Toronto Raptors are first-time NBA champions

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailEzra Shaw/Getty Images(OAKLAND, Calif.) — The Toronto Raptors are NBA champions for the first time.The Raptors defeated the Golden State Warriors 114-110 in Game 6 of the NBA Finals on Thursday night. The Raptors won the series 4-2, denying the Warriors what would have been a third straight championship.Kyle Lowry and Pascal Siakam had 26 points apiece for the Raptors, while Fred VanVleet and Kawhi Leonard each had 22 for Toronto.Klay Thompson scored 30 for Golden State but left with a knee injury. Andre Iguodala scored 22 points and Stephen Curry had 21 for the Warriors.When Curry missed a 3-pointer with about five seconds left, the Raptors tacked on a free throw off a technical in the last second when the Warriors called a time-out they didn’t have, and the last game at Oracle Arena was the last game of Golden State’s reign.Leonard was named NBA Finals MVP, the first player in history to win Finals MVP with teams from both conferences. Leonard won his first Finals MVP in 2014 as a member of the San Antonio Spurs.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. Written by June 14, 2019 /Sports News – National Toronto Raptors are first-time NBA championscenter_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

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HSC 25 Performs Search and Rescue Op

first_img View post tag: Performs View post tag: Navy August 5, 2014 Back to overview,Home naval-today HSC 25 Performs Search and Rescue Op View post tag: rescue View post tag: News by topic Authorities HSC 25 Performs Search and Rescue Op View post tag: HSC-25center_img View post tag: americas Share this article View post tag: OP HSC-25 received a request from U.S. Coast Guard Sector Guam at approximately 1:40 p.m. A Navy MH-60S Knighthawk was then launched from Andersen Air Force Base and the crew retrieved the female swimmer with a hoist. Navy personnel transported the patient to U.S. Naval Hospital Guam for treatment.Guam Fire and Rescue retrieved the male swimmer via jet ski and transported the patient to shore for treatment.“This rescue was the culmination of a team effort between our U.S Coast Guard partners, Guam Fire and Rescue and the Island Knights,” said Cmdr. Stephen Merritt, executive officer of HSC-25. “The rapid response to the swimmer in distress was only possible due to the dedicated training by our pilots, aircrew and maintenance professionals here on the island of Guam and the CNMI. We appreciate the continued support from the Guam community.”HSC-25 is the Navy’s only forward-deployed MH-60S expeditionary squadron that maintains a 24-hour search and rescue and medical evacuation alert posture, directly supporting the U.S. Coast Guard and Joint Region Marianas.[mappress]Press Release, August 05, 2014; Image: Wikimedia View post tag: Naval View post tag: search Sailors from Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 25 conducted a search and rescue (SAR) operation and rescued two distressed swimmers, one male and one female, off the coast of Gun Beach Aug. 5 at approximately 2:20 p.m.last_img read more

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Evansville City Council Passes Redistricting Resolution

first_imgEvansville City Council Passes Redistricting ResolutionSEPTEMBER 11TH, 2017  CHELSEA KOERBLER EVANSVILLE, INDIANA A resolution is passed by Evansville City Council, urging state leaders to look at how district lines are redrawn.The League of Women Voters around the Hoosier state have been urging city and county councils to endorse a resolution for districting reform.To encourage state legislators to develop a new law for redistricting, setting up a commission that would be more transparent when it comes to criteria for drawing district lines.“The party in power following the census gets to draw the lines, they put them where they want,” said Margaret Connelly, League of Women Voters of Southwestern Indiana. “They move people in and out of districts. There are towns where they have been divided right down the middle.”Evansville City Council passed the resolution with a 6-3 vote. Councilwoman Mercer, and Councilmen Hayden and Elpers were the three votes against it.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Three new UK coffee shops open every day

