Bomb scare on Royal Navy nuclear submarine yard a hoax

first_img View post tag: BAe Systems Photo: Royal Navy photo The BAE Systems’ Barrow-in-Furness shipyard was evacuated on April 10 after a bomb was reported to have been found on one of the Royal Navy nuclear submarines under construction at the yard.An estimated 1,700 staff are believed to have been evacuated in the process.“Following an extensive sweep of the Devonshire Dock Complex (DDC), including the four Astute class submarines in build, nothing suspicious was found,” BAE Systems said in a statement.“We expect to be able to close the incident shortly.”BAE Systems is responsible for the construction of Royal Navy’s nuclear-powered Astute-class attack submarines. In October 2016, the company also started work on the UK’s next generation of nuclear deterrent submarines. The new Dreadnought-class ballistic missile submarines are scheduled to gradually replace the four Vanguard-class boats from the early 2030s. View post tag: Barrow-in-Furness Share this articlelast_img read more

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University of Evansville Names New Chief Diversity Officer

first_imgThe University of Evansville has named Robert Shelby, PhD, as its new Chief Diversity Officer. Beginning August 1, Shelby will lead and coordinate the University’s efforts in all aspects of diversity, equity, and inclusion.As the Chief Diversity Officer, Shelby will report directly to the president of the University, will serve as part of the president’s leadership team, and will lead the newly created Center for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. Shelby will work closely with the Office of Student Affairs and the Office of Human Resources with responsibilities in multicultural affairs, institutional equity/Title IX, and university religious life.“This new organizational structure strengthens our ability to coordinate and enhance efforts of diversity, equity, and inclusion across campus,” said UE president Christopher M. Pietruszkiewicz.Shelby earned his Ph.D. from the University of Louisville in 2016 in applied sociology. He earned graduate degrees in sociology from Western Illinois University and communications from Trinity International University, and an undergraduate degree in youth ministry and biblical studies from Trinity International University. In addition to his higher education experience, Shelby worked as an engineering technician and served in the U.S. Army.Additionally, Shelby has been teaching sociology courses at the University of Evansville since 2015 as an assistant professor.“Dr. Shelby is already part of the UE family,” said Pietruszkiewicz. “He knows our culture and is well-respected among the student body. I cannot think of a better person to lead our diversity initiatives.”During his time at UE, Shelby has served as a student and faculty mentor, as a member of the taskforce on race, and as a Title IX investigator.“I’m most excited to work with students, faculty, staff, administrators, and alumni in this more actionable capacity,” said Shelby. “Being entrusted to educate our students in the classroom has been my honor and privilege. Now, I hope to extend my concern for diversity, equity, and inclusion to our entire learning community.”Among his many duties, Shelby will manage the Diversity Resource Center, develop the annual Martin Luther King Jr. celebration, coordinate the Let’s Talk Diversity at UE events, serve as a mentor and advisor for multicultural and diversity-related student organizations, and work closely with internal and external constituencies to advance overall diversity, equity, and inclusion on campus.“I am deeply humbled by the show of support from the UE community as I become the next Chief Diversity Officer,” Shelby said. “I firmly believe that if we can agree that every human being has inherent value, we owe it to one another to think deeply, plan effectively, and act empathetically about matters of diversity, equity, and inclusion at UE.”Shelby has been married to Tricia for 26 years, and they have three adult daughters and one grandson.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Chasing the last of fall

first_imgTrying to hide in the branches. (Karen Dalot)Resting on a fence post. (Karen Dalot)I had my fill, time to fly away. (Karen Dalot) A chickadee. (Karen Dalot)Just hanging around. (Karen Dalot) A woodpecker. (Karen Dalot)Checking out the views. (Karen Dalot)Nothing shows the fall colors better… a gray fox, Wilton (Jim Knox)With the leaves now gone and temps on the way down, early morning mist moves in and snow will not be far behind. Wilton. (Jim Knox)A Great Blue Heron, Hills Pond. (Jim Knox)Mosher Hill Waterfall at high water. (Paige Plourde)Mosher Hill Waterfall at high water. (Paige Plourde)Friday’s crusty snow cover created interesting patterns on blades of grass. (Don Waterhouse)Light crusty snow capped red berries Friday morning. (Don Waterhouse)last_img read more

