Professional fighting world helps raise money for UFC star’s missing stepdaughter’s reward

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailAuburn Police Department(MONTGOMERY, Ala.) — The professional fighting world is helping raise reward money for a UFC fighter’s stepdaughter who disappeared nearly 10 days ago.Aniah Haley Blanchard, a 19-year-old Alabama college student, was reported missing by her family on Oct. 24. She last communicated with a friend on Oct. 23, just before midnight, according to authorities.Police said evidence in the teen’s car, which was found abandoned near an apartment complex in Montgomery, Ala., on Oct. 25, indicates “she was harmed and is considered to be a victim of foul play,” police said in a statement Thursday.Blanchard is also the stepdaughter of mixed martial arts competitor Walt Harris.After UFC President Dana White pledged $25,000 toward the reward, UFC fighter Jon Jones wrote on Instagram Thursday: “add another 25,000 to that award.”An anonymous family from Homewood, Alabama, has offered a $25,000 reward, according to Montgomery Crime Stoppers. Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey contributed $5,000 and an anonymous individual contributed $5,000 via the Auburn Police, bringing the total reward money to $85,000 as of Friday, according to Montgomery Crime Stoppers.Dominance MMA founder Ali Abdelaziz said he’s also contributing $25,000 but that amount has not yet been added to the Crime Stoppers fund.“When you have children news like this is always heartbreaking, I can’t imagine what @thebigticket205 and his family are going through,” Abdelaziz tweeted Thursday. “If anybody gives info that leads to Aniah Blanchard, I will reward them w $25,000.” November 1, 2019 /Sports News – National Professional fighting world helps raise money for UFC star’s missing stepdaughter’s reward When you have children news like this is always heartbreaking I can’t imagine what @thebigticket205 and his family are going through. If anybody gives info that leads to Aniah Blanchard I will reward them w $25,000. Call 911 @IridiumSports pic.twitter.com/3IQjgmtEyd— Ali Abdelaziz (@AliAbdelaziz00) November 1, 2019Anyone with information is asked to call the Auburn Police at 334-501-3140, the anonymous tip line at 334-246-1391 or the 24-hour non-emergency number at 334-501-3100.Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved. Beau Lund Written bylast_img read more

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Mistrals to Get Newest Russian Strike, Defensive Weapon Systems