first_imgA study commissioned for UK Coffee Week has found coffee shops pour £8.9bn into the UK economy a year.The UK Coffee Report found an estimated 22,845 coffee shops in the UK are now serving over 2.3bn cups a year, with four in 10 Brits increasing their coffee consumption this year.This growth sees the coffee shop industry bringing £8.9bn to the UK economy, an increase of 12% since 2016.At this rate, estimates put the number of coffee shops overtaking pubs by 2030 as Brits continue to swap lager for lattes.There are now around 23,000 coffee shops across the UK, a combination of non-specialists, independents, and major chains such as Starbucks, Costa and Caffè Nero. A total of 1,222 stores opened in the last year.However, it’s not just physical outlets that are thriving, as sales in independent and branded chains continue to grow. The big three chains contribute 19% of the total coffee shop sales, with market leader Costa recording sales growth of 8%, and Starbucks and Caffè Nero’s sales growing by 9% and 7% respectively.Brits drink 2.3 billion cups of coffee per year in coffee shops – up 4% from 2.2 billion in 2016.UK Coffee Week engages coffee shops to raise money for Project Waterfall, a charity that works to deliver clean drinking water and sanitation to coffee-growing communities across the globe.Jeffrey Young, founder of UK Coffee Week, said: “The UK has embraced coffee culture in a phenomenal way that has seen the industry grow and thrive to the size it is today – and it’s continuing. Through the combination of coffee shop growth and the premiumisation of at-home, the UK’s coffee offer is one of the best in the world.”last_img read more

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Giving voice to the heart

first_img New faculty: Yvette J. Jackson Music professor composes pieces to immerse audiences in narrative Comprehensive study explains that it is universal and that some songs sound ‘right’ in different social contexts, all over the world In massive effort fueled by passion and drive, Harvard College Opera creates ‘Cendrillon’ Nature often serves as muse for Chaya Czernowin, but the composer turned to one of art’s most beguiling sources of inspiration for her new work, which just premiered at Deutsche Oper Berlin.Czernowin’s opera, “Heart Chamber,” transforms one of the largest music theaters in Germany ­­into an intimate space “where there is nobody else,” she said, and where the beauty, as well as the pain and uncertainty associated with falling in love grabs center stage. “I take this huge hall,” said Czernowin, Harvard’s Walter Bigelow Rosen Professor of Music Composition, “and it becomes the soul of somebody.”But exactly how do you craft a piece of music around such a singularly personal experience and make it resonate with each member of an audience of 1,600? Czernowin’s solution is to incorporate all of the voices that simultaneously swirl through the mind of anyone who has ever had his or her heart filled, or broken, by love. To capture that complicated emotional landscape she employs just a pair of main characters in “Heart Chamber” — a man and a woman who fall in love — and two other singers who represent the duality of her protagonists’ inner thoughts.,The new production also includes a 16-person chorus that gives voice to the social forces that often weigh heavily on views of love and marriage. “The choir is actually part of what is happening in the soul of the protagonist,” said the Israeli-born composer, “because they are the voice of society which says: ‘Oh yes, we must create families, we must have children.’”Currently on leave from her Harvard teaching duties while the Rieman and Baketel Fellow for Music at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Czernowin said her work deals with the concepts of “identity, and fractured identity.”“I never believed that a person speaks in one voice, and I never believed that one voice is the soloist. And so I’ve dealt with the fracturing but also the enlarging, or diving in, or zooming in on the psychological depths of someone and really showing the complexity of all the voices inside.”For instrumentation, “Heart Chamber” blends an orchestral score with quirky acoustic elements periodically projected throughout the hall, such as the plinking of a comb as someone runs a finger over its teeth, or the clack of plastic hand clappers. The combination of familiar and unfamiliar sounds is designed to take the listener into a deeper “subconscious space,” she said. “There are things which are very intimately known to the ear, and there are things that are absolutely unknown, and the mixture is very strange.”,Exploring the inner workings of the mind and the soul with her compositions is familiar ground for Czernowin. Her last opera, “Infinite Now,” similarly places the listener “inside of a head/heart/body,” notes its online description. Based on a play about World War I chaos and a Chinese story about a woman trapped in a house, the piece examines “how we continue to live even if we feel we don’t have control of our life,” she said. As she labored over that earlier score, the thought of capturing in music and song something as unsettling and complicated as falling in love was never far from her mind.“Through that time and even before I had the idea of something, which is much more fragile, about the risk, not about the assurance, of our continued existence,” said Czernowin. “‘Infinite Now’ is about getting there. [With ‘Heart Chamber’] I wanted to do something that is much more fragile, much more vulnerable,” where the outcome is much less clear.Listeners and critics have embraced her approach. A capacity crowd responded with a series of ovations at the final curtain on opening night — the first time in its history the Berlin opera house has sold out for the premiere of a contemporary piece. Reviewers have praised the production, with one calling it “overwhelming and touching in an unfamiliar way.” In an online post, Anne Shreffler, Harvard’s James Edward Ditson Professor of Music, wrote: “If Czernowin’s aim is to let us feel and sense what it’s like to be ‘under the skin’ of the protagonists, then her music also allows us access to our own inner emotional states, if we are ready to take it on.”Leading her audiences into foreign musical territory is a driving force for Czernowin, who uses her compositions to push boundaries, ask questions, and challenge listeners to delve a little deeper into something unexpected. Still, she knows the topic of accessibility in contemporary music is unavoidable. Related Music everywhere A student-run show, from start to finish “From my point of view it is kind of sad because for a lot of people who write new music, which is more inquisitive or speculative, we are actually enabling a totally different avenue than the very accessible, chewable, use-and-throw away-thing that we all engage in 24/7.“I am actually very proud if people tell me, ‘It took me four times of listening to your piece but then I actually got something that I didn’t experience before.’ For me, that continued curiosity is a compliment.”During her Radcliffe fellowship Czernowin plans more experiments with form and using nature as a creative spark. She is currently working on a one-hour piece for chamber orchestra titled “The Fabrication of Light,” inspired by the sun that streams through the windows of her Newton home.“I love the idea of light, and how light changes every place it touches, and what it means to have blinding light, or to have only very little light, or colored light that filters through leaves so that it is almost green,” said Czernowin. “All these forms of light and how they come out of each other or change in their environment inspire me.”last_img read more

