OIT warns of anti-virus scam

first_imgComputer users beware — the Office of Information Technologies (OIT) has launched a campaign to warn students against fake anti-virus scams that are causing problems on computers across campus.“Fake anti-virus attacks are when a pop-up from an unknown anti-virus program occurs and tells the user that it has discovered malware and needs to clear your computer of a potential virus,” David Seidl, Information Security Program manager, said.But the trick is that the anti-virus is actually a virus itself that aims at getting credit card information from unsuspecting users, he said.“What happens is that the user clicks on the pop-up and allows the virus to install itself on their computer,” Seidl said. “Once the virus is installed, it says it found malware on your computer and that you must pay a certain amount of money to get rid of it. Then, it takes your credit card information.“These programs prey on a user’s fear they’re infected.”Seidl said OIT launched to program to benefit students and faculty.“The first thing is to be aware,” Seidl said. “The pop-up will look like it’s from your anti-virus software, but it’s not. It will often have a name like, ‘Anti-virus 2010′ or something generic.”Once someone identifies the pop-up as a virus, there is a simple step they can take to work against it, he said.“The first thing a user should do once they have identified the potential attack is to hit ‘control+alt+delete’ and then kill their browser,” he said. “The entire box is a clickable window, so if the user hits anywhere in the pop-up, the program will open and begin installing.”Seidl said students can also decrease their chances of being attacked by having a safe anti-virus program, making sure their current browser and operating systems are up-to-date and practicing safe browsing habits.“OIT provides a free anti-virus program, available on the Web site,” Seidl said. “We have done technical protections, but the best protection is to get users not to click on the fake anti-virus pop-ups.”Seidl said OIT launched the campaign in response to an increase in Help Desk calls regarding viruses.“It has definitely been showing up more, and Help Desk calls have gone up recently,” Seidl said. “Every year for the past three years, new versions of this have come out. As we see new versions and increased infections, we want to be sure people deal with it.”Seidl said his top suggestion for computer safety is to be aware of the threats that exist.“Knowing the name of your anti-virus software and the risk of the sites you visit is important,” he said.He also suggested updating the computer regularly and maintaining confidentiality.“Do all updates,” Seidl said. “Most people I know click ‘ignore’ when the updating windows come up, but more and more attacks are happening on outdated browsers.“Last, never provide personal information where you shouldn’t. If you don’t provide that information, they can’t get it. For example, the Help Desk would never ask for your password, and no legitimate site should ask for a password unless you’re logging in.”Seidl encouraged students to visit secure.nd.edu/fakeav for more information on fake anti-virus scams and he advised any students with questions or concerns to go to the OIT Web site or the OIT Help Desk.last_img read more

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Council announces results, sanction