first_img View post tag: Mistrals View post tag: Navy Equipment & technology Newest Russian strike and defensive weapon systems including supersonic cruise missiles will be mounted on all four Mistral-class amphibious assault ships built for Russian Navy in France and Russia, reports today ITAR-TASS referring to a source in Russian defense industry.“As is planned, first two French-made ships and other two heli-carriers built in Russia will be armed with state-of-the-art Russian weapon systems including supersonic cruise missile launchers, and advanced missile/air/submarine defense systems”, specified the source.Of course, Mistrals will accommodate attack and ASW helicopters, artillery, amphibious landing craft, boats, armor vehicles and other weapon systems, he added.Russian arms will be mounted on French-built Mistrals by one of Russian defense companies when ships arrive from Saint-Nazaire, pointed out the source.Russian General Staff confirmed that information. “We don’t need unarmed landing ships like French Navy has. In fact, such Mistrals are huge ferries equipped with up-to-date combat control, navigation, reconnaissance and communication systems. They are a sort of vulnerable floating command posts need to be protected from the sea and the air by other ships and aviation“, said a spokesman for Russian General Staff.“Russian assault landing ships must be capable not only to control of task forces comprising surface ships, submarines, and naval aviation, or even inter-branch groupings worldwide; not only to lift and land marines on armored personnel carriers, helicopters, and amphibious boats, but must possess sufficient strike power to be full-fledged self-protected multi-functional warships within those task forces”, he emphasized.“With this in view, Russian Mistrals will be armed with long-range cruise missiles, newest air/missile defense systems, and antisubmarine weapons“, concluded the official.Russian Navy Commander-in-Chief ADM Vladimir Vysotsky told reporters on Feb 16, 2012 that Mistral-class assault landing ships built for Russia would be armed only with Russian weapons. “We’re going to mount missile systems for self-protection of our ships to improve their air defenses”, the admiral said. “Also, we will reinforce helicopter component with antisubmarine capabilities”, he added. Vysotsky stressed that such ships were important as “an element of a task force, they can considerably strengthen its combat worthiness”. By the way, the commander said Mistral-class ships built for French Navy were not equipped with such arms.Commenting of the EUR 1.2-bln delivery contract for two Mistral-class assault landing ships signed on June 17, 2011 in the presence of Russian president Dmitry Medvedev, the Navy Commander said that “a well-equipped command post on board those ships makes possible to control forces at any distance from bases all across the globe”. “Construction technology applied allows integration of Russian weapon systems including amphibious craft and deck-based aviation”, emphasized Vysotsky. “Such vessel can be used as command ship coordinating operations of a task force deployed at any regions worldwide for peacekeeping and humanitarian purposes. By the way, Mistral’s capabilities of this kind considerably outclass current Russian Navy’s ships”, Vysotsky said.“Those features of Mistral ships make them essential for Russian Navy throughout the whole range of tasks in war and peacetime”, said the Navy Commander. At present, France builds the first ship for Russia laid down on Feb 1 in Saint-Nazaire. She is expected to joint Russian Navy in 2014, the second one – in 2015.In particular, those ships will accommodate Russian attack helicopters Ka-52 Alligator which adaptation for shipborne service had finished in Sept 2011 at Northern Fleet.According to the contract, France will transfer a number of “sensitive technologies” to Russia, including tactical data system SENIT-9 standard for Mistral-class ships. Later on, those technologies will be used in other two ships to be constructed by Russian shipyards.One Mistral-class assault landing ship displaces 21,000 tons, has overall length of 210 meters, is capable to accommodate up to 16 heavy helicopters, and deliver up to 900 servicemen and 70 combat vehicles to assigned region.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , February 28, 2012; Share this article View post tag: Naval View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Defensive View post tag: Russian View post tag: Weapon View post tag: newest February 28, 2012 View post tag: Strike Back to overview,Home naval-today Mistrals to Get Newest Russian Strike, Defensive Weapon Systems View post tag: Systems Mistrals to Get Newest Russian Strike, Defensive Weapon Systems View post tag: getlast_img read more

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USA Track & Field Counsel Discusses Olympic Trademarks, Doping Rules With Law Students

first_imgUSA Track & Field Counsel Discusses Olympic Trademarks, Doping Rules With Law StudentsOlivia Covington for www.theindianalawyer.comThe most important legal consideration of the Olympic Games is the protection of intellectual property – specifically, the protection of the trademarked five Olympic rings.Securing the rights of the use of the infamous logo is essential to ensuring the games bring in the necessary revenue, Norman Wain, general counsel for USA Track & Field, told a group of Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law students on Thursday. Wain spoke about the legal considerations surrounding the Olympics during a lecture Thursday evening at the Indianapolis law school.The rings are the games’ greatest asset, Wain said, so they are protected vigorously to ensure that companies and individuals who pay for the rights to use the rings in their advertising as Olympic sponsors can effectively monetize their investments. Those investments are so important that when a London sausage shop put out a display with its sausages arranged in the pattern of the rings during the 2012 Olympic Games, the shop received a cease-and-desist order against the display because it did not have the rights to use the trademark.Even sports organizations that send athletes to the Olympics must gain permission before using any sort of branding that might be owned by the International Olympic Committee or the United States Olympic Committee, Wain said.He pointed to the annual USA Track & Field Outdoor Championships as an example of the Olympic committee’s close protection of their trademarks. The outdoor championships occur each year, but every fourth year the championships are branded as the “Olympic trials” as the country’s top track and field athletes compete for a sport on the United States Olympic team.With the “Olympic trials” branding, the USOC allows the track and field organization temporary use of the five rings trademark, as well as the promotion of Team USA, a phrase that is also trademarked by the Olympic committee. Once the trials are over, USATF loses its rights to the marks and must wait four more years before it can advertise with the rings or “Team USA” again.Television rights are also tied to the rights to use trademarked Olympic branding, Wain said. The USOC’s television partnership is with the NBC network, which means NBC has the rights to broadcast the games. USATF’s partnership is also with NBC, which means the network also broadcasts the annual outdoor championships.However, if USATF had a partnership with ESPN, then the sports network would have the rights to broadcast the annual championships for three years in a row. But on the fourth year, when USATF brands its annual competition as the Olympic trials, the trials would have to be broadcast on NBC because only NBC has the right to broadcast the USOC’s trademarks through its partnership with the committee, Wain said.The protection of the Olympic committee’s trademarks is particularly important in the United States because, unlike other national committees, the USOC is not publicly funded by the government. Thus, the rights to the trademarks and other Olympic branding are the key revenue stream for the games in the U.S., Wain said.Aside from trademarks and intellectual property, Wain also broached the legalities of anti-doping laws, which became particularly important during the 2106 Rio Games after dozens of Russia athletes tested positive for banned substances.Unlike the USOC, the Russian Olympic committee is publicly funded, as is its anti-doping agency. The Russian government often funnels more of its money toward the Olympic committee and much less toward its anti-doping efforts, Wain said, which results in a lower anti-doping standard in the country.In fact, Wain said there is evidence that athletic leaders in Russia would intentionally put track and field competitors on doping regimens before a competition, wean them off the substances leading up to an event so that they would test clean at the competition, then put them back on the doping regimens when they returned home for training.As a result, the International Association of Athletics Federations banned Russian athletes, but with a caveat – any athlete living and training in another country and subject to that country’s anti-doping laws could still compete. That meant a Russian track and field athlete who had been training in Florida was allowed to compete as a Russian athlete, even though the Russian track and field team did not compete.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Spice rack: Cumin