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Professors debate definition of marriage

first_imgIn a debate Thursday, Tom West, professor of politics at Hillsdale College, argued marriage should be defined according to early American state laws as an institution that is primarily for procreation, while Alexander Tsesis, Loyola University law professor, rejected this definition, saying it did not leave room for changes in the culture.While the debate, hosted by the Constitutional Studies Program and the Tocqueville Program, was meant to focus on the role of the Constitution in defining marriage, West said this question was primarily the focus of state laws.“The Constitution did not really have much to do with sex and the family because that was regarded as part of the state law … and so my focus is going to be mostly on state government policy on the subject because that’s where all the action was,” he said. Rosie LoVoi | The Observer Hillsdale professor of politics, Tom West, discusses the definition of marriage as part of a debate hosted Thursday in Jenkins and Nanovic Halls.West cited a quote from the Massachusetts Supreme Court from 1810, placing the importance of marriage in the idea that every marriage would produce children. “Marriage is intended to multiply, preserve and improve the species. … A lasting community needs children to create a lasting generation of citizens,” he said. Tsesis said taking the originalist interpretation of marriage from the core documents of our founding is a mistake. Instead, he said, the definition should allow for equality for the common good.“One of the problems with using the founding as the determinative is the lack of plasticity that it allows for developments in the modern age,” he said.After reviewing some of the changes in the interpretations of the Constitution and discussing the importance of human rights, Tsesis suggested a way for Americans to both use the core documents from our founding and apply them to modern day times. “I believe that grounding things in the principles of the Declaration of Independence — pursuit of happiness, life and liberty, general welfare — allows us as a nation to take those roots and to evolve in our interpretation of their thought in a pluralistic way … a way that uses the past as a critical anchor to our understanding, and yet does not also close our eyes to the development of American culture, so that those ideals exist despite the fact that this nation is marred by slavery, sexual inequality, Indian removal and non-white inequality,” he said.During the question and answer section of the lecture, Tsesis debated with West about what happens to women with ovarian cancer, or women who are in a postmenopausal stage and are unable to produce children if, according to West, marriage is centrally for the purpose of producing offspring. “What happens after they can’t have children? Can society bar them from marriage?” Tsesis said. “It would be uncountable for the government to deny 70-year-old men and women from getting married.”West responded by saying early state laws did not prohibit elderly people from marrying.“They didn’t have the view that people could not get married, just that if they were young and did not produce children, that could be grounds for divorce in some states,” West said. “For the founders, the question was ‘who’s going to be the future of America?’ They didn’t believe immigration was the answer, like we seem to today. They thought that was what marriage was for, and that’s why we discouraged sex outside of marriage.”Even attempts to gain a child through adoption offer a child that is “no one’s except for the law,” West said. Without a biological relationship to parents, he argued, a child will not be cared for as much.“You can adopt, but that’s not the same,” West said. “It’s not anyone’s child except by the law.” In response, Tsesis said many women “do not want to have children” and that the idea that they do and that women should focus on nurturing children is a “stereotypical view”. The lecture closed with a debate on the validity of marriage in the present and future. Prompted by an audience member‘s question about the legalization of polygamy, West said marriage as an institution is over.