Crusaders v Sharks – Tickets go on sale for Super Rugby match at Twickenham

first_imgAll Black’s Dan Carter and Sonny Bill WilliamsFans of Investec Super Rugby in the Northen hemisphere have a special opportunity to watch the Round Six clash between Crusaders and Sharks which will take place at Twickenham on Sunday March 27, 2011 (4pm).The community of Christchurch was badly affected by last month’s earthquake and is the home of the Crusaders and the earthquake left their AMI stadium damaged. The Rugby Football Union is delighted to be able to offer support to the Crusaders and hope that rugby fans will be keen to make the most of this unique rugby spectacle and the opportunity to reach out to the people of Christchurch.Investec Super Rugby is the southern hemisphere’s premier club competition and features the five top teams from each of Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. The first match ever to be staged outside its home nations, this fixture forms the centrepiece of the Red Cross fundraising effort which aims to raise over £1 million for the Earthquake Appeal.Tickets go on sale today and fans have to be quick as there is only two weeks to go until the fixture kicks off. Tickets can be purchased online via rfu.com/tickets or by telephone 0844 847 2492 from 4pm today and £5 from each ticket sold will go to the charity. Tickets are priced at £50, £40 and £30 and will be half price in all areas for under 16s. NELSON, NEW ZEALAND – MARCH 11: Sonny Bill Williams of the Crusaders celebrates scoring a try with team mate Dan Carter during the round four Super Rugby match between the Crusaders and the Brumbies at Trafalgar Park on March 11, 2011 in Nelson, New Zealand. (Photo by Martin Hunter/Getty Images) RFU Chief Executive, John Steele, said: “Having some of the southern hemisphere’s best players on display at Twickenham will be a treat for all English based fans of Investec Super Rugby. It is great to see the rugby family pull together for such a worthy cause and we would like to thank all our stakeholders for their flexibility and support in making this happen. We now have less than two weeks to get tickets sold so we would urge supporters to get online and buy soon.”The Sharks currently top the Investec Super Rugby table with the likes of John Smit, Jannie du Plessis, Willem Alberts and Bismark du Plessis; while the Crusaders will be bringing a squad full of All Black talent including Dan Carter and Sonny Bill Williams. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Looking forward to the prospect of such a show case, Dan Carter said: “This is our chance to give something back to our close knit community which has been horribly impacted by recent events. We hope we can make a small difference. We are really looking forward to playing this match at Twickenham. It is a wonderful stadium and those of us that have played here before always enjoy it.”“It will be unique experience to play out of the home dressing room in what is a must win game for us in this regular season Investec Super Rugby match. We hope the rugby fans come out to support the teams and the Canterbury province”.last_img read more

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Future Faces – Ben Nutley and Luke McGrath