first_imgCumin is a spice that is used in many countries around the world, but in particular in India, The Middle East, North Africa and Mexico. It is also added to some European cheeses.It is used either as a seed or ground and is said to be the second most popular spice after black pepper, as it is often added to curries and can be used as one of the spices in the filling for samosas. Cumin also goes very well with vegetables, and a vegetarian strudel can be made by cooking together butternut squash, onions, lentils, ground cumin (or cumin seeds) and thyme before wrapping them in filo pastry and baking. Make chilli beef pies and flavour the filling with both chilli and ground cumin before topping with puff or shortcrust pastry.Why not make Curried Corn Bread, by adding ground cumin to gently softened onions, along with turmeric and a little chilli, then mixing with the flour, corn meal (or polenta), bicarbonate of soda and buttermilk. White bread can also be given a different flavour by adding ground cumin to the flour or you could make Cumin Onion Bread by adding it to sweated sliced onions and adding to the bread mixture.Fiona Burrell, co-author of Leiths Baking Bible, from the Leiths School of Foodand Winelast_img read more

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Mrs Crimble’s launches giveaway initiative

first_imgMrs Crimble’s has launched a giveaway campaign inviting consumers to nominate individuals to receive free gluten-free bakery goods.The firm will be sending out 1,000 packs of its free-from bakery products as part of its ‘Share the Love’ campaign, enabling customers to nominate friends and family through a dedicated website, www.letsbakelove.com. The campaign will run until the end of 2012.Jeremy Woods, managing director of Mrs Crimble’s, said: “We are sending out 1,000 packs of goodies every month, including lots of Britain’s favourite macaroons, Bakewell slices and our Double Choc Brownies. We commissioned a survey on the subject of kindness* to help us raise awareness of the giveaway and draw attention to what an important quality kindness is.“We are a small and close-knit team and we came up with the whole ‘Share the Love’ campaign because we think that kindness really matters. There can never be too much of it in the world, and, sometimes, a chat over a nice cup of tea is all it takes. So hopefully the goodies we send out will help.”last_img read more

