City of South Bend releases latest SBPD use of force policy to public

first_imgIndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market City of South Bend releases latest SBPD use of force policy to public Google+ By Carl Stutsman – December 9, 2020 0 1216 Pinterest WhatsApp (Jon Zimney/95.3 MNC) The City of South Bend has released its second draft of their new publicly available use of force policy. The new policy is now up for public review, and they will be holding a virtual meeting to get input on the changes. A community Action Group meeting will be Thursday Dec 9th at 6pm via zoom to get feedback from residents.Below are links for the complete policy and zoom meeting:Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/j/99260089741Link to Policy: https://southbendin.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/20201130-Use-of-Force-Update.pdf WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+ Twitter Facebook Pinterest Previous articleFormer Irish football player Louis Nix III shot; posts video onlineNext articleSurvey: Favorite Christmas treats in each state Carl Stutsmanlast_img read more

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News story: Changes to the Immigration Rules

first_img A new settlement category for Turkish business people, workers and their families who are in the UK under the EU-Turkey European Communities Association Agreement (ECAA). This means that Turkish workers and business people will be able to settle in the UK after 5 years as either an ECAA business person or ECAA worker (or equivalent points based system routes), as long as the most recent period of leave was under the ECAA. This category was first announced in March 2018 after an Upper Tribunal ruling meant the previous route had to close. Today’s changes show that we are able to adapt to meet the demands of our frontline services and ensure we are able to attract people who can bring real benefits to our creative industries. At the same time we are confirming our commitment to those children in need with our ongoing support while demonstrating our recognition for people who have risked their lives by serving with our armed forces. More information is available in the statement of changes. The changes will come into effect on 6 July 2018. Electronic Visa Waiver (EVW) holders will be able to present their EVW in a digital format for the first time, allowing for a smoother journey to the UK. This means passengers will be permitted to present their EVW in an electronic or printed format to carriers upon departure and a Border Force Officer upon arrival.center_img Other changes to the Rules include: The government is demonstrating its commitment to providing protection and support to the most vulnerable people while at the same time encouraging highly talented students and workers to the UK has been demonstrated in Immigration Rule changes laid today.A significant change to be outlined in the Rules is the creation of a new form of leave for children under section 67 of the Immigration Act 2016 (the Dubs amendment). This will ensure that those children who do not qualify for refugee or humanitarian protection leave will still be able to remain in the UK long term. Those who qualify for this new form of leave will be able to study, work, access public funds and healthcare and apply for settlement after 5 years, without paying a fee. The change underlines the government’s commitment to fulfil its obligation to the Dubs children and the spirit of the legislation.The Rules also bring into effect the announcement made by the Home Secretary in May that Afghan interpreters and their family members who have relocated to the UK can apply for settlement after 5 years’ residence. This will benefit over 1,100 individuals. It additionally implements plans to expand the ex-gratia redundancy scheme to recognise and honour the service of those made redundant before 19 December 2012, as announced by the Defence Secretary on 11 June. This will mean up to 40 additional Afghan interpreters and their family members will be eligible to relocate to the UK.In addition to the plans to remove doctors and nurses from the Tier 2 visa cap there are a number of further changes to the UK’s visa routes. This includes opening up the exceptional talent visa to include leading fashion designers. They will have their application assessed by the British Fashion Council under the endorsement remit of Arts Council England (ACE), one of the existing 5 endorsing bodies on that route.The route has also been opened up to a wider pool of TV and film applicants, under the remit of ACE, thanks to changes to the list of eligible industry awards and how recently applicants must have won or been nominated for them. The route already covers leading talent in the fields of science, humanities, engineering, medicine, digital technology or the arts and is open to 2,000 people a year.To make it easier for students to come and study in the UK’s world-leading education sector, the Home Office has expanded the list of countries from which students will be able to benefit from a streamlined application process. Students from an additional 11 countries, including China, will be able to provide a reduced level of documentation when applying for their Tier 4 visa. All students from these countries still need to meet all requirements under Tier 4 and UK Visas and Immigration reserves the right to request this evidence in full and will do so for a random sample of applications.Immigration Minister Caroline Nokes said:last_img read more