first_imgThe Junior Class Council and Sophomore Class Council election results were announced Wednesday night, while the Senior Class Council results will be withheld until Thursday night due to a sanction. Kevin Doherty will serve as junior class president and Nicholas Schilling won the position of sophomore class president. The Judicial Council delayed the announcement of Senior Class Council results due to a sanction against one of the tickets. Parker King and his running mates Ben German, Alicia Elliot and Brinya Bjork sent a campaign e-mail through a residence hall listserv, according to a Judicial Council press release. The student body constitution prohibits the use of listservs for campaigning. The Election Committee chose to invalidate eight votes cast for King’s ticket, a number that accounts for around 10 percent of the number of rising seniors living in the hall that received the e-mail. Judicial Council will announce the Senior Class Council election results tonight. Doherty and his running mates for Junior Class Council, Megan Rodts, Kim Neary and Nolan Welsh, won with 54.75 percent of the vote, or 536 votes. The second ticket, headed by Mike Weiss, earned 45.25 percent. 443 votes were cast for him and Julianne Crimmins, Mike Kress and Sean Hannon. Doherty said he looks forward to next year and being able to participate in something he truly loves. “I love meeting new people, ” he said. “I love having a vision and having the opportunity to put it into place.” Doherty said his main objective for next year is to have fun, and he is glad the results reflect students’ reactions to his ticket’s plans. “Throughout the whole campus I feel like people really resonated with us when we went and talked to them,” he said. “They really liked our ideas.” Weiss said although the election process was time-consuming, it was a great opportunity to be able to run. “It was really nice to get out and meet the class,” he said. “And I got to spend a lot of time with three really great people.” Schilling will lead the sophomore class next year, along with Paul DiGiovanni, Mary Clare Rigali and Margaret Preuss. The ticket garnered 56.98 percent of the vote, or 596 votes. The second sophomore ticket, Anthony Krenselewski, received 43.02 percent, or 450 votes. The other members of his ticket were Lizzie Helping, Jackie Picache and Alesandra Mendoza. Although the process was tiring, Krenselewski said, he had a great time running “We wish the best for Nick and them,” he said. “I’m sure they’re going to do a great job.” Krenselewski said he and the rest of his ticket plan to still be involved in student government. “Hopefully some of the ideas we had in place will still get done,” he said. Schilling, a Keough resident, said he looks forward to serving student government with fellow Keough residents Doherty and student body president-elect Pat McCormick. “It’s really neat to be able to have that connection to the other councils beyond just student government,” Schilling said. The other tickets running for Sophomore Class Council made the election process a great experience, Schilling said. “They were phenomenal,” he said. “It made all the work we did that much more important.” Schilling said he thinks the next year has a lot of potential for Sophomore Class Council. “We feel like we bring a really awesome ticket to the table,” Schilling said. “Hopefully we will be able to move forward very quickly to get things rolling for next year.”last_img read more

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Notre Dame wins Shamrock Series game

first_imgNotre Dame students and fans traveled to Indianapolis Saturday for the 2014 Shamrock Series game versus Purdue.The game, which was held at Lucas Oil Stadium, ended well for the Irish, who beat the Boilermakers of Purdue, 30-14.Michael Yu | The Observer Junior Colleen Pinkelman said the atmosphere in Lucas Oil Stadium was electric.“The stadium is a big pro stadium, which makes the atmosphere different from Notre Dame Stadium,” she said. “It was a really cool venue for the Shamrock Series.”Junior Julia Zanotelli said the proximity to South Bend made the game more accessible to students.“We drove, and it only took about 2 and a half hours,” Zanotelli said. “The game being so close contributed to a lot of students being able to attend, which made for a great student section.”Junior Andrew Cusator said the tailgating was was a highlight of the day.“The pregame atmosphere was second only to the main lot outside Notre Dame Stadium,” he said. “It was a great time with family and friends.”Pinkelman said the night game added to the excitement.“Night games have a whole different atmosphere than day games, and this game was no exception,” she said. “Just like the Michigan game, the night adds an extra amount of hype. It made the stadium more charged with energy.”Junior gold squad Notre Dame cheerleader Lizz Weir, said the trip to Indianapolis was fulfilling for the whole team.“Notre Dame did a great job planning the Shamrock series this year,” she said. “The weekend was so much fun and Indy was a really great atmosphere.“There was so much to do and the energy from all the fans before the game was something I cannot imagine happening at any other school. From fan festivals to parades to pep rallies, the cheerleaders were all over the place this weekend, but we enjoyed every second of it.”Zanotelli said there were definitely more Irish fans in the stands, but there was a good presence from Purdue as well.“I think it really helped being that both schools are in Indiana that there was a large showing from both teams at the game,” she said.Sophomore Noelle Gooding said the game itself was entertaining to watch.“Beating Purdue and moving up to 3-0 for the season made for a good time on Saturday,” she said.Tags: football, Indianapolis, Lucas Oil Stadium, Purdue, Shamrock Serieslast_img read more