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS McGrath, who was born in Dublin and is now a member of the Leinster Academy, is in his first season with Ireland U20. He led the side against Scotland, scoring a try in the 26-0 win and being named Man of the Match. That victory set up the chance of a Grand Slam against England on the final Six Nations weekend, but a 20-9 defeat saw them miss out on the title. The former St Michael’s College pupil excelled playing rugby in his school days. He is sharp and has bags of pace, making life hard for back-rowers as he accelerates away from the side of the scrum, and is not afraid to put in the big tackles when needed.McGrath has also been picked to captain teams throughout his career thanks to his enviable leadership qualities, and he led Ireland U18 Schools to victory over their English rivals to win last season’s FIRA-AER European Championship. “Luke has got a lot of enthusiasm but is a very humble lad, always happy and smiling,” says Ireland U20 coach Mike Ruddock. “He’s intelligent and understands the game very well and is a good organiser on the pitch. He leads by example and is also quite vocal. He’s a lovely guy who has a bright future ahead of him.”Rugby World Verdict: McGrath is on the right path to reach the top of the game. Bea AspreyThis article appeared in the May 2012 issue of Rugby World Magazine. Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad. Ireland Under 20 Headshots 24/1/2012Luke McGrathMandatory Credit ©INPHO/Cathal Noonan *** Local Caption *** Would you like to sign up to Rugby World’s excellent weekly email newsletter? Click here.For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170center_img TAGS: LeinsterNorthampton Saints Ben NutleyBen Nutley(Northampton)Lewis Moody may have retired, but there’s a new flanker in his mould making his mark in the East Midlands – at Franklin’s Gardens. Ben Nutley, who turns 20 this month, made his Northampton debut in 2010, but it was at the start of this season that he really announced his arrival. He made his Aviva Premiership debut against Gloucester in the club’s opening fixture and has remained a regular in the match-day 22 ever since, in both league and Heineken Cup.Nutley grew up playing with his twin brother, Tom, at Stockwood Park in Luton, Moulton College and Northampton. Tom now plays for National One club Blaydon, while Ben’s first connection with the Saints came from his time at Moulton College, where he led the side and was coached by the club’s former lock Jon Phillips.He was soon drafted into the Saints Academy and has benefited from having experienced back-rows like Phil Dowson, Tom Wood, Roger Wilson and Calum Clark at the club to learn from. “They are all massive influences at Northampton and great for advice,” he says.Nutley is part of the England U20 squad, but his involvement in the recent Six Nations was limited as Saints retained him to play for the club while the likes of Dowson were on international duty. However, the Junior World Cup is on the agenda. England U20 coach Rob Hunter says: “Ben is robust and has a high work-rate – exactly what you want from a flanker.”Rugby World Verdict: Exposure to the Premiership is a good way for Nutley to develop. Bea AspreyLuke McGrath (inpho)Luke McGrath(Leinster)A good kicking game is an essential asset for scrum-halves to possess in today’s game, and it’s one that 19-year-old Luke McGrath certainly has. As if to prove this point, he kicked a drop-goal for Ireland U20 in their Six Nations victory over Wales in February.last_img read more

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Crusaders bolstered by All Blacks trio

first_imgChiefs v CrusadersFriday 6 July at Waikato Stadium, HamiltonKick:off – 08:35 BST Back in red: Carter shakes of a hamstring strain in time to face the table-toppersWITH THEIR play-off chances hanging by a thread, Coach Todd Blackadder will be happy with the return of Kieran Read (concussion), Dan Carter (hamstring) and Israel Dagg (ankle) who start against the Chiefs in Hamilton on Friday.After suffering a knock to the head during the All Blacks 3-0 whitewash over Ireland, Kieran Read starts at number 8, moving captain Richie McCaw to his favoured openside spot. Dan Carter slots in at 10, shifting Tom Taylor to the bench. While Sean Maitland who played at fullback last week, hands over the 15 shirt to Israel Dagg.With a shock defeat to the Hurricanes 23-22 last week, the seven-time champions are in danger of failing to secure a play-off spot, for the first time since 2001.The only other change to last week’s team is a rotation of the props, with Ben and Owen Franks taking the starting spots and Wyatt Crockett providing cover from the bench. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA – MAY 12: Dan Carter of the Crusaders looks on during the round 12 Super Rugby match between the Rebels and the Crusaders at AAMI Park on May 12, 2012 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Scott Barbour/Getty Images) Starting XV:15. Israel Dagg, 14. Adam Whitelock, 13. Robbie Fruean, 12. Ryan Crotty, 11. Zac Guildford, 10. Dan Carter, 9.  Andy Ellis, 1. Ben Franks, 2. Corey Flynn, 3. Owen Franks, 4. Luke Romano, 5. Samuel Whitelock, 6. George Whitelock, 7. Richie McCaw [C], 8. Kieran ReadReplacements:16. Quentin MacDonald, 17.  Wyatt Crockett, 18.  Tom Donnelly, 19.  Matt Todd, 20. Willi Heinz, 21. Tom Taylor, 22. Sean Maitlandlast_img read more

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Rugby Rant: No time for violence in rugby

first_imgThere is simply no place for violence in rugby and unfortunately it leaves me with no option but to retire from rugby as I cannot afford to meet another of these players.I don’t think this is a general reflection on the game. Duncan McRae hammered Ronan O’Gara on the 2001 Lions tour, but as a rule there is no time for it in top games. As the standard drops, the pace drops, and this allows the occasional player to commit such acts.The way to resolve  this is communication, whether it is speaking out after an incidentor challenging the team-mate involved. It is only a very select group that need to be weeded out – 99.9% of people involved in the sport would have nothing to do with these incidents