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Greggs: 2018 will be a year of record investment

first_imgGreggs is to make £45m of capital expenditure in 2018 as it continues the consolidation of its manufacturing and logistics operations.The business said this would be a record year of investment as it announced a 7.4% year-on-year increase in total sales to £960m in the 12 months to 30 December 2017.Underlying operating profit, excluding property profits and exceptional items, rose 4.6% to £817m, although pre-tax profit fell 4.3% to £71.9m.Food ingredient and labour cost hikes – plus a slowdown in consumer disposable income growth – took a toll on Greggs’ margins, although the company said productivity improvements mitigated some of the pressure. Operating margin including exceptional items fell from 8.4% in 2016 to 7.5% in 2017.The exceptional items included the continuation of Greggs’ transformation of its supply chain, which kicked off in 2016 and is due to end in 2020. While Greggs said the move is creating thousands of roles in retail and distribution operations, it has meant the loss of manufacturing jobs.“We have been able to agree a way forward on a basis of voluntary redundancy in the majority of cases,” stated the company.Last year’s activity included the relocation of yum yum manufacturing to its Glasgow site, which was expanded to consolidate distribution activity in Scotland following the closure of the Edinburgh bakery. Greggs also consolidated manufacturing of small cakes and muffins at its Leeds bakery and relocated pizza manufacturing to its Manchester site.In the coming year, the business will develop a ‘centre of excellence’ for doughnuts at its Gosforth Park bakery.As previously stated, Greggs is also planning to accelerate its shop growth, aiming to add 110 to 130 net new shops in the 2018, increasing its presence in travel, leisure and work-centred locations.The company said the start of this year had been encouraging, with like-for-like sales through company-managed shops up 3.2% in the eight weeks to 24 February, and total sales are up 6.2%.“In 2017 we delivered another strong performance in challenging economic circumstances as rising inflation impacted both our own costs and customers’ disposable income,” said chief executive Roger Whiteside. “At the same time, we continued to make good progress with our business transformation programme, investing in new systems and processes as well as increased capacity and efficiency in our supply chain.“We are successfully developing our product offer to meet customer needs and investing in improved customer service, in addition to accelerating growth in shop numbers.”last_img read more

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Catch a virus by the tail

first_img A tweak to cellular machinery could hold promise for treatment Inosine could be a potential route to the first RNA and the origin of life on Earth RNA errors linked to ALS and dementia Viruses are masterful invaders. They cannibalize host cells by injecting their genetic material, often making thousands of copies of themselves in a single cell to ensure their replication and survival.Some RNA viruses — viruses whose RNA, not DNA, carries their genetic information — insert their genetic material into cells as a single piece, while others chop it up. The latter are aptly named segmented viruses.Such segmented RNA viruses, including several that cause human diseases like influenza, have long been an enigma to researchers: How do they accomplish the precise copying and insertion of each segment? How do they ensure that individual segments are all copied by the same enzyme and that each segment can make different amounts of RNA? Such exquisite regulation is critical to making the correct levels of the viral proteins necessary for successful replication.Now research by scientists at Harvard Medical School’s Blavatnik Institute yields a surprising answer: The viral machinery in charge of this survival-ensuring maneuver becomes activated by RNA from the tail end of the segment, opposite to where the copying starts.The findings, published May 9 in PNAS, identify new potential targets to inhibit the replication of segmented viruses. This group includes several emerging and highly fatal viruses such as Lassa fever virus, bunyaviruses like La Crosse and Rift Valley fever, as well as the better-known and more common influenza viruses.“Climate change has altered and intensified the spread of some serious and emerging viruses to new geographic regions, creating an acute challenge to global health. Our findings identify a critical mechanism that allows some of these pathogens to replicate and survive,” said Sean P.J. Whelan, professor of microbiology at HMS and director of the Harvard Program in Virology.Being infected with the Lassa fever virus, for example, is rarely fatal, but once the actual disease develops, it can cause hemorrhaging in multiple organs in one out of five people. The mortality rate can reach 50 percent during epidemics, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.In the study, Whelan and his co-author Jesse Pyle, a graduate student in his lab, worked with the Machupo virus, an arenavirus that, like Lassa virus, infects rodents, which transmit the virus to humans, in whom it can cause fatal hemorrhagic fevers.Unlike the flu virus, whose genome has eight segments, the Machupo virus has only two segments — called small and large segments — offering a much simpler way to understand how segments are copied in the correct amounts.Previous clues about this mechanism came from research on influenza and La Crosse viruses that showed the viral protein responsible for copying the key segment — RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRP) — interacted with the 5′ end of the segment, which is the exact opposite end to the location where the protein initiates copying. Yet, the importance of this interaction was not fully understood.The experiments revealed that mixing short 13-nucleotide RNAs from the 5′ end of the Machupo virus segments with the RdRP, the catalyst that initiates RNA replication, stimulated the ability of this enzyme to copy the viral segment. The two-segment Machupo virus contains four subtly different 5′ RNAs that each bind the RdRP enzyme. Remarkably, the scientists observed, those RNAs dictate which of four different start sites the enzyme actually uses.Whelan and Pyle say these results not only shed light on an important question in basic virology, but also identify a target that may illuminate how to develop of a new class of antiviral drugs directed at this essential 5′ RNA activation. Related Life, with another ingredient Most antiviral drugs currently on the market target viral enzymes involved in replicating genetic material or in the processing of viral proteins. None, however, interfere with the particular mechanism described in the current study.“Our work demonstrates that both the 5′ RNA and its binding site on the viral enzyme are potential new targets for inhibition of viral replication,” Whelan said. “An important next goal would be to hunt for molecules that interfere with this process and set the stage for new drug design.”This research was funded by National Institutes of Health.last_img read more