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Students to perform service in seventh annual Back the Bend Day

first_imgNotre Dame students will venture into South Bend to participate in community service this Saturday, as part of the seventh annual “Back the Bend Day.” Rohan Andresen, director of the department for community relations, said Back the Bend is an option for students to serve in the South Bend community and is particularly geared toward those whose extracurricular activities do not typically include service. “Back the Bend is an annual day of community service and civil engagement,” Andresen said. “It’s a really good opportunity for students who aren’t engaged in clubs that normally do service to get the opportunity to do at least some service once a year.”Previously called CommUniversity Day, the name was changed last year to Back the Bend in recognition of the 150th anniversary of South Bend. This year, Andresen said there was a much bigger push to partner with South Bend organizations and include community members who are not students. “The role that Notre Dame has played with South Bend has really evolved since the beginning of Notre Dame’s time,” he said. “The stage we’re at now is moving from a point where we only did community service to having a partnership with South Bend. I think that working alongside members of the community not only shows that we’re supportive in the old-fashioned sense that we used to, but we’re also eager to partner with them and work alongside them to make it a better community for both of us.”As of Tuesday, approximately 150 people had signed up to participate, according to Andresen. He said this number should climb to anywhere between 250 and 400 participants by Saturday. To accommodate so many people, the organizers, including many community partners like the Robinson Center, planned a wide variety of projects.“The most popular ones and the ones students really flock to that are actually repeating from years past are murals at the Robinson Center and at Colfax Bridge, painting fire hydrants and art crosswalks, which are just crosswalks that are designed creatively,” Andresen said. “There’s one with piano keys, a Notre Dame-themed one. “Then there are ones that are more like manual labor, like working at Unity Gardens and doing whatever gardening stuff needs to be done, as well as restoring 1905 house. That’s put on Indiana Landmarks, and it’s an old Queen Anne house that students are going to help restore.”In conjunction with Back the Bend, director of campus ministry Ethan Muehlstein organized the Michiana Interfaith Crawl, also on Saturday from 10 a.m.- 3 p.m. The Crawl will provide transportation to several places of worship in the Michiana area. “[Muehlstein] approached me about having a joint event because it matches up perfectly with seeing the other parts of South Bend and civic engagement,” Andresen said. “I think it’s going to be a really great complement to the normal projects we usually do.” Muehlstein said in an email that the Interfaith Crawl is aimed to “establish new relationships with many faith communities in South Bend. ” “The interfaith crawl is paired with Back the Bend because it is getting students out and into the community, which is the focus of this annual event,” he said. “Each year we hope to establish a positive relationship with South Bend. Being a religious hub, this interfaith crawl allows students to really immerse in other cultures so close to campus.” Tags: back the bend, Community Service, michiana interfaith crawl, South Bend, Student governmentlast_img read more

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ND introduces diversity, inclusion director

first_imgOlivia Mikkelsen Faculty members welcomed Pamela Nolan Young, who was appointed earlier this month to the newly created role of Director of Academic Diversity and Inclusion, at a forum Thursday night in McKenna Hall. Young, Provost Tom Burish and several assistant provosts spoke about diversity and answered questions from faculty members. Burish said the forum was about “big things,” such as the faculty climate on campus for inclusion and diversity. “The recent focus on this topic started with the faculty experience survey, which was a recommendation of women faculty that came to see me a couple of years ago,” he said. “They suggested we do a survey so that all faculty could speak about their experiences at Notre Dame. It was a constructive, positive conversation. They were there to find solutions.” Young will be in charge of coordinating the University’s diversity and inclusion efforts, specifically regarding the faculty climate. “I’ve had three passions in my life: They are education, social justice and my faith,” she said. “As a law student in the late 1980s, I never imagined that those passions would evolve into a career path known as a diversity and inclusion practitioner.“I’m here to be a resource for deans, for department chairs, for faculty, for students and for staff.”A graduate of the Notre Dame Law School, Young said she was thrilled to be back at Notre Dame.“I began my professional career here and it is my hope that I will end it here as well. In the almost 30 years in between, I’ve practiced law, I’ve taught legal research and writing, I’ve served as a college administrator, I’ve earned a degree in educational leadership and established a consulting business.” With over 25 years of experience, Young will focus on addressing issues and weaknesses identified from the survey. Burish said that many recommendations resulting from the survey had already been made to his office. “The deans reported that in every school and college they met with some groups of faculty to talk about the survey results and to identify some ways of addressing the weakness and actions we could take at each level — department, college, university, etc. — and forwarded their recommendations to us,” he said. “I could not ask for more.”Young said her passion for social justice started when she was a child growing up in rural Alabama; She said the year she entered first grade was the first year the school was desegregated. “What we often think of now as social justice, I knew as a child as civil rights,” she said. “Often, we think of civil rights as a movement of the past. As champions of that movement pass, like our own Fr. Ted, it seems remote, distant and irrelevant. But for me and millions more, it is the story of our lives.”Tags: Diversity, inclusion, pamela nolan young, Provost Officelast_img read more

