TechnipFMC receives iEPCI LOA for Energean’s Karish North Development in Israel

first_imgTechnipFMC will design, manufacture, deliver and install subsea equipment for the project TechnipFMC receives iEPCI LOA for Energean’s Karish North Development in Israel. (Credit: TechnipFMC) TechnipFMC has received a letter of award (LOA) by Energean Israel Limited for the development of the Karish North field, located offshore Israel.TechnipFMC will design, manufacture, deliver and install subsea equipment including the subsea production system, rigid flowlines and umbilicals as a tieback to the ‘Energean Power’ FPSO as well as the second gas export riser.Jonathan Landes, President Subsea at TechnipFMC, commented: “We are delighted to partner again with Energean. This LOA demonstrates the value of our in-depth field knowledge and previous experience with Energean through the Karish main development, awarded to TechnipFMC in 2018. Early client engagement, leveraging our iFEED™ capability, as well as our ability to offer a full suite of services and global experience, form part of our unique fully integrated EPCI (iEPCI) offering. We look forward to further expanding our partnership with Energean through the development of Karish North.” Source: Company Press Releaselast_img read more

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HMS Echo Becomes First Royal Navy Vessel in ‘The Gateway of India’

first_img View post tag: Gateway View post tag: vessel View post tag: Royal April 30, 2012 Survey ship HMS Echo became the first Royal Navy vessel in ‘the gateway of India’ in five years when she sailed into the metropolis that is Mumbai.It allowed a change of some crew (the ship regularly rotates around one third of her sailors to sustain her mission away from the UK) and a chance to sample one of the great cities of the world.As befits Mumbai’s status it is one of the Indian Navy’s principal naval bases and it fell to the crew of the guided missile frigate INS Godavari – similar in size to the UK’s Type 23 frigates – to host Echo throughout her week in Mumbai.The visit provided the opportunity to meet senior Indian Naval staff, festively ‘dress ship’ with colourful flags from bow to stern to mark an Indian national holiday, and host and attend official receptions allowing sailors from both navies and their families to mix.The two ship’s companies also enjoyed tours of each other’s vessel; Echo’s hydrographers proudly showcased the ship’s state-of-the-art survey suite to their counterparts from the Indian Navy.A group from Echo’s crew were hosted onboard Godavari and enjoyed a fascinating tour and delicious Indian buffet whilst berthed adjacent to INS Viraat – perhaps better known to Britons as HMS Hermes.HMS Echo’s football team played against their hosts, narrowly losing a hard-fought and competitive game 4-2. PO Andy Gillson said,“I took a great free kick to try to get Echo back in the game. I’m just disappointed that the manager kept me on the bench for too long, otherwise I may have been able to salvage the game for the team.”Which isn’t a million mile away from a post-match interview on Match of the Day…When not in Mumbai or playing football, Echo’s been rather busy for the 16 months she’s been deployed from Devonport for, gathering hydrographic data, surveying the waters east of Suez and supporting the wider international naval effort of maritime security operations and anti-piracy work.Echo will continue her high tempo of operations until late summer when she will hand over the survey baton to her sister ship HMS Enterprise, whereupon she’ll return to the UK for an extended period of maintenance and regeneration for future worldwide tasking.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , April 30, 2012; Image: royalnavy View post tag: News by topic HMS Echo Becomes First Royal Navy Vessel in ‘The Gateway of India’ View post tag: Naval Training & Education View post tag: Indiacenter_img View post tag: HMS Back to overview,Home naval-today HMS Echo Becomes First Royal Navy Vessel in ‘The Gateway of India’ View post tag: first View post tag: Navy View post tag: Echo View post tag: the View post tag: becomes Share this articlelast_img read more