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Book of Mormon Star Ben Platt on Pitch Perfect 2, Frozen & Idina Menzel

first_imgAge: 20 “I’m so obsessed with Frozen, I’ve seen it three times in the theater. Not only because I love Josh Gad, but Idina Menzel is a family friend. I sing the soundtrack with my nephew on FaceTime.” “We had no idea Pitch Perfect would become such a phenomenon. It felt like going to theater camp in the middle of Baton Rouge.” Related Shows Current Role: An uproarious Broadway debut as the clumsy Elder Cunningham in the Tony-winning musical The Book of Mormon. “My dad’s a producer [Marc Platt], so during Legally Blonde, we had Reese Witherspoon over for Shabbat. During Wicked, [musical director] Stephen Oremus played songs on our piano. I have lots of memories like that.” Hometown: Los Angeles, CA Ben Platt Stage & Screen Cred: A scene-stealing performance as Benji Applebaum in Pitch Perfect and the second national tour of Mormon. View Comments The Book of Mormon “It’s not every day that you make a lifelong friend, but [co-star] Nic Rouleau and I really clicked. He’s one of the most genuine people I’ve ever met. But he’s a really bad influence when it comes to ordering in food super late.” “I wish I knew more about Pitch Perfect 2! I will be involved to some extent. I’m waiting on a script, but I’m as excited as everyone else to see what the next chapter is about.” Star Files from $69.00last_img read more

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Salmonella and peanuts

first_imgFor the second time in two years, a nationwide outbreak of salmonellosis has been tied to peanut products. This time, more than 570 people have been sickened and more than 1,700 products have been taken off supermarket shelves so far, in what is now the largest food-related recall in the country’s history.Is there something special about peanut products that we should know?Yes, said Mike Doyle, Regents Professor of Food Microbiology and director of the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Ga. Doyle advises the food industry on how to prevent food-borne illness and food policymakers on strengthening our nation’s food safety regulations.Heat affects quality“What we’ve learned,” Doyle said, “is that peanut butter needs heat over 190 degrees F. for over 40 minutes to kill salmonella, but such lengthy heating times may affect the quality of the product.”In contrast, the recommended temperature for cooking ground beef to kill bacteria is 160 degrees F. for just a few seconds.Peanuts have a high fat content, but unlike meats — which also must be cooked properly to inactivate bacteria — they are low in moisture, Doyle explained. The salmonella are protected against heat inactivation by the high fat content and low moisture of the peanuts.Finding treatment methodsFollowing an outbreak of salmonellosis in 2006-2007 that was linked to peanut butter from a processing plant in south Georgia, Doyle worked closely with the company and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to determine the type of treatments that will kill salmonella and what practices might be applied at different stages of the process of making peanut butter.Only one critical control point emerged in the studies, Doyle said. “The emphasis needs to be placed on the peanut roaster. The temperature and time for roasting the peanuts needs to be properly applied and monitored.”Contamination of the peanuts after roasting is another issue. Because the quality of peanut butter can suffer from treating it with heat, the emphasis needs to be first on proper roasting of the peanuts, and second on maintaining a salmonella-free environment.“Food safety requires sticking to good manufacturing processes, no matter what food product is involved,” he said.Chocolate difficult, tooPeanuts aren’t the only food with these qualities. Chocolate also can harbor salmonella if not properly treated, Doyle said. Like peanuts, the high-fat, low-moisture cacao beans from which chocolate and cocoa are made must be properly roasted to destroy salmonella.Doyle explained that the high fat content of peanut butter, or chocolate, also protects salmonella in the stomach of the person ingesting these foods if they are contaminated. Even in the acidic environment of a person’s stomach, the fat in these foods continues to provide a protective environment for salmonella, enabling it to survive, and then grow, when it reaches the small intestine.last_img read more