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Professors debate definition of marriage

first_imgIn a debate Thursday, Tom West, professor of politics at Hillsdale College, argued marriage should be defined according to early American state laws as an institution that is primarily for procreation, while Alexander Tsesis, Loyola University law professor, rejected this definition, saying it did not leave room for changes in the culture.While the debate, hosted by the Constitutional Studies Program and the Tocqueville Program, was meant to focus on the role of the Constitution in defining marriage, West said this question was primarily the focus of state laws.“The Constitution did not really have much to do with sex and the family because that was regarded as part of the state law … and so my focus is going to be mostly on state government policy on the subject because that’s where all the action was,” he said. Rosie LoVoi | The Observer Hillsdale professor of politics, Tom West, discusses the definition of marriage as part of a debate hosted Thursday in Jenkins and Nanovic Halls.West cited a quote from the Massachusetts Supreme Court from 1810, placing the importance of marriage in the idea that every marriage would produce children. “Marriage is intended to multiply, preserve and improve the species. … A lasting community needs children to create a lasting generation of citizens,” he said. Tsesis said taking the originalist interpretation of marriage from the core documents of our founding is a mistake. Instead, he said, the definition should allow for equality for the common good.“One of the problems with using the founding as the determinative is the lack of plasticity that it allows for developments in the modern age,” he said.After reviewing some of the changes in the interpretations of the Constitution and discussing the importance of human rights, Tsesis suggested a way for Americans to both use the core documents from our founding and apply them to modern day times. “I believe that grounding things in the principles of the Declaration of Independence — pursuit of happiness, life and liberty, general welfare — allows us as a nation to take those roots and to evolve in our interpretation of their thought in a pluralistic way … a way that uses the past as a critical anchor to our understanding, and yet does not also close our eyes to the development of American culture, so that those ideals exist despite the fact that this nation is marred by slavery, sexual inequality, Indian removal and non-white inequality,” he said.During the question and answer section of the lecture, Tsesis debated with West about what happens to women with ovarian cancer, or women who are in a postmenopausal stage and are unable to produce children if, according to West, marriage is centrally for the purpose of producing offspring. “What happens after they can’t have children? Can society bar them from marriage?” Tsesis said. “It would be uncountable for the government to deny 70-year-old men and women from getting married.”West responded by saying early state laws did not prohibit elderly people from marrying.“They didn’t have the view that people could not get married, just that if they were young and did not produce children, that could be grounds for divorce in some states,” West said. “For the founders, the question was ‘who’s going to be the future of America?’ They didn’t believe immigration was the answer, like we seem to today. They thought that was what marriage was for, and that’s why we discouraged sex outside of marriage.”Even attempts to gain a child through adoption offer a child that is “no one’s except for the law,” West said. Without a biological relationship to parents, he argued, a child will not be cared for as much.“You can adopt, but that’s not the same,” West said. “It’s not anyone’s child except by the law.” In response, Tsesis said many women “do not want to have children” and that the idea that they do and that women should focus on nurturing children is a “stereotypical view”. The lecture closed with a debate on the validity of marriage in the present and future. Prompted by an audience member‘s question about the legalization of polygamy, West said marriage as an institution is over.“We have replaced the model of raising children with the child support model,” he said. “Marriage is over. … At this point, the Supreme Court can define marriage however they’d like and it would make no difference. Men are being put under a mandate of being forced to pay for their children and are unable to take part in raising the child. So fine — polygamy, incest, what’s the difference?” West said men are not equal to women in this process, and if the state got out of the child support system, men and women could be equal. “The idea that we are in an area of equality is insane,” he said. “Men are always behind the eight ball in custody, marriage and children … and within a marriage women run it because she knows she can go divorce him and get child support.”In response, Tsesis said that marriage is “a central institution.”“I can’t imagine the government will get out of it,” he said. “If the government got out of child support the children would likely suffer and many males would be deadbeats and not give support because it would make their lives easier. But overall I think marriage is an institution and I don’t see any reason for it to end.”Tags: Constitutional Studies Program, marriage, The Constitution, Tocqueville Programlast_img read more