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Golden Letter

first_imgA Somerville student won a gold award at the British Council’s first International Student Awards, writes Katherine Pateman. Yimon Aye, who is reading chemistry, picked up £2000 for writing about how her life has changed since she came to Oxford. The Burmese student was one of two winners out of over 1700 entries to the competition where entrants were asked to write a letter home describing their life, experience and achievement in the UK. Aye wrote not only of her pride at gaining a scholarship but also of experiences she has gained working in the UK, including voluntary work with disabled people. She said, “I only entered because I wanted to represent my country and I know I am so fortunate to be here because there are only a few Burmese students in the UK.” Aye had never been able to study chemistry until she arrived in the UK but has since won prizes for excellence both from the University and the Royal Society of Chemistry. She hopes to embark on an academic career so that she can return home to help bring about reforms in the Burmese higher education system. She plans to embark on an academic career so that she can return home to help bring about reforms in the Burmese higher education system.ARCHIVE: 2nd Week TT 2003last_img read more

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Gee Whizz: Oxford in Orbit

first_imgWhen it comes to anything space-related, the UK kinda sucks, or at least pales in comparison to the monopoly of the USA and the deflated yet nevertheless impressive reputation of Russia. Nevertheless, Oxford is doing its bit for planetary exploration, suggesting that even those dear academics we know and love believe in the classic phrase, ‘if you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em’. A team based at the University has been working in conjunction with NASA on their Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Hardly the most catchy project title of all time, but it’s actually just ever so slightly interesting. Alongside the Americans, Oxford scientists are working on a programme that aims to use infrared cameras to find ice deposits in the craters of the moon. If such deposits are indeed found, then this is the next step in establishing a base on the Moon for future generations. In short, water signifies a sustainable environment, meaning that if the project succeeds, Oxford scientists will be partly responsible for our kids’ kids scurrying around on the surface of the big cheese wheel in the sky, or the honeymoon on the Moon that you’ve always dreamed of. But this isn’t the only space-related venture that Oxford’s been dabbling in. Go one planet along from Earth, and you get to Mars, where even the perfect combo of Oxford and NASA doesn’t always get the best results, as illustrated by the rather miserable failure of the Observer project a while back. Undaunted by this initial lack of success, the boffins came back with a vengeance, eventually creating the Mars Climate Sounder, currently orbiting rather successfully around the red planet. Meanwhile, back on Earth, Oxford scientists are working on the ‘umbilical cord’ for a mechanical ‘mole’, currently being designed to be sent beneath Mars’ surface in order to unveil the secrets which lie below – and just deciphering that mixed metaphor seems like enough work for several PhD students. It doesn’t even stop there, with projects based on Jupiter, Saturn, and even further afield all within the orbit of Oxford’s questing minds.And so it seems that, while the UK may be severely lagging behind the rest of the world when it comes to space exploration, Oxford’s researchers are trying their best to make sure that Britain manages to get on the planetary map. Even if you need a telescope to see it.by Gareth Peterslast_img read more

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Council to Consider Renovation Plan for Ocean City’s Public Safety Building

first_imgBy Donald WittkowskiOcean City’s century-old Public Safety Building, once seemingly fated for demolition, would instead be saved, modernized and expanded under a plan proposed by Mayor Jay Gillian.Gillian’s administration will seek City Council approval Thursday night for an architectural contract to design a makeover of the antiquated building at Eighth Street and Central Avenue.“This is just the first step in a process to modernize a facility that is now more than a century old and completely out of compliance with federal flood requirements,” Gillian said in his weekly message posted on the city’s website.He explained that the project would include extensive renovations to the upper floors of the building and construction of a new addition next to it. Ground-level parking would be created beneath both structures.The brick building, a former school, houses the police department and municipal court. Its renovation and expansion into a modern complex reflects the city’s commitment to public safety, the mayor said.“For the sake of the public and police department, I feel it’s important to move forward with this important project,” he said in his statement.Last January, Gillian had proposed replacing the old building with an entirely new structure as part of the city’s five-year, $98.5 million capital plan. At that time, he had proposed spending $1 million this year for designs and engineering, followed by the construction of a new $9 million building in 2017.The project was proposed on land across the street that currently serves as a parking lot for City Hall. Gillian, though, backed away from that plan after local merchants complained it would rob the downtown business district of parking.The revised plan to save and expand the building does not eliminate any parking. In addition, it would not require the purchase of land or affect any other parts of the city, Gillian said.By reconstructing the building, the city will preserve a historic landmark and make it resistant to flooding, he noted.“It will help the city meet the required 500-year flood requirement for a public safety building,” he said. “It’s the most cost-effective approach.”The estimated price tag of the building’s renovation and expansion has not yet been announced. More discussion is expected at Council’s 7 p.m. meeting Thursday at City Hall.Council will consider approving a $106,500 contract for Czar Engineering LLC of Egg Harbor Township to design the project. Czar will also conduct a cost analysis.Also on Council’s agenda is an ordinance that would require the city’s historic homes to fall under the same propery maintenance requirements as every other house in town.The measure brings historic homes in line with the property standards that apply to non-historic residential and commercial buildings.It would ensure that the city’s property maintenance code applies equally to every building, historic or otherwise, Business Administrator Jim Mallon said.Mainly, it would allow the city to issue violation notices to the owners of historic homes if their property becomes unsightly, such as overgrown grass or trash in the yard, Mallon said.Council introduced the ordinance in October. A public hearing will be held Thursday before Council is expected to take a final vote on the measure.The ordinance would incorporate the homes within the Historic District under the umbrella of the city’s property maintenance code. The district’s boundaries roughly run from Third to Eighth streets between Ocean and Central avenues, although there are some offshoots.last_img read more