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Watch This Vulfpeck “Dean Town” Fan Cover Video Featuring Glass Harp, Tuba, Bassoon, And Bass

first_img[Photo: Brandon Weil] Outside of the band itself, one of the greatest things about the Brooklyn-based funk act Vulfpeck is their ability to inspire and compel fans and music freaks to create their own renditions of their technically complex numbers. However, while we love seeing fans cover their songs tunes using the more traditional instrumentation of guitar, bass, keys, and drums, sometimes the best things in life fall outside that box. Earlier today, Vulfpeck acknowledged this, posting a fan video compilation that showcases four ladies locking down the Joe Dart’s bassline from “Dean Town.”Some High School Student Started A Band Just To Mash Up Vulfpeck & PhishWith a caption noting “pre-web this instrumentation would’ve only happened in a modern art museum,” the video overlays videos of renditions of “Dean Town” on the bass, bassoon, tuba, and glass harp, making for a stellar watch. You can check out the video for yourself below. Enjoy!last_img read more

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Disaster! Opens Officially on Broadway

first_img No reason to cry out loud, because the disco-laden Disaster! opens at the Nederlander Theatre on March 8. To celebrate the Jack Plotnick-helmed production’s big night, Broadway.com resident artist Justin “Squigs” Robertson penned this sketch of the cast in action.The gang’s all there: look out for Adam Pascal as Chad, Seth Rudetsky as Professor Ted Scheider, Kerry Butler as Marianne, Rachel York as Jackie, Lacretta Nicole as Levora, Jennifer Simard as Sister Mary, Faith Prince as Shirley, Kevin Chamberlin as Maury, Roger Bart as Tony, Max Crumm as Scott and Baylee Littrell as both Ben and Lisa.Broadway.com wishes a happy opening to the cast of Disaster! Have a safe night and remember: although oxygen is flowing, the bag may not inflate, etc. Disaster! Show Closed This production ended its run on May 8, 2016 View Comments About the Artist: With a desire to celebrate the magic of live theater and those who create it, and with a deep reverence for such touchstones as the work of Al Hirschfeld and the wall at Sardi’s, Squigs is happy and grateful to be among those carrying on the traditions where theater and caricature meet. He was born and raised in Oregon, lived in Los Angeles for quite a long time and now calls New York City his home. Related Shows © Justin “Squigs” Robertsonlast_img read more

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Questions raised about Vietnam’s avian flu reports and testing

first_imgMar 4, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Vietnam, the country at the center of this year’s avian influenza activity, may have two problems with its data on human cases: transparency in reporting and accuracy in testing.The country has lapsed in its reporting of cases to the World Health Organization (WHO). More than a month passed without official reporting of cases, despite widespread media reports of several new cases, according to a story by the Canadian Press (CP) on Mar 1.Ongoing monitoring by CIDRAP News also shows substantial discrepancies between official and unofficial numbers (see Case Count tables).Because the WHO relies on official reports for its case counts and as the basis for advice to member countries, the lack of reporting has an impact, Dr. Klaus Stohr, director of the WHO’s global influenza program, told the CP.”The situation is that WHO has a request by its member states to provide proper risk assessment, to help other member states of WHO . . . in assessing what’s going on in Asia and provide advice to other member states. And without this information, this is very difficult,” Stohr said.WHO officials had requested reports in person and in writing, the CP story noted. Those efforts appeared to be paying off on Mar 2, when Dick Thompson, communications officer in the Communicable Diseases Section of WHO in Geneva, told CIDRAP News by e-mail, “We understand that there is some movement and we will have an update shortly.”Vietnam is not the only country with reporting shortcomings. Indonesian farmers tallied more than 33,000 poultry deaths from avian flu during the past 2 months, the Jakarta Post reported today. Indonesia has not reported any new outbreaks to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) in several months.Reporting can trigger difficult consequences. “Many countries find it difficult to report outbreaks of contagious diseases. These can impact trade and tourism, or it can injure their international standing or self-image,” Thompson wrote.The pattern of cases in Vietnam has not changed recently. Thompson commented, “The press reports suggest that the missing cases are sporadic. This would be a serious public health issue if there were a cluster of cases—that is not 15 isolated cases ranging over several weeks, but a single cluster of 15 cases, from one area, among casual contacts and health care workers. That doesn’t seem to be the case in Viet Nam.”He criticized developed nations: “These are nations which can afford to help countries like Viet Nam. Right now, these Asian countries are sustaining enormous hits to their economies in the effort to fight [avian] flu. If they are successful, every nation will benefit by not having to confront a pandemic. Therefore, we believe that those nations which share the benefits of this fight should . . . help [poorer] countries which are largely managing on their own.”Reporting issues aside, Vietnam may face another hurdle in coping with avian flu: re-analysis of samples showed that some Vietnamese who had flulike symptoms but tested negative for H5N1 in Vietnam actually had the virus. The findings, which cast doubt on the sensitivity of Vietnam’s H5N1 test, were described in a Feb 24 news story in Nature.According to the story, samples from 11 recent avian flu case-patients in Vietnam, as well as samples from 90 patients who had suspected cases but tested negative for H5N1, were sent to the National Institute of Infectious Diseases in Tokyo. About a third of the samples had been tested there so far. Of those, seven that had tested negative in Vietnam were found to be positive, said Phan Van Tu, head of the microbiology and immunology department at the Pasteur Institute in Ho Chi Minh City.Retesting in Vietnam then confirmed four of the seven positive results.Tu said one reason for the discrepancy was that reagents in the original tests weren’t mixed well and yielded unclear results. He added that the institute would use the more sensitive test that was used in Tokyo and improve technician training, according to the story.last_img read more