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Dining hall monitors discuss theft in South Dining Hall

first_imgBeverly Skopec and her fellow monitors at South Dining Hall have seen a wide variety of things stolen from their workplace. Some of them stranger than others, Skopec said. “Mary Ann [Sobieralski, head monitor at South Dining Hall] saw some guys take a big dining hall table, and she called security and they said, ‘Oh, we were just borrowing it,’” Skopec said. “Well, they should’ve told us, then.”Dee Michael, a fellow monitor, said she believes hundreds of dollars are being wasted every year due to dining hall theft — an issue she said is at its worst since she began working at Notre Dame eight years ago. “I talked to a manager about it [Monday], and he said he has never — in all the time he’s been here — had to buy so many supplies,” Michael said. “Our glasses are going out the door — plates, silverware too — let alone the food. If you say anything to the kids and tell them the rule is they can only bring out one thing, they don’t pay any attention. I would think that there’s hundreds of dollars going out the door.” Stolen less often than dining-ware are tables, which have disappeared a couple times this year, Michael said. “This year we also had two tables stolen — they have the Notre Dame ID on it and were made by a worker that recently died,” she said. “One of the managers found one outside the doors, and the other one magically appeared after we posted a sign about it.”Chris Abayasinghe, senior director of Campus Dining, said in an email that Campus Dining has had to replace thousands of dollars in property due to theft each year.“At the end of each year, we have some of the plates/cups/silverware returned to the dining halls,” Abayasinghe said. “Last year, we replaced approximately $10,000 in plates/cups/silverware.”Skopec said she has had her own experiences with confronting students.“One day I was coming in to work, a student was walking past me and eating ice cream with one of the blue bowls and a spoon and I said to him, ‘Did you get that from the dining hall?’” she said. “I think it’s like a challenge to them, like to see if they can get away with it.”Michael notices theft every day — both of food and utensils and other property — and said she thinks if there wasn’t theft of this nature the price of each meal would go down. “The price of each meal went up this year to $18.50,” Michael said. “If everybody did that … that’s why the rates are so high for the meals, because they have to adjust somehow.”Abayasinghe said when students are caught stealing food or dining-ware, the policy is to talk to them about the hall’s policy. “At the beginning of every school year, and towards the end of each semester, we’ve encountered students removing plates, cups and silverware [and] on occasion, our students taking food out of the dining hall,” Abayasinghe said. “We do speak with our students to educate them on our policies with dining in the halls.”Skopec said concerning food, some of the monitors will not be as strict as others. “A couple of the ladies upstairs have said some nasty things to students, but most of us are not really tough about it — if you want to walk out with something, you probably can,” she said. “ … If they’re eating it in their hand, we just let them leave with it.”Michael said every day she sees many people attempting to steal, and she is unable to stop about a half dozen of them.“My feeling is they’re going to have to leave college and go into the real world,” Michael said. “Once they do that, aren’t they going to have to follow the rules?”Tags: Campus DIning, Dining Halls, South Dining Hall, theft, theft on campuslast_img read more

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SGA hosts COVID town hall with President Conboy, other administrators