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knowing your business

first_imgWhile I sit at my desk writing this, a hard-working electrician doing a job for me has just asked: “What kind of government is it that penalises the working people to give to the lazy?” There is no answer to that except to say, “A British one”.And one question remains unanswered in my mind. Why is it that everyone I speak with – both employers and employees – all seem to feel the same. Yet we, the majority, are still ruled by the minority.Back to business, Neville, my MD, and I were having a brief discussion about our spending plans for the year, starting with the inevitable wish list, followed by what we can afford to make us the best return on capital.Now I know you will say there are many better ways of getting higher returns on capital than investing it in bakery. That may be true, but if we do not invest, we shall end up losing everything. You could say we are on a treadmill and that, if we stop, we shall not succeed and our labour costs will spiral out of control.DON’T BANK ON THE BANKOne point I made strongly to Neville, based upon years of bitter experience, is never trust your bank. When you are doing well, they will give you, within reason, anything you ask for. Then, having built up a good working relationship with your bank or area manager, he or she gets promoted and the next guy can be a right son-of-a-gun.Always borrow for capital equipment on lease or hire purchase. I prefer the latter as it is simple, fixed payments and it is yours at the end of the period. Never buy capital equipment by using an overdraft that is a short-term loan, which can be rescinded on demand by the bank. Remember that old adage: never borrow short to spend long. The way I see it, a fool and his money are lucky to get together in the first place.Always try to be realistic when doing a budget: if you have a boomerang that won’t come back, just accept the fact that it is a stick.beware tax schemesI am always wary of schemes that appear to have such great tax advantages to me. But the reality is that you have to make large profits before the tax advantages kick in.With a new year here, a vision of the future is important. Otherwise we’ll be going nowhere. So what are the secrets for success? Well we must have the right management team, always be looking to control and cut costs and, I suppose, know the business we are in.The latter may sound obvious, yet in many ways is the most difficult to define. Are we bakers or fast food operators, retailers or manufacturers? We all know we are a bit of each, and while each part of the company is interdependent on the other, which should take priority?In my opinion, if you are a retailer the retail side of the business should always have priority. After all, even if you make the best products in the country, if people don’t buy them, you have no money just products. nlast_img read more

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Festival At The Farm Organizer James Macdonald On Creating A Lasting Legacy In A Truly Special Location

