from an evolutionary perspective,” she said.The cactus displays clustered cells that have a cancer-like appearance — an example of fasciation, or abnormal growth in plants. This led her to make two observations: Humans aren’t alone in their struggle with cancer, and these plants were able to grow and survive despite the abnormal growths. These realities, she noted, have profound implications for human research.Cancer is an inevitable byproduct of cell cooperation, Aktipis noted. “We have approximately 30 trillion cells in our bodies that cooperate with each other and coordinate their gene expression. This is far beyond any cooperation you could hope to achieve in a human society.”As multicellular organisms evolve and the system grows larger, so does the possibility that “cheater” cells may appear to exploit the system. This is what cancer cells do: Proliferate without limit, avoid cell death, monopolize resources, co-opt the labor of other cells, and destroy the surrounding environment. When cancer is present, the rules of intercellular cooperation break down.“Cellular cheating isn’t a metaphor. You have cells that are taking advantage of the cells around them that are following the rules.”,Using this model, you might expect that larger organisms would undergo more gene mutation, and thus be more prone to cancer. Yet this is not true, Aktipis noted. In work carried out during a yearlong residence at the Berlin Institute for Advanced Study, she traced cancer incidence across different multicellular species, including blood cancers and melanoma in clams and mollusks. As multicellular life evolved, she discovered, so did the ability of organisms to restrict the incidence of cellular cheating.“What was required is that life solve this problem of cellular cheating,” she said.Cancer cells evolve to exploit the ecology of the body, while the body evolves to suppress invasions. Aktipis cited the evolution of the TP53 gene, which regulates cells and suppresses tumors. Larger organisms such as elephants have more copies of TP53 (twenty times that of humans) to deal with their body size.“We actually have an amazing multilayer system of cellular cheater detection,” she said. “You can think of these mechanisms as the cellular conscience, the cell moderating itself.” The upshot, she added, is that bodies have a “collective cellular intelligence” that has evolved to keep cancer incidence lower than it would otherwise be. These defenses, like cancer itself, are a fundamental consequence of multicellularity.One possible path for future research, she said, would be to allow that cancer is genetically inevitable and concentrate on managing it.  While the disease isn’t likely to be eradicated altogether, new treatments can bolster “cheater detection systems” and increase the body’s ability to fight invasions.https://www.facebook.com/harvardmuseumsofscienceandculture/videos/815475351995720/For example, researchers are now finding that non-steroidal inflammatory drugs can slow down the mutation rate and reduce the progression of esophageal cancer. Most exciting, Aktipis said, is a new form of adaptive therapy that has been found to control cancers in mice and has seen promising trials in humans. In this case, tumors are treated with drugs only when they are actively growing and are otherwise left alone; this approach keeps drug-resistant cells from taking over.Such “evolutionarily informed treatments” may offer the greatest hope for cancer treatment, she said.last_img read more

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Odds & Ends: Carole King on Why She Stayed & More

first_img Watch Billy Crystal Talk His Robin Williams Emmy Tribute Billy Crystal appeared on The Tonight Show on September 18 and talked about the tribute he recently made to fellow stage and screen star Robin Williams at the Primetime Emmy Awards. He and host Jimmy Fallon shared touching stories about Oscar winner and Broadway alum Williams, who died of suspected suicide on August 11. Laugh—and cry—with them below. Here Lies Love Goes Down Under Switching gears, David Byrne and Fatboy Slim’s disco musical Here Lies Love is heading Down Under! The immersive theatrical event, currently running off-Broadway at the Public Theater and traveling across the pond this month with a London production, will premiere in May 2015 in Sydney, Australia. Rocky Star Margo Seibert’s New Record Rocky alum Margo Seibert will appear on the world premiere recording of the new musical Tamar of the River. With music by Marisa Michelson and lyrics by Joshua H. Cohen, the Daniel Goldstein-helmed show played off-Broadway in the fall of 2013. The album will be released by Yellow Sound Label on September 23. View Commentscenter_img Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today. Carole King on Why She Stayed Legendary songwriter, the Beautiful Carole King, stopped by The Meredith Viera Show on September 19 and in light of the current national discussion about domestic violence, opened up below about why she stayed in an abusive relationship. She went on to say: “my main message is that first of all it’s not your fault and second of all you can get help, you deserve to be safe.”last_img read more

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Energy grants

first_imgFarmers and rural small-business owners can now apply for more than $99 million in loan guarantees or grants from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to install renewable energy systems. Georgia’s allocation is $10 million for loans and almost $2 million for grants.Funds may be used to purchase and install renewable energy systems or to make energy efficiency improvements. The maximum grant for renewable energy systems is 25 percent of eligible project costs, not to exceed $500,000. Energy efficiency improvement projects are eligible for up to 25 percent of eligible project costs, not to exceed $250,000.Feasibility studies now also qualify for grants. The maximum loan guarantee is 75 percent of eligible project costs, not to exceed $25 million. Combination loan guarantees and grants are also available. Complete program details are available at the website www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/farmbill. Applications are due June 30. Those received after the deadline will be considered in 2011.For more information, contact Craig Scroggs at 404-229-5720 or [email protected]; Al Burns at 229-220-5067 or [email protected]last_img read more

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Driving program support

first_imgState Farm Insurance Company has donated $10,000 to the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences in support of the Georgia Traffic Injury Prevention Institute.GTIPI, a Conyers-based UGA Extension program housed in the FACS department of human development and family science, will use the funds to expand the Georgia Teens Ride with P.R.I.D.E. (Parents Reducing Injuries and Driver Error) program.P.R.I.D.E. is a free, two-hour course that focuses on seat belts, crash dynamics, Georgia’s teen driving law, parental influence and peer pressure. It is designed to help parents and new teen drivers manage the 40 hours of supervised practice driving time required by law.Roughly 200 PRIDE instructors in Georgia teach an average of 25 parent-teen classes each month. Since the PRIDE program was launched in 2003, more than 13,000 teens have been reached. Students are also informed about State Farm’s Celebrate My Drive program, which provides support and incentives for communities to support safer teen driving.This award will enable GTIPI to expand its outreach to more communities interested in offering proven teen driving training.“This is a natural partnership,” said Don Bower, UGA Extension specialist and FACS professor emeritus. “State Farm is a leader in all kinds of support for safer driving. Their acclaimed “Celebrate My Drive” initiative complements the UGA P.R.I.D.E. program to provide key elements of a comprehensive local teen driver education effort.”For more information, contact GTIPI at (800) 342-9819.last_img read more

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