first_imgSaint Mary’s Student Government Association (SGA) hosted a COVID-19 town hall Wednesday evening with College President Katie Conboy and other administrators, who shared relevant information regarding the current state of campus. The conversation began with a question regarding the continuation of admissions tours despite the college-wide lockdown. Vice president for enrollment management Mona Bowe cited the decision being a business decision. “We are taking the necessary precautions on these tours as the majority of the tour is held outside, there are a maximum of 10 – 12 people — including the tour guide — on the tours and masks are required to be worn at all times.”The town hall was dominated by Conboy fielding questions and concerns regarding the closure of the College. “Let me begin by saying we are not intending to send students home at this point,” she said. “We are closely monitoring what’s going on on our campus, the tri-campus and greater St. Joseph community. We don’t want to overwhelm the local public health system at any point.’She said that this kind of strain has not been seen yet. Conboy continued to say that any drastic decision — whether that be online classes or a campus closure — will not be made based on any single statistic. She continued to contain the possibility of classes moving entirely online, with residence halls remaining open for students for whom it would be more advantageous for them to live on campus rather than move home. “If we all make good choices, I believe we will have a safer environment [at Saint Mary’s] than people would have most other places,” Conboy said. Cyndie Horton-Cavanaugh, a registered nurse, clarified the process for coronavirus testing on campus, saying “the current CDC recommendations are to administer a PCR test to all symptomatic persons.”  Students who are symptomatic or may have been in close contact with a COVID positive person are expected to call the Health and Counseling Center (HCC), the HCC will then bring students in throughout the day in small groups to get tested. Horton-Cavanaugh addressed concerns that the HCC has been denying students tests. “Many students come to us asking for a test for [their] peace of mind,” she said. “Peace of mind is not a good reason to get a PCR test –– there are shortages in resources, and when we do unnecessary testing we put a burden on testing laboratories and turnaround times which impacts our ability to contact trace in a timely manner.”A plan will be presented to the board of trustees Thursday that outlines the need and execution of surveillance testing on campus. “We’ve decided that we need to test more people, and random testing is the way to do this,” Conboy said. “While we can’t release too much [information] at this point, it could be a certain percentage of the student body every week.”The College’s general counsel Marty McCampbell added that once surveillance testing begins, Saint Mary’s will begin reporting the number of tests being conducted on the COVID-19 dashboard. Vice president for strategy and finance Dana Strait answered concerns regarding student safety and financial reimbursement.“If students are afraid, are they allowed to go home? Of course they are able to go home,” she said. “We are here to uphold our mission to support you and educate you the best way we know how.” Strait said drastic measures have been put in place to keep students safe, and that the College is confident they have provided the safest possible environment. In regards to financials, Strait said all of the College’s refund policies are available in the college bulletin. “We’re happy to initiate the refund process — depending on the point in the semester,” Strait said. “But, refunds for tuition, should classes go online, are not something we are able to do because we need to be able to pay our faculty.” Interim vice president for student affairs, Gloria Roldán Jenkins fielded questions regarding student behavior. “We have students that are nervous because there are certain students who are not making the right choices,” she said. Roldán Jenkins said there are protocols in place for addressing students who violate social distancing or masking requirements. “It can start with an email warning, and further action will vary on a case by case basis — we will not take chances if people are making bad choices that are affecting the entire community.” Tags: covid policies, Katie Conboy, Saint Mary’s College, town halllast_img read more

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BPU Awarded Money For Its Manufacturing Clean Energy Proposal