first_imgThe second annual Festival at the Farm is once again set to take place on Prowse Farm in Canton, MA on September 16th and 17th, boasting a lineup that features an eclectic mix of in-demand artists like Lettuce, The Wood Brothers, Lee Fields & The Expressions, Martin Sexton, The Marcus King Band, Brett Dennen, Ryan Montbleau, Kat Wright, and many more. The event also has focused on curating a local, homegrown feel in a family-friendly environment, enlisting local businesses, farmers, and food and craft beer vendors to get involved.As the event continues to draw closer, we were able to chat with event organizer and producer James Macdonald of Six Chair Productions about Festival at the Farm, the past endeavors at Prowse Farm that led to this festival incarnation, and how he has made it his mission to work with the local community to create a festival that has the neighborhood vibe while also appealing to an larger audience.Live For Live Music: Have any of the artists on this year’s bill have played the festival before?James Macdonald: Yes, in fact we have a handful of artists who have played at Prowse Farm going back to the days when I was the Festival Director for the Life Is Good Festival. Artists making a return trip to the farm are Martin Sexton, the Wood Brothers, Brett Dennen, Ryan Montbleau, Kat Wright, Dwight and Nicole, Session Americana and Josh and the Jamtones doing the kids’ thing. Between Life Is Good Festival and last year’s Festival at the Farm, we’ve created a nice little family bond and the artists really seem to enjoy the location and vibe.L4LM: Can you tell us a little about the history of Festival at the Farm?JM: The festival began last summer, but I have been producing events at the site going back to 2010. As the festival director of the Life is Good Festival (2010-2013), I worked to create a special event for the Boston-area at this really special location. Fast forward to 2016, the Life is Good Festival was no longer…but I felt the site was just too beautiful and convenient to not continue producing a similarly-minded music festival. So in an effort to continue bringing people back to the Farm for live music, I created Festival at the Farm. Second time’s a charm?…L4LM: It seems organizers, artists, and fans alike have developed a connection to this venue. How was the Prowse Farm location originally chosen?JM: There are very few places in the Boston area that are as convenient and beautiful in direct proximity to the city. We’re less than 20 minutes away and we found the site in 2009 in an effort to expand the Life is Good Festival. Six festivals at the farm later…we really feel like we have a beautiful home in an amazing place to see music. There’s a 685 foot cliff directly behind the stages and a beautiful green lawn. There’s just something magical about seeing music in a place that inspires you.L4LM: This year boasts a particularly solid lineup of acts from across the musical spectrum. Which sets are you most excited to see?JM: As the event’s producer I feel a special sense of excitement about all of the acts, but I’m especially looking forward to my friends Ryan Montbleau and Kat Wright. I’m also proud of the fact that we can represent the Boston music scene so well with so many bands from the area. For me, it’s just about seeing these bands discover this beautiful location and vibe. And, of course, there’s a lot of fun seeing the little kids rock out to Josh and The Jamtones.L4LM: Outside of the music, the fest features some really great local food and craft beer options. How important is it to work with the local community in building a successful event?JM: This event is really all about community. It’s independently owned, in fact it’s sort of a “start-up” story in and of itself. So the local farmers and restaurants on site share a kinship what we are trying to do – we have all brought great ideas out to the community and I am so proud to partner with local businesses that believe in their own mission.L4LM: Tell us a little about the vendors and sponsors Festival at the Farm works with.JM: The festival wouldn’t be possible without our friends at Pete and Gerry’s Organic Eggs. People thought it was a little crazy when I told them that we had developed such a great partnership. Usually music festivals focus heavily on a different type of partner. Pete and Gerry’s are an incredible business, supporting local farmers throughout New England, standing up for organic and humane farming practices. I truly am inspired by the things they have done and the things they believe in. Yes, I am gushing about an egg company, but they are the type of business this world needs.L4LM: Not every music festival is entirely family friendly. To what extent did creating an environment for families with children factor into your overall concept and goals for Festival at the Farm?JM: Music festivals just get lumped into this idea that it’s all about sex, drugs and rock ‘n’ roll …or that they are the exclusive domain of teenagers and twenty-somethings. But it’s important to me that my own daughter gets to experience the joy and camaraderie a music festival delivers. I think it’s important to other people, too. Those are our people and we want them to join us. Going back to my life in the good ol’ festival days, I realized that there’s just absolutely nothing that will bring a smile to your face quicker than a five-year-old rocking out at a music festival. So, I just wanted to create a space where mom and dad could maybe have a beer and catch one of their favorite bands while the little ones go bananas and have fun in their own way. Music festivals are for everybody and I enjoy working hard to bring that concept to life.L4LM: There is something to be said about the natural beauty of New England in the Fall. Was the choice to put on an event in early autumn something that was decided on from the start?JM: It’s all about the weather. You just can’t beat New England in the late summer/early fall. Plus, I’m too busy going to all the other amazing summertime New England music to throw my own event [laughs].L4LM: Thanks so much for your time, James. Best of luck this year!Enter to win a free pair of tickets to the upcoming Festival at the Farm below:Single-day tickets are $45, with two-days going for $75. Kids under 5 are free, while tickets for children 6-12 are $15 (single-day) and $20 (two-day). There is a special VIP option that includes a special dinner served by Commonwealth Cambridge chef/owner Nookie Postal. Tickets for Festival at the Farm are currently on-sale and can be purchased here. For additional information and event updates, join the Facebook Event page.If you are traveling from the Boston area, leave your keys at home! The festival has teamed up with Skedaddle to provide an easy group transportation option to the festival. Buses leave from South Street in Boston, and back. Snag your seat on a route! Use promo code FARM10 for $10 off your seat! Purchase a spot on the bus here!Festival At The Farm 2017 LineupLettuceThe Wood BrothersBrett DennenLee Fields & The ExpressionsMartin SextonRyan MontbleauThe Marcus King BandSession AmericanaThe Ballroom ThievesKat WrightDwight and NicoleTwisted PineJulie RhodesMatthew Stubbs and the AntiguasLuxDeluxeSean McConnellJosh and the Jamtones[cover photo courtesy of Owen S. Jordan]last_img read more