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SRI: Gov’ts Should Push for Fair Treatment of Seafarers

first_imgInternational backing has been given to a new initiative from London-based Seafarers Rights’ International (SRI), which aims to harness the support of governments worldwide in implementing locally-binding legislation on the fair treatment of seafarers following a maritime casualty.Representatives from more than 50 countries attended a workshop on the subject organized by SRI in conjunction with the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) and addressed by key speakers including Kitack Lim, Secretary General of the IMO.Attendees discussed the key issue of guidelines on fair treatment of seafarers in the event of a maritime accident and explore ways these guidelines could be implemented into national legislation.Deirdre Fitzpatrick, Executive Director of Seafarers’ Rights International, who opened the workshop, said the level of international support at the event across many stakeholder groups was important because it “mixed the practical effects of the guidelines with the legal aspects associated with their implementation.”“We had a panel of three judges from the International Court of Justice, the Tribunal of the Law of the Sea and from the Supreme Court of the Philippines. We also had an emeritus professor of maritime law, a prosecutor, a Lead Auditor from the IMO as well as a casualty investigator from the UK’s Marine Accident Investigation Branch who discussed no-blame casualty investigations,” Fitzpatrick added.Fitzpatrick further said that it is not often that the international law community is given the opportunity to discuss a crucial issue concerning seafarers’ rights in “such an informal but thought-provoking way.”Whilst some governments have already given effect to the guidelines, it is important that other governments consider them and look at ways they can be introduced into their national legislation, Fitzpatrick stressed.“We want to raise awareness of the Fair Treatment of Seafarers at international, regional and local levels, and advise on how best countries can implement the guidelines and have the right laws in place in the event of a maritime casualty investigation occurring in their jurisdiction. The next step will be to run regional workshops outside the UK, and we have already had offers from participants to host similar workshops in their own countries,” according to Fitzpatrick.last_img read more

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Parents take school board to court over transgender policy (Canada)

first_imgVancouver Sun 12 November 2014Three Vancouver parents are taking the Vancouver School Board to court in a bid to quash a controversial policy that provided more support for transgender students. Xiaofeng Huang, Yuen Ching Li and Shaohui Liu have filed a petition in B.C. Supreme Court claiming the school board policy, adopted June 16 in front of a deeply divided audience, violates the School Act and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.It said the policy, which allows transgender students to use washrooms and locker-rooms that correspond to their gender identities, violates students’ rights to privacy and encroaches on parental rights over their children.“Some students are uncomfortable with sharing very personal information or private spaces with members of the opposite sex and deeply care about their privacy when using the washroom or change room,” said the petition, filed Oct. 31.“The board never proposed how to accommodate the wishes of students who are uncomfortable with sharing the same washroom and change room with members of the opposite sex.”The policy also allows transgender students to be addressed by the name that corresponds with their gender identity.http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Parents+take+school+board+court+over+transgender+policy/10376113/story.htmllast_img read more