first_imgWNYNewsNow Stock Image.JAMESTOWN – The Jamestown Board of Public Utilities (BPU) has been awarded $750,000 in support by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) for its “Manufacturing Clean Energy in the Southern Tier” proposal. Officials say the BPU-led program is designed to facilitate innovation focusing on climate technology company formation, enhance regional workforce development, create jobs in the growing sector and strengthen connections among manufacturers across the Western Southern Tier counties of Chautauqua, Cattaraugus and Allegany.Awarded under NYSERDA’s “Accelerate the Southern Tier” program opportunity, which seeks to boost the formation and growth of early-stage innovation in the Southern Tier to help New York State advance its climate and clean energy goals and continues development of the region to help foster growth of climate technology businesses.“We are very pleased that New York State leadership recognizes that significant investment in climate technology manufacturing will benefit existing Jamestown-area companies as well as to help attract new companies to the region,” says BPU General Manager David Leathers. “This BPU-led program supports our western New York legacy as a manufacturing powerhouse in the State and speaks to our potential as a climate technology manufacturing resource for decades to come.” The Manufacturing Clean Energy in the Southern Tier project will encompass four initiatives:Climate Technology Studies designed to evaluate the regional and individual manufacturer’s potential to enter the climate technology manufacturing market in the Western Southern Tier.Climate Technology Workforce Development which will augment training and educational programming at Jamestown Community College.Climate Technology Manufacturing Conference and Tradeshow held in Jamestown and designed to attract manufacturing interests from across the country. The campaign promoting the Western Southern Tier’s status as a climate technology manufacturing hub for the expanding domestic supply chain.“Climate technology businesses provide a bright future for innovative manufacturers and, in the Western Southern Tier, we’re poised to capitalize on that future,” adds Jamestown Mayor Eddie Sundquist. “The Jamestown Board of Public Utilities stands as one of the most important economic development assets in our region. With our partners, this award will help us identify our shared potential to augment climate technology manufacturing, promote the region as a climate technology ‘hub’ and contribute locally to a 21st Century workforce.”“Jamestown and Chautauqua County businesses can only benefit from a program designed to augment our successful local companies and attract new partners, new ideas and new investment,” states Todd Tranum, Chautauqua County Chamber of Commerce president and chief executive officer. “Doing so now, at a time of critical need for our region, exemplifies our relentless determination to build a better future.”“The Gebbie Foundation looks forward to being a part of bringing a Climate Technology Conference and Tradeshow to the Jamestown area as soon as it is safe and prudent to do so,” says Greg Edwards, Chief Executive Officer at the Gebbie Foundation. “In keeping with the Foundation’s strategic focus of revitalizing downtown Jamestown, we invest in community and economic development projects such as this, that draw further investment from public and private partners. By becoming known as an ideal conference and convention location, we can attract people to our region to experience all the area has to offer.”This effort complements New York State’s national-leading climate and clean energy goals as outlined in the Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act to lower greenhouse gas emissions 85 percent by 2050. The Accelerate Southern Tier Awards complements other State innovation and economic development initiatives such as the 76West Clean Energy Business Competition and Southern Tier Soaring.76West recently awarded $2.5 million to four companies, to expand operations in the region, and previous competition finalists and semifinalists have successfully integrated themselves, raising $51 million in private capital, making multimillion-dollar investments in property and equipment in the region while spending more than $1.7 million on key suppliers.Workforce training through Jamestown Community College (JCC) will increase the number of available skilled workers with knowledge of clean energy-specific technologies.“Jamestown Community College is pleased to be part of the Manufacturing the Climate Technology Future in the Southern Tier consortium in partnership with the Jamestown Board of Public Utilities, which calls for a four-pronged initiative designed to facilitate climate technology company formation, growth, recruitment, and job creation across the Western Southern Tier counties,” says JCC President Daniel DeMarte.“JCC’s specific role in this initiative,” continues DeMarte, “is to develop a Climate Technology program comprised of fundamental courses in residential and commercial electricity as well as more advanced offerings in Building Automation Systems focusing on the installation, repair, and maintenance of computer-based systems designed to control a building’s mechanical and electrical equipment including heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) and energy management systems. Courses will be available beginning fall 2021.”Students in JCC’s program can also benefit from scholarship support from the Chautauqua Region Community Foundation (CRCF).“The CRCF is proud of its heritage administering over 300 scholarship funds to local students,” explains the Foundation’s Executive Director, Tory Irgang. “This partnership will offer our local students access to unique training and education for good paying jobs in this growing sector of our economy.”The intended impact from the program will extend beyond Jamestown’s borders across Chautauqua, Cattaraugus, and Allegany counties.“With more Americans working in climate technology-related industries than ever before, job growth in this sector continues to exceed expectations,” notes Mark Geise, Deputy County Executive for Economic Development and CEO of the County of Chautauqua Industrial Development Agency (CCIDA). “The CCIDA and our counterparts in the Western Southern Tier—a region with more than 330 manufacturers responsible for more than $7.5 billion dollars of commerce—see tremendous value in making smart investments in climate technology manufacturing.”Boosting manufacturers across the three counties is a significant goal of the program. Through individual manufacturing studies evaluating value-added investments in climate technology to a conference and tradeshow event meant to connect local firms with national investors and potential partners, new ideas and new jobs are on the agenda.“Emerging climate technologies and the long-term trend toward sustainable climate technology solutions presents myriad opportunities for manufacturers across the Western Southern Tier,” says Tim Piazza, talent pipeline and apprenticeship coordinator at the Manufacturing Association of the Southern Tier (MAST). “From individual studies analyzing a manufacturer’s potential to efficiently enter the climate technology supply chain, to conferences and shared marketing designed to draw attention to the region, the program’s benefits are substantial.”“I’m so proud of the JBPU and City of Jamestown team members who led the successful application process, along with a long list of local and regional community partners,” says Leathers. “This grant award outcome is recognition of a tremendous example of preparedness, teamwork and collaboration.”Supporters of the proposal include: the Chautauqua County Chamber of Commerce, the Chautauqua County Industrial Development Agency, the Chautauqua County Partnership for Economic Growth, Chautauqua County Visitors’ Bureau, Chautauqua County Education Coalition, Chautauqua Region Community Foundation, the City of Jamestown Department of Development, the Gebbie Foundation, Jamestown Community College, Jamestown Renaissance Corporation, the Manufacturer’s Association of the Southern Tier, and the Small Business Development Center. 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A Man’s A Man Star Justin Vivian Bond Obsesses Over Jessica Lange, American Hustle & Chex Party Mix