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Primus Shares New Album “The Desaturating Seven” Inspired By Rainbow Goblins

first_imgPrimus is hitting the road this month in celebration of their new album The Desaturating Seven, which came out today via ATO Records. The new record marks the first since the band’s 2014 Primus & The Chocolate Factory with the Fungi Ensemble, the first original material since 2011’s Green Naugahyde, and their ninth LP together.The inspiration for The Desaturating Seven comes from a 1978 children’s book, The Rainbow Goblins. The book’s “vibrant and intense and eerie and somewhat creepy” artwork impressed bassist and frontman Les Claypool (while reading it to his children) to the point of making it into music. “I remember being incredibly impressed with the artwork and the storyline and the content and the message, and I thought, ‘Wow, this would make a great piece of music,’” Claypool told Rolling Stone in a recent interview. “As I’m getting older, I’m realizing I need to start knocking some of these things off my list. So we did the Willy Wonka soundtrack a couple years back, and this was a project I wanted to do.”He continued, “I would look at the artwork and read the lyrics, and it’s very difficult to sing about goblins and rainbows and not have it come off being a little cornball…So I was tiptoeing the line of not necessarily being literal, but referring to elements of the story and using it more as a metaphor, when I could.”Much like their Primus & The Chocolate Factory tour, Primus will reincarnate the book’s rainbow imagery on their upcoming tour, which will begin October 20 in San Antonio and extend through November 11 in Miami. The show will consist of two sets: the first set will sift through their entire catalog, and the second will play through The Desaturating Seven in its entirety. The album’s vinyl edition will also be produced in “seven-color green splatter format.” Head here to the band’s website for more information, and read the full interview on Rolling Stone.Primus “The Desaturating Seven” Tour DatesOctober 20 – San Antonio, TX @ Sunken GardensOctober 21 – Houston, TX @ White Oak LawnOctober 22 – Austin, TX @ ACL LiveOctober 24 – Nashville, TN @ War MemorialOctober 27 – Albany, NY @ Palace TheaterOctober 29 – Port Chester, NY @ Capitol TheaterOctober 31 – Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn SteelNovember 2 – Akron, OH @ Goodyear TheaterNovember 3 – Cincinnati, OH @ The Taft TheaterNovember 4 – Louisville, KY @ Palace TheaterNovember 5 – St. Louis, MO @ Peabody TheaterNovember 7 – Knoxville, TN @ Tennessee TheaterNovember 9 – Atlanta, GA @ TabernacleNovember 10 – Orlando, FL @ Hard Rock HotelNovember 11 – Miami, FL @ Fillmore MiamiNovember 13 – New Orleans, LA @ Civic TheatreDecember 29, 30 – Los Angeles, CA @ The Wilternlast_img read more