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End of Life Choice Bill – 1st Reading – Chris Penk (National)

first_imgThank you, Mr Speaker. I rise to speak against this bill. At the heart of this bill is the question of choice, and yet we must all acknowledge that assisted suicide, or euthanasia, by whatever name we call it, is a choice to end all choices. It is, by definition, irreversible, the end; that it shares with any other form of suicide. As such, we should proceed exceedingly carefully before even considering whether safeguards, so-called, may mitigate some of the worst aspects of it.It is this nature of choice that is being promoted by those who have brought this bill to the House that we must attack. We must understand clearly the concepts of undue influence and coercion that undermine choice and that play on the minds of those who are vulnerable, and those who are vulnerable are the very ones who would be wanting to access this in that moment of time in their vulnerability.In their depression, people are vulnerable. To be depressed is literally to be pushed down. When one is pushed down, one is not capable of making good decisions. One is not capable of understanding fully the consequences of one’s actions, and yet this bill would allow people the ability to make, in that vulnerable state, in that vulnerable condition, a choice that would end all other choices.So many of our fellow New Zealanders, young and old, have already made that choice; they have no further choices left. It is a subject that this House rightly concerns itself with and should continue to do so. We must do more to discourage suicide and other forms of ending life prematurely, and not encourage more of it.Much has been said on the subject of dignity, too. Those in favour of the bill, at least to the first reading stage, have described a situation of a life that they say lacks dignity at that point. Disabled constituents of mine have said to me, “Do not let anyone tell you that certain conditions equate to a lack of dignity. They are describing my life.” They say to me, “This is my life. I am happy with it. I have dignity, and for anyone in the Parliament to suggest otherwise is, quite simply, intolerable.”We’ve heard about so-called safeguards; for example, the suggestion that one might be able to exercise this choice if one has a terminal illness. One might have a diagnosis of a terminal illness but not, in fact, have a terminal illness. One may have a mistaken diagnosis or, indeed, a mistaken prognosis, and one might make a decision based on that. And if that factual basis is proven to be incorrect, what recourse then does that person have? The answer is none, because the person will have died. Our criminal justice system admits the possibility of mistake as to facts and as to law. Among other reasons, this is why we do not have a law of capital punishment; mistakes are made. If anyone in this House doubts that, they should ask Mr Teina Pora if that is so. If we allow people to be pressured into making a choice or to make the choice seemingly of their own volition but based on a mistaken assumption as to facts, and if the facts, so-called, prove to be incorrect later, there is no recourse, there is not opportunity to turn back the clock. They are, at that point, dead.The intersection of our terrible rate of suicide in this country and our terrible record of elder abuse and neglect is this bill. There is much work we have to do in this Parliament on these subjects and, indeed, mental health in general. Will this bill encourage or undermine efforts to promote the real dignity, the real protection of life, the genuine role of the medical profession? I say, no; I say we reject it. And if you are in favour of euthanasia as a principle, I say to members of this House: this bill is not the one for you; it is far too broad. We should reject it.last_img read more

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New Zealand’s largest-ever crime survey finds under-reporting, likely victims of crime

first_imgStuff co.nz 20 May 2020Family First Comment: The report found there was a clear link between victimisation and socio-economic conditions as people under financial pressure, living in more deprived areas, unemployed or not looking for employment and those in single parent households were likely to be targets of crime. “Victims are most likely to be aged between 19 to 29, Māori, never married, have moderate-to-high levels of psychological distress, lower life satisfaction ratings and lower feelings of safety.”New Zealand’s largest crime survey has painted a picture of likely victims of crime.Over the last year, 1,713,000 offences occurred — of those, 1,139,000 were personal offences and 574,000 were household offences, the Ministry of Justice survey said.While the level of crime was similar to last year’s report, sector deputy secretary Tim Hampton said there was nothing for New Zealand to be proud of.But the survey results were helping officials identify who were New Zealand’s likely victims of crime.The report found there was a clear link between victimisation and socio-economic conditions as people under financial pressure, living in more deprived areas, unemployed or not looking for employment and those in single parent households were likely to be targets of crime.“Victims are most likely to be aged between 19 to 29, Māori, never married, have moderate-to-high levels of psychological distress, lower life satisfaction ratings and lower feelings of safety.”READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/crime/121556520/new-zealands-largestever-crime-survey-finds-underreporting-likely-victims-of-crimeKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

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