“We have replaced the model of raising children with the child support model,” he said. “Marriage is over. … At this point, the Supreme Court can define marriage however they’d like and it would make no difference. Men are being put under a mandate of being forced to pay for their children and are unable to take part in raising the child. So fine — polygamy, incest, what’s the difference?” West said men are not equal to women in this process, and if the state got out of the child support system, men and women could be equal. “The idea that we are in an area of equality is insane,” he said. “Men are always behind the eight ball in custody, marriage and children … and within a marriage women run it because she knows she can go divorce him and get child support.”In response, Tsesis said that marriage is “a central institution.”“I can’t imagine the government will get out of it,” he said. “If the government got out of child support the children would likely suffer and many males would be deadbeats and not give support because it would make their lives easier. But overall I think marriage is an institution and I don’t see any reason for it to end.”Tags: Constitutional Studies Program, marriage, The Constitution, Tocqueville Programlast_img read more

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Farmgate Value Report

first_imgLed by increases in forestry and livestock values, Georgia’s agricultural output increased by $484 million in 2014, making agriculture, once again, the largest industry in the state with a value of $14.1 billion. According to the most recent University of Georgia Farmgate Value Report, published earlier this month, the value of Georgia’s livestock and aquaculture industries increased by almost 36 percent from 2013. The significant increase in beef prices in 2014 combined with anticipated high prices have led Georgia farmers to increase their herds. In one year the value of the state’s beef cattle production rose by $443,394,105 to $1.089 billion, making it the second most valuable commodity group in the state. Coordinated by the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development (CAED), the Farmgate Value Report is one of the most comprehensive annual studies of its kind. Eighty-six Georgia commodities are evaluated. UGA Cooperative Extension agents, who work closely with farmers in every county, collect data that other surveys can’t, said Kent Wolfe, director of the center and an ag economist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “It’s an on-the-ground survey of what Georgia farmers are growing,” he said. “It’s really the only study of its depth in the nation. We collect more data than the federal agencies and on more commodities than they are able to survey.” Whereas larger surveys may not count emerging or niche commodities, like southern peas for example, the UGA Farmgate Value Report does. Southern peas, like black-eyed peas, are a $5-million-a-year-business in Georgia. “We can look at the economic impact of those commodities on the state and county level,” Wolfe said. “Besides providing agriculture’s economic contribution, it provides a picture of how many people are involved in agriculture across the state and in the county, as well as the impact that their businesses have.” The detail also makes the report invaluable for spotting emerging trends, whether it’s an uptick in commercial okra production or a surging beef market. “It gives Georgia a unique tool that other states don’t have,” Wolfe said. The UGA CAED offers the report free to the public. To view or print the 2014 report, visit the center’s website at www.caes.uga.edu/center/caed/. Here are some facts from this year’s report: Madison County had the highest overall farm gate value in 2014 ($521,421,196) with more than half generated by poultry and eggs. Georgia’s most valuable vegetable crop in 2014 was grown in Colquitt County, with $155 million in vegetable production.Crisp County may be home to the “watermelon capital of the world,” but in 2014 Tift County was No. 1 in Georgia, generating a farm gate value of $18.4 million.Georgia’s most valuable vegetable crop in 2014 was onions with a value of $138.25 million.Ornamental greenhouse plants accounted for $265.4 million in Georgia in 2014.Dooly County topped the state in 2014 cotton production with a value of $48.2 million. Miller County topped the state in 2014 peanut production, generating a farm gate value of $33.4 million.Georgia farmers grew $335.25 million worth of blueberries in 2014.last_img read more