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Researchers find drug that could halt kidney failure

first_imgA drug approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis may also turn out to be the first targeted therapy for one of the most common forms of kidney disease, a condition that almost inevitably leads to kidney failure. A team led by researchers at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) is reporting that treatment with abatacept (Orencia) appeared to halt the course of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) in five patients, preventing four from losing transplanted kidneys and achieving disease remission in the fifth. The report was issued online in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).“We identified abatacept as the first personalized, targeted treatment for kidney disease and specifically for FSGS, a devastating and largely untreatable disease” said Peter Mundel of the Division of Nephrology in the MGH Department of Medicine. “We also identified a biomarker that helps us discern which patients are most likely to benefit from therapy with abatacept.”Mundel is senior author of the NEJM paper and an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS).FSGS is characterized by the formation of scar tissue in the glomeruli, the kidney’s essential filtering units. Some forms of FSGS are inherited and some have no known cause, but the vast majority of cases develop in individuals with hypertension, obesity, or diabetes. Although the underlying mechanism is unclear, FSGS disrupts the function of podocytes, cells within the glomeruli that are crucial to kidney function. While treatment with steroids and some immunosuppressive drugs helps some patients, the drugs’ side effects make long-term use problematic.Previous research by Mundel’s team found that the expression on podocytes of an immune molecule called B7-1 signaled the breakdown of the kidney’s filtering function, leading to protein leakage into the urine (proteinuria) and ultimately to kidney failure. Currently approved to treat rheumatoid arthritis and being studied for other conditions, abatacept inhibits the activity of B7-1, a molecule that is not expressed in healthy podocytes. After in vitro tests indicated that abatacept blocked the primary pathogenic effect of B7-1 expression in podocytes, the team tested treatment with the drug in five FSGS patients, four with recurrent disease affecting a transplanted kidney and one with treatment-resistant disease who was at high risk for kidney failure.In all five patients, abatacept treatment induced remission of FSGS-caused proteinuria. Two of those with recurrent disease have remained in remission for three and four years, respectively, after a single dose of abatacept. The other two required a second dose when proteinuria reappeared a few weeks later and have been in remission for 10 and 12 months, respectively. The patient with high-risk, treatment-resistant disease, who is being treated at MGH, went into remission for the first time in more than a year, continues in remission a year later, and has resumed a normal lifestyle.  While she still receives monthly doses of abatacept, she no longer needs the high-dose steroids and immunosuppressive drugs she had depended on, some of which actually increase the risk for kidney failure.Mundel explained that, while a large-scale clinical trial is needed, he and his colleagues are hopeful that abatacept will prove an effective treatment for kidney disease characterized by B7-1 expression on podocytes. “We have a decade of good experience with the use of abatacept for rheumatoid arthritis, so we have every reason to believe that it will be an excellent long-term option for the treatment of all B7-1-positive diseases, including FSGS and perhaps diabetic kidney disease.”Harvard Medical School researchers at MGH have also identified a key molecule involved in kidney failure. To read more, visit the HMS website.last_img read more

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Bid on Original Taboo Costumes to Benefit Rosie’s Theater Kids

first_imgThey’re the perfect going out look, or maybe for Halloween 2016! Rosie’s Theater Kids, an arts education initiative from Rosie O’Donnell and Lori Klinger, is auctioning off some signature looks from the 2004 Broadway production of Taboo (which O’Donnell produced), designed by Mike Nicholls and Bobby Pearce. Additional items up for bid include tickets to Sylvia, where you can hang with Matthew Broderick or Annaleigh Ashford, the chance to meet Judith Light after Thérèse Raquin, and a date with Rosie herself at a little show called Hamilton.Rosie’s Theater Kids launched in 2003 and aims to spark an appreciation for the arts through classes, mentoring, academic guidance for students who might not otherwise have the opportunity to experience live theater.To browse through the auction lots and make a bid, visit RTKids’ CharityBuzz page. The 12th annual gala celebration will take place on November 2. View Commentslast_img read more

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