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51 Years Later, Bob Dylan Triumphantly Returns To Forest Hills Stadium

first_imgOn August 28th, 1965, Bob Dylan made one of the most infamous appearances of his career at the Forest Hills Stadium in Queens, NY. Many fans will point to Dylan “going electric” at the Newport Folk Festival as the turning point in his career, and in rock music at large, but the legend doesn’t stop with Newport. Dylan’s performance at Forest Hills in 1965 was hotly contested, with fans rushing the stage and throwing fruit immediately after Dylan took out an electric guitar.Of course, we now look back at that with bewilderment. Dylan was able to win over the crowd with his then-new songs, “Ballad Of A Thin Man” and “Like A Rolling Stone.” He won over everyone else too, and soon electric guitars became something of a mainstay for live performances. When Mumford & Sons tried to capitalize on the whole “going electric” phenomenon last year, music fans just rolled their eyes. Been there, done that.It took Mr. Dylan a good 51 years before he would make his return to Forest Hills, settling in last night at the beloved venue. Dylan’s set lists have become more predictable now, mainly focusing on his two latest releases, Shadows In The Night (2015) and Fallen Angels (2016). In that way, the 1965 and 2016 shows are similar; they both feature Dylan playing new and unfamiliar tunes, yet powerfully captivating an audience all the while. Dylan will always remain the voice of his generation.Still, Dylan makes time for one of his most classic songs in his shows. Watch “Blowin’ In The Wind” below, courtesy of Ny Kingyo.It’s good to have you back, Mr. Dylan. You can see the full setlist from Forest Hills, below.Edit this setlist | More Bob Dylan setlists[Cover photo via cb.photo.shoot/Instagram]last_img read more

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Notre Dame wins Shamrock Series game

first_imgNotre Dame students and fans traveled to Indianapolis Saturday for the 2014 Shamrock Series game versus Purdue.The game, which was held at Lucas Oil Stadium, ended well for the Irish, who beat the Boilermakers of Purdue, 30-14.Michael Yu | The Observer Junior Colleen Pinkelman said the atmosphere in Lucas Oil Stadium was electric.“The stadium is a big pro stadium, which makes the atmosphere different from Notre Dame Stadium,” she said. “It was a really cool venue for the Shamrock Series.”Junior Julia Zanotelli said the proximity to South Bend made the game more accessible to students.“We drove, and it only took about 2 and a half hours,” Zanotelli said. “The game being so close contributed to a lot of students being able to attend, which made for a great student section.”Junior Andrew Cusator said the tailgating was was a highlight of the day.“The pregame atmosphere was second only to the main lot outside Notre Dame Stadium,” he said. “It was a great time with family and friends.”Pinkelman said the night game added to the excitement.“Night games have a whole different atmosphere than day games, and this game was no exception,” she said. “Just like the Michigan game, the night adds an extra amount of hype. It made the stadium more charged with energy.”Junior gold squad Notre Dame cheerleader Lizz Weir, said the trip to Indianapolis was fulfilling for the whole team.“Notre Dame did a great job planning the Shamrock series this year,” she said. “The weekend was so much fun and Indy was a really great atmosphere.“There was so much to do and the energy from all the fans before the game was something I cannot imagine happening at any other school. From fan festivals to parades to pep rallies, the cheerleaders were all over the place this weekend, but we enjoyed every second of it.”Zanotelli said there were definitely more Irish fans in the stands, but there was a good presence from Purdue as well.“I think it really helped being that both schools are in Indiana that there was a large showing from both teams at the game,” she said.Sophomore Noelle Gooding said the game itself was entertaining to watch.“Beating Purdue and moving up to 3-0 for the season made for a good time on Saturday,” she said.Tags: football, Indianapolis, Lucas Oil Stadium, Purdue, Shamrock Serieslast_img read more

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ND introduces diversity, inclusion director