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7 copywriting principles that will seriously improve your credit union website design

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Derik Krauss Derik is a cofounder of BloomCU, an award-winning website design agency for credit unions. His agency’s design work has received recognition from CUNA (Diamond Award), TheFinancialBrand.com, and others. He … Web: bloomCU.com Details Your website is your most important branch. It gets more visitors than any physical location, and it’s where your younger members will most likely go first. That’s why it’s essential that every aspect is in perfect shape. Not only should you have a beautiful, conversion-friendly aesthetic, but you should have good copy as well. What makes good copy? For one thing good copy converts. It’s effective at persuading site visitors to fill out loan apps and open accounts. Good copy should also help build a positive, long-term relationship with your brand. If your copy feels friendly and trustworthy, then the people who read it will get a similar impression of your credit union. In pursuit of these two noble goals, here’s seven, research-backed tips for writing copy that succeeds. #1 Make it scannableOn an average webpage, users typically read only 20% of the words. The more wordy you are, the more they will typically skim. It’s essential to be clear and engaging. Don’t write walls of texts or plaster your user with words they don’t understand. Hot Tip: Use headings, bullets, and subheadings to organize information and make it more scannable. Avoid long paragraphs. #2 Mind your grammarWhile contractions and plain spoken language can be good choices, straight-up typos and spelling errors are a big no. A London research firm found that almost half of the web users were influenced negatively by big spelling or grammar errors. In another instance, TightsPlease misspelled a heading as “Tihgts” on their category page. Once they fixed this error, their conversion rate shot up by 80%. Hot tip: Make sure at least one hawk-eyed, mistake-catching expert reviews your copy before it goes live. Don’t just rely on spell check—it won’t catch the difference between “our” and “are”.#3 Make your writing match your brand Think about what sets your credit union apart. Do you cater to the gritty working man (e.g., OEFCU.org)?  Is your membership base the especially-caring type (e.g., LifeCU.org)? Writing to your audience is good marketing 101, but many credit unions forget this on their website, opting for the same bland, generic tone and forgetting what makes them special. Hot tip: Read every word of copy you write out loud. Try to see if it sounds like something a real person would say, and if that person would be at home with your target audience. #4 Focus on benefitsPeople want products that benefit them. When you write to the benefits, you are showing users how your product solves a problem they already have. A benefit is more than just a feature or fact about your product. These are helpful to include, but don’t drive conversions on their own. As the graphic below shows, a feature is how much storage an iPod has, but a benefit is having a 1,000 songs in your pocket. Source: HelpScoutOr for a credit union example: Feature: Rates as low as 1.99% Benefit: Save hundreds of dollars each year.  Hot Tip: Review each of your webpages and consider what benefits you could focus on, then use features as evidence to support those benefits. #5 Use power words Some words convert better than others, and not just in your CTAs. For example, most humans love reading the word “you”. It appeals to our egos. In general, power words are positive, affirmative, inspiring, and consumer-focused. They make people feel energized and engaged, and thus, more likely to take action. Hot Tip: Check out this list of Power Words from Buffer Social and see which ones might work well with your own brand and credit union website design. #6 Pay attention to the detailsYou might put a lot of thought into your taglines and titles, but forget that copy includes literally every word on your site. To provide the best experience possible, you should consider each of your wording decisions. For instance, we recently ran an experiment where we learned that users can find things easier and faster when navigation is noun-based rather than verb-based. The result? A website that’s much easier to get around, which is very important to users. Hot Tip: Don’t forget to review and optimize the copy in your menus, footers, alerts, and FAQs. You’ll be surprised what a difference it makes. #7 Share member success stories Some of the most powerful copy on your website can be copy you don’t write yourself. Time and again, testimonials have proven to be major conversion boosters across the web. While collecting them may take a little work, they provide key social proof that’s essential for credit unions. In order to compete with the big banks, you need to show potential members you are legitimate and loved. Hot Tip: You may be sitting on member testimonials that are already written. Do you have some positive reviews on Facebook or Google? Reach out to the happy members and ask their permission to use their review as a testimonial on your site. Looking for more research-backed tips on credit union website design? Get more insights.last_img read more