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August 15, 2004 Letters

first_imgAugust 15, 2004 Letters I disagree with the Family Law Section’s position in favor of gay adoptions stated in the July 15 News article titled “Family Law Section votes to support gay adoptions,” and I am convinced that taking a partisan position on the issue is more harmful than helpful to our profession.Although the article pretends to consider the children and not gay rights, I do not believe that it does. taking a position firmly in support of gay adoptions, the Family Law Section is, in effect, silencing advocates who represent children and/or who have serious reservations of the impact that gay relationships may have on children. Whether one agrees with the silenced advocates is not the issue; the issue is that their positions should be heard. I believe that no state bar association should take political sides, but rather dedicate its work to ensuring a level playing field such that both sides may be heard and everyone gets representation, including children who may suffer the consequences of being raised by gay parents. Good laws are the product of adversarial debate. Prevent the debate and you are left with one-sided laws.I also question how the Family Law Section purports to represent all members of The Florida Bar when there was neither a referendum on the issue nor an election of the Family Law Section’s Executive Council who voted to take legislative action to appeal the ban on homosexuals to adopt. The article also demonstrates that no serious study was conducted to assess the consequences of gay adoption on children.Adam J. Oosterbaan Naples August 15, 2004 Letters Gay Adoptions I admit I was quite disturbed when I read in the News of the Family Law Section voting to support gay adoptions. The section claimed this is not a gay rights issue but a children’s rights issue. I also admit my suspicions regarding it not being a gay rights issue, but let’s just go on the children’s rights.I feel comfortable in starting out with the opinion that it is best for children to be reared by their parents. That obviously means a father and mother, a male and a female. Up until very recently, it has always meant that. We hear very much about the troubles that arise when we deal with single parent families. That would mean just a man or a woman. A single parent simply isn’t able to give a child all of what the child needs. A child needs both male and female care, guidance, education, supervision, and love. Everybody, other than maybe gays, agrees with that. Look at all the opinion polls and medical research and opinions.A gay couple, obviously, consists of either two males or two females. They aren’t the necessary male and female couple who have been created to, among other things, rear children. You may have two adults rearing a child, but you have nothing else but a single parent relationship. Did any of your committee think of it that way? Are you really sure that the vote did not have a tinge of gay rights involved?The article quotes Family Law Section Chair Evan Marks as saying, “All research says two loving parents is what is needed.” What is the normal, usual definition of parents? A father and mother, a man and a woman.If this is 100 percent a children’s rights issue, I don’t see how the vote could be one that precludes a child from having the above care, guidance, education, supervision, and love of parents, consisting of the above man and woman, father and mother. Both sexes are necessary to provide all of that. Each sex offers something different than the other.I hope the Family Law Section’s Executive Council will reconsider. Should the vote of something this important not be put to your membership?In my opinion, it is very important from another aspect. In the same News there is an article about lawyer advertising. Oh, yes, the problems with advertising and the lawyer image that is presented to the public. We are trying to improve our image all the time.Sorry, but going in favor of gay adoptions certainly does not improve the lawyer image.Wm. A. Oughterson Stuartcenter_img Letters The question of what legislative positions the Bar and its sections may actively support has once again been brought to the forefront by the vote of the Family Law Section’s Executive Council to support the repeal of F.S. §63.042(3), the subsequent support resolution passed by the Equal Opportunities Law Section, and the July 15 News article titled “Family Law Section votes to support gay adoption.”In 1991, the Board of Governors correctly determined that