first_img SONG OR SINGER “This week I’ve been listening to June Christy and Linda Thompson’s new record Won’t Be Long Now which was named #1 folk album of 2013 by MOJO.” TV SHOW “Jessica Lange (who is also my celebrity crush), Patti LuPone as a Jesus freak, Angela Bassett as Marie Laveau: The Legendary Voodoo Queen of New Orleans and Kathy Bates as a “racist head” in American Horror Story: Coven? Are you kidding me!?! Nothing will ever be better.” ATHLETE “Uh…I like that Clothes Horse figure skater Ice Queen.” MOVIE “If I didn’t have rehearsals for A Man’s A Man right now I’d be at the Barbara Stanwyck Festival at Film Forum 24/7. I love her and have taken great inspiration from her for my role as The Widow Begbick. The film in current release that I’ve enjoyed most is American Hustle.” Theater stars know what’s hot in entertainment, fashion and pop culture, so Broadway.com decided it was high time to tap in to the after-hours obsessions of our favorite stage actors. Next up is Justin Vivian Bond, the performance artist who received a Tony nod for Kiki & Herb: Alive on Broadway in 2007 and begins previews on January 10 as sexual canteen proprietress Leokadia Begbick in Bertolt Brecht’s A Man’s A Man at Classic Stage Company. Below, Bond shares why Jessica Lange is crush-worthy, what makes Joan Didion’s work worth reading over and over again and why homemade Chex Party Mix should be everybody’s go-to snack. STAGE SHOW (OTHER THAN MY OWN) “I’m looking forward to seeing my friends Anthony Roth Costanzo as Orlovsky in Die Fledermaus at The Met and Taylor Mac with Mandy Patinkin in The Last Two People on Earth.” BOOK “The other day my friend Bradford Nordeen of Dirty Looks posed the following question on Facebook regarding Joan Didion: Slouching Towards Bethlehem or The White Album? I said The White Album, so I’m rereading it. I have no regrets.” CELEBRITY “I can’t stop imitating the ‘Long Island Medium’ (Theresa Caputo)!”center_img View Comments BEAUTY PRODUCT “Colbert MD Illumino Face Oil. LOVE IT! And, of course, the scent I created with the French perfume house Etat Libre d’Orange The Afternoon of a Faun, which is available in finer stores but you can only find the special limited edition packaging on my website.” FASHION DESIGNER “Rachel Comey invited me to sing in her spring/summer 2014 show and made me the gorgeous red lace dress I wore in my Christmas show. I love her.” APP “Witchvox.” RANDOM OBSESSION “Oh God. When I get anxious, I calm my nerves by making my own Chex Party Mix in my oven from scratch, then I eat it. Isn’t that awful? You can tell by my waistline I’ve been a bit anxious lately!” VACATION SPOT “What’s a vacation?”last_img read more

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