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Another lockdown possible if virus cases resurge – Palace

first_imgMANILA –  Any sharp increase in coronavirus disease 2019 cases in areas where quarantine restrictions have been eased could prompt the government to reimpose a total lockdown.   Presidential spokesperson Harry Roque made this warning yesterday, saying the public should not be complacent despite the relaxing of community quarantine in most parts of the country.“Nalulungkot kami sa nangyari pero iniintindi namin, first time kasi at ang mga tao, parang nakawala sa kural,” Roque said in a virtual press conference. “If lalabas tayo ng ganyan karami at dumami ang magkakasakit, babalik tayo sa ECQ.”“Kung puwede naman ay manatili na lamang sa bahay,” he added. “Kapag tayo ay nagmatigas at kumalat ang sakit, kung umikli ang doubling time sa isa o dalawang linggo, baka maubos na ang mga kama sa hospital at sa kalsada na kayo ilagay.”Photos showing the number of people who flocked to malls and other establishments in Metro Manila over the weekend went viral online where social distancing and crowd control were not observed.“Inaasahan natin na hinay hinay at dahan dahan lang ang mga tao kaso nga nagdagsaan sila sa labas noong Sabado,” Roque said. “Nandiyan pa rin ang virus habang walang bakuna, hindi pa rin tayo ligtas sa COVID-19.”“Dun sa mga malls na hindi magpapatupad ng social distancing measures, ipapasara uli kayo,” he added. “Marami talagang mahahawa sa nangyari noong Sabado, pero sana huwag na maulit.”Department of Health Undersecretary Maria Rosario Vergeire, for her part, also said that she will not hesitate to recommend another lockdown if there will be second wave in COVID-19 cases.“This is transitioning para mapababa at mapababa ang community quarantine. Pero kung makikita po natin ito tapos biglang mag-surge ang cases natin, malaki po ang posibilidad na we need to do another total lockdown,” Vergeire told CNN Philippines.Vergeire also reminded people the whole country is still under quarantine regardless of the classification an area falls into.“Ang sinasabi at kailangan natin laging tandaan ay naka-community quarantine pa tayong lahat. Kahit na sabihin natin na modified ito, na general ito, lahat po ng areas dito sa ating bansa still on community quarantine,” Vergeire said./PN Commuters fill parts of the southbound lane of Commonwealth Avenue on the second day of the Metro Manila community quarantine on March 16, 2020. MARK DEMAYO/ABS-CBN NEWSlast_img read more

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Area Boys Tennis Regional Scores

first_imgArea Boys Tennis Regional Scores.Regionals at Richmond.Batesville defeated New Castle 3-2.Richmond shut out Franklin County 5-0.Regionals at Bloomington South.Scottsburg blanked Greensburg 5-0.Columbus North edges out Bloomington North 3-2.Courtesy of Batesville Coach Mike McKinney and The IHSAA.last_img

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Mattson, Brown earn PVC Player of the Year honors

first_imgBLUE HILL — A pair of local basketball players swept the Class C and Class D Boys’ Player of the Year awards Thursday as the All-Penobscot Valley Conference teams were unveiled.George Stevens Academy senior Caden Mattson was announced as the PVC Player of the Year in Class C. Mattson led GSA in points (14.6), rebounds (8.1), assists (4.1) and steals (3.6) per game in the regular season.In Class D, Myles Brown of Deer Isle-Stonington was chosen as PVC Player of the Year after a phenomenal junior campaign. Brown averaged an impressive 22.6 points per game in the regular season, the most of any Hancock County player.Mattson, a first-teamer, was an All-PVC Class C selection along with Bucksport’s Ty Giberson (second team) and GSA teammate Milos Sujica (third team). GSA sophomore David Gadsby received honorable mention.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textMyles Brown was named an All-PVC Class D first-teamer along with his teammate and cousin, Coleman Brown. Deer Isle-Stonington’s Don Allen was named Class D Coach of the Year after the Mariners’ jump from six wins to 13.On the girls’ side, Deer Isle-Stonington’s Rylee Eaton and Kaylee Morey were named All-PVC Class D first-teamers. Bucksport’s Jade Leeman and GSA’s Luna Perry-St. Peter were named to Class C’s second and third teams, respectively.The Class D All-Defensive first team consisted of Deer Isle-Stonington’s Brittany Gray (girls) and Dillan Steele (boys). The Class C team consisted of Mattson, Bucksport’s Christian Chase-Hurd and Sumner’s Aidan Weaver on the boys’ side and Bucksport’s Abbie Hanscom, GSA’s Silas Murnik and Sumner’s Hannah Shorey on the girls’ side.last_img read more

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