homosexual adoption was beyond the scope of permissible lobbying activities of the Public Interest Law Section. PILS subsequently petitioned the Supreme Court and in that dispute cited The Florida Bar Re: Frankel 581 So. 2d 1294 (Fla. 1991) claiming that, “[v]olunteer sections and committees are the appropriate vehicles for lobbying on issues that do not fall within” guidelines for permissible lobbying activities of The Florida Bar. The PILS’ petition was denied without a published opinion.In its pleadings, the Bar noted that subunits of a mandatory membership organization raised unique freedom of association issues, especially on topics that may be divisive within the general membership of the umbrella group. The Bar also noted that sections of a unified bar, that are often funded with mandatory monies, are distinctive from financially autonomous and wholly separate voluntary groups discussed in federal court cases as acceptable alternatives to lobbying by mandatory membership organizations.As was the case in 1991, efforts by the Family Law Section to actively lobby for the repeal of Florida’s homosexual adoption ban creates the potential for a deep and philosophical division among a substantial segment of the Bar’s membership. As recently as early this year, the Executive Council of the FLS voted 17-7 against lobbying to repeal the homosexual adoption ban on the grounds that the issue was too divisive. Interestingly, only five months later, shortly after Evan Marks became FLS chair, the “divisive” nature of homosexual adoption had been settled, at least in the minds of the Executive Council. It raises the question how an executive council, in less than five months, can have such a dramatic shift in ideology.The recent news coverage, including the July l5 News article, has presented a distorted view that somehow the “unanimous” vote of the section’s executive council is indicative of the general attitude of the Bar. This is simply not the case.When asked why he thought the Board of Governors would accept the homosexual adoption position today after rejecting it in 1991, Marks stated, “people have become more enlightened.” This supposed “enlightenment” has escaped the attention of the Florida Legislature, which up to this point, has refused to repeal §63.042(3). A bill filed in the Florida Senate this spring to repeal the ban went nowhere. The fact that the executive council of the FLS supports homosexual adoption, but the Florida Legislature, which undoubtedly represents the views of a significant number of the members of the Bar, opposes homosexual adoption, is one of the many indicators that the homosexual adoption issue, as it was in 1991, remains divisive.The FLS Executive Council seeks to take the Bar down a devisive path that could prove damaging to Florida’s children. The Florida Department of Children and Families has concluded that children to be placed for adoption are better off in “homes stabilized by marriage.” Opponents of homosexual adoption cite “enlightened” and authoritative studies finding, among other things, that: children living with homosexuals, especially girls, are more likely to depart from traditional gender roles in their dress, activities, and occupational aspirations; female children living with homosexuals are more likely to be sexually active as teenagers and young adults than children of heterosexuals; children living with homosexuals report experiencing peer stigma regarding their own sexual orientation at higher levels than children of heterosexuals; children living with homosexuals are more likely to be confused about their sexual identities and to identify themselves as non-heterosexual; homosexual couples are more likely to molest their children; homosexuals are more likely to separate than heterosexuals; and children of homosexuals are ostracized by their peers. These findings are reported in an article titled “(How) Does Sexual Orientation of Parents Matter?” published in the American Sociological Review by Judith Stacey, Ph.D. and Timothy Biblarz (an examination of 21 existing studies of children living with homosexuals) and an article titled “The Potential Impact of Homosexual Parenting on Children” by Lynn D. Wardle published in the University of Illinois Law Review in 1997.Regardless of what side of this issue members of the Bar may fall, the bottom line is clear: The legislative position being advanced is divisive, politicizes the Bar and based on current studies, potentially damaging to Florida’s children.Douglas A Lewis Naples and Stephen E.Thompson Napleslast_img read more