first_imgOlivia Mikkelsen Faculty members welcomed Pamela Nolan Young, who was appointed earlier this month to the newly created role of Director of Academic Diversity and Inclusion, at a forum Thursday night in McKenna Hall. Young, Provost Tom Burish and several assistant provosts spoke about diversity and answered questions from faculty members. Burish said the forum was about “big things,” such as the faculty climate on campus for inclusion and diversity. “The recent focus on this topic started with the faculty experience survey, which was a recommendation of women faculty that came to see me a couple of years ago,” he said. “They suggested we do a survey so that all faculty could speak about their experiences at Notre Dame. It was a constructive, positive conversation. They were there to find solutions.” Young will be in charge of coordinating the University’s diversity and inclusion efforts, specifically regarding the faculty climate. “I’ve had three passions in my life: They are education, social justice and my faith,” she said. “As a law student in the late 1980s, I never imagined that those passions would evolve into a career path known as a diversity and inclusion practitioner.“I’m here to be a resource for deans, for department chairs, for faculty, for students and for staff.”A graduate of the Notre Dame Law School, Young said she was thrilled to be back at Notre Dame.“I began my professional career here and it is my hope that I will end it here as well. In the almost 30 years in between, I’ve practiced law, I’ve taught legal research and writing, I’ve served as a college administrator, I’ve earned a degree in educational leadership and established a consulting business.” With over 25 years of experience, Young will focus on addressing issues and weaknesses identified from the survey. Burish said that many recommendations resulting from the survey had already been made to his office. “The deans reported that in every school and college they met with some groups of faculty to talk about the survey results and to identify some ways of addressing the weakness and actions we could take at each level — department, college, university, etc. — and forwarded their recommendations to us,” he said. “I could not ask for more.”Young said her passion for social justice started when she was a child growing up in rural Alabama; She said the year she entered first grade was the first year the school was desegregated. “What we often think of now as social justice, I knew as a child as civil rights,” she said. “Often, we think of civil rights as a movement of the past. As champions of that movement pass, like our own Fr. Ted, it seems remote, distant and irrelevant. But for me and millions more, it is the story of our lives.”Tags: Diversity, inclusion, pamela nolan young, Provost Officelast_img read more

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Quake Destroyed 50 Percent Of Haiti GDP

first_img The quake that ravaged Haiti over six weeks ago destroyed up to 50 percent of the Caribbean nation’s gross domestic product, President Rene Preval said Thursday. “This earthquake … led to the deaths of 200,000 to 300,000 people and destroyed from 35 to 50 percent of the GDP,” Preval said. “What is important now is to strengthen the Haitian government,” said Lula, adding to the Haitian people: “at this moment of pain, at this moment of desperation, we must lift our heads up.” He was speaking as he met with Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva at a UN-Brazilian military base in the Haitian capital Port-au-Prince, which was ravaged by the January 12 7.0-magnitude quake. center_img By Dialogo February 26, 2010 He also called on the international community to cancel Haiti’s debt.last_img read more

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Is H5N1 still a threat? What to do when your pandemic preparedness work is challenged