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Credit union loan zone: Auto enhanced scores

first_imgWe used to hear often from members that the reason they got their car loan from a big bank was the competitor’s rate was lower than ours. We used to discount this information, as we knew our rates were lower. We did our surveys.However, what was happening in many cases was that our competitors were pulling auto enhanced credit scores that would take our members up a couple of credit grade tiers. When we pulled a traditional credit score, we would get a lower credit rating for the same borrower. So we were not competing on a level field.More specifically, here’s how it would go. Our member would go into the auto dealership. The dealer rep would send the loan application to our credit union and other lenders. We would pull a credit file using the traditional model—let’s say the credit score was 680. With a 680 score, we would classify this as B credit and assign an interest rate of 5 percent.Our competitors (all big banks) would pull an auto enhanced credit score. Since most members pay auto loans on time, the enhanced score was in the 700s. With a 700-plus score, the big banks were able to offer interest rates in the 3.5 percent range. Why wouldn’t the member want to pay 1.5 percent less? We lost this business due to not using the same model the big banks were using. If we had used the same auto enhanced score, we would have given our members a better rate, too. continue reading » 29SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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The 5 best (non-credit union) blogs you should follow for great credit union marketing ideas

first_img 41SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Meredith Olmstead Meredith Olmstead is the CEO and Founder of FI GROW Solutions, which provides Digital Marketing & Sales services to Community Financial Institutions. With experience working with FIs in markets of … Web: www.figrow.com Details When looking for Credit Union marketing ideas we follow the trades, and great sites like this one (cuinsight.com), but we also look OUTSIDE the CU industry for inspiration. This helps our staff keep clients current and not get overly bogged down in just looking at what other financial institutions are doing.Check out these great marketing blogs for lots of awesome Credit Union marketing ideas!1. Wordstream is an online advertising company that helps automate the process of PPC spending. Although we don’t necessarily recommend their ad buy services for all our clients, they have an amazing blog, with lots of great Credit Union marketing ideas. For example, here’s a great blog with some cool marketing ideas, including some fun contest examples! Here’s another one that breaks down how to design great Facebook ads. This one has some great tips!2. Entrepreneur Magazine. I love this blog by Entrepreneur Magazine that is specific to the marketing industry. They have some informative topics and I especially like how they estimate reading times at the top of the articles! Very motivating! One recent article that stood out to me… a great piece on 5 ways to get your employees to become brand advocates. Every single Credit Union out there needs to work on this one for sure!3. Creative Guerrilla Marketing. Now this site is pretty out there in terms of ideas. They share extremely creative campaigns and ideas from all over the world. The examples they feature may not all be easily applicable to Credit Unions, but I think they do get the grey cells going! For example, this article features lots of wild ways big brands have showcased their products, often on real world objects. Perhaps these could inspire you to look at ATM receipts or local benches or billboards differently, as opportunities to creatively deliver your CU branded message with more emotion, shock value, or even a little sense of humor!4. As a HubSpot partner, we love their software and find it to be a great fit for Credit Unions, and not surprisingly their blog also offers lots of other cool marketing tips and ideas. This article on managing a marketing budget with a great free budget template is super useful! Or how about this one with great tips and templates for emails that help build real relationships?5. And last but certainly not least… Hootsuite, also an amazing tool that we use with our clients, has a fantastic blog with great tips and marketing ideas. Most of their content is social media related, which makes sense. But these ideas are SUPER relevant for Credit Unions online marketing. Here’s a nice article on delivering customer service via social media. And most CUs are running some Facebook contests, so this one on best practices for being successful with them is also pretty useful!6. Social Stairway Blog. As an added #6 bonus blog, we like to think that although our site is focused on Credit Union specific tips and ideas, we do a nice job of curating great content and then breaking it down into small consumable bites for our readers. A recent favorite of mine… 5 Things You Competitors Can Teach You About Credit Union Marketing Ideas.Hope you found the list useful. Add your favorites in the comments below and thanks for reading!last_img read more

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