first_img(CIDRAP Source Osterholm Briefing) – How are you explaining the current risk of an H5N1-related influenza pandemic to your boss, the emergency preparedness committee, or the executive suite today? Is the task daunting? Are you being waved off with the comment that all this attention to pandemic preparedness is just public health’s version of Y2K?If so, you are not alone. After all, while sporadic human cases and bird-related outbreaks continue, the last worrisome cluster of human cases emerged more than a year ago. And the much-anticipated trigger that would launch many pandemic plans—sustained human-to-human transmission of the deadly H5N1 strain of influenza—has yet to occur. Maybe you are even questioning whether this current level of bird and human virus activity is the “new normal.” Perhaps you’re wondering if you can relax your preparedness efforts a bit.The answer is absolutely not. The risk of H5N1 causing a pandemic remains very real. Yet no one with a credible understanding of influenza virology can put odds on that risk. Given that quandary, what are responsible planners supposed to say and do? Let me see if I can offer help.Companies built to last take the long viewWe routinely plan for disasters that we can anticipate but for which we are unable to predict the exact time or place. Ten pandemics have been documented in the last 300 years, and we know more will happen in the future. So why has the much-watched H5N1 virus suddenly fallen off the radar screen?Ten years ago in May, H5N1 claimed its first human victim in Hong Kong. Public health authorities documented what they considered an apparent isolated case of human H5N1 infection. Later that year, an outbreak of H5N1 in domestic waterfowl sold in Hong Kong markets resulted in another human outbreak. By November 1997, 18 human cases of H5N1 infection, with six deaths, were documented. Sustained person-to-person transmission did not occur, and the outbreak stopped when all birds in the Hong Kong commercial poultry industry (about 1.4 million) were slaughtered.With a backdrop of international news coverage, some public health and animal health officials claimed that the prompt and unprecedented avian control efforts likely averted the next influenza pandemic. This event and such statements likely “set up” an expectation that H5N1 could cause the next pandemic. The public felt that if we didn’t control the threat at that moment, a pandemic would begin. Then everyone felt relief, which led to the sense that we could quash the threat.But H5N1 resurged in Asia in the fall of 2003 and spread in domestic poultry farms at an historically unprecedented rate. Human cases with bird contact followed. Obviously, the success claimed in eradicating the virus as a future pandemic risk was premature. The 2003 outbreak tapered off in spring 2004, but in summer it reemerged in several Asian countries (including Cambodia, China, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam), where the virus continues to infect and kill people.But because sustained human-to-human transmission has yet to happen, we see much of the public and many preparedness officials confused about the risk. Unfortunately, many seem to believe that, like a severe weather warning that ends without incident, the risk of H5N1 causing another pandemic will pass with time. Companies built to last won’t be fooled by such short-sightedness.Why you should keep watching H5N1The H5N1 strains currently causing outbreaks across Asia and elsewhere are genetically distinct from the strain isolated from humans in Hong Kong in 1997. The virus continues to produce a virtual kaleidoscope of new strains. And that’s dangerous.Leading influenza experts who gathered in Toronto last week at the International Conference on Options for the Control of Influenza offered some sobering observations:Southeast Asia, the area from which the virus began spreading in late 2003, has seen multiple H5N1 bird outbreaks just in the past month, along with Vietnam’s first human death in 2 years, noted Dr. Watanee Kalpravidh of the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization. “Freedom from infection has not been sustained in the region,” she said. “There has been a recurrence of cases in most of the affected countries, with some countries having continuing outbreaks. The virus may be endemic in some countries.”Dr. Ian Brown of the British government’s Veterinary Laboratory Agency noted that in Europe and the Russian Federation, “the reemergence of the virus in a number of countries does suggest we are moving toward endemicity,” even though some countries have deployed vaccinations against the disease.The apparent endemic threat means that every day this virus is replicating, and with each reproduction of itself, such viral activity leads to another chance for a critical pandemic-related genetic mutation.Remember H3N8I would also remind every pandemic preparedness planner never to forget our experience with the H3N8 influenza virus. What the heck is H3N8, you may ask?This strain of avian influenza virus emerged as an important cause of illness in horses in the early 1960s. No one understands from either a genetic or transmission standpoint why it jumped from birds to horses. Then, after more than 40 years of ongoing transmission in horses, this virus was suddenly able to infect dogs. Initially the infection only occurred in racing greyhounds, a breed of dogs that has close contact with race horses.Since 2004 when the first isolated cases of greyhound infections were documented, H3N8 has become widespread in pet dogs throughout the United States. No one can provide a clear explanation why this new disease problem has occurred except to say some unexplained changes along the bird-to-horse, horse-to-dog transmission road took place.Such a phenomenon very well could be a model of bird-to-human transmission of H5N1. A critical genetic change that results in a human pandemic strain might occur today, tomorrow, or even 10 years from now. Maybe it will never occur. But we can never rule out that one day an unexpected genetic change will take place in the widely circulating H5N1 virus that will suddenly change the potential for H5N1 to be transmitted by and between humans.The bottom line for businessAnother influenza pandemic will occur one day in the future—we just don’t know when. As one of my colleagues has said: “The pandemic clock is ticking; we just don’t know what time it is.” So, no, of course we don’t have a public health Y2K. How could we? We don’t have a clue when the next pandemic’s “Jan 1, 2000” will be. And I sure wouldn’t want to bet my family’s life on H5N1 not becoming the next pandemic strain—the unknowns are too many, while the knowns are abundant enough to raise alarms. When you find yourself challenged by myopic colleagues about the waning risk of an H5N1 pandemic, cite the H3N8 example.I don’t know if H5N1 will cause the next pandemic. It might. It might not. What I do know is that some strain of influenza will cause a pandemic. If you expect the unexpected—just as you would with any disaster—you and your company will be far better off.—Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH, Director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research & Policy (CIDRAP), Editor-in-Chief of the CIDRAP Business Source, Professor in the School of Public Health, and Adjunct Professor in the Medical School, University of Minnesota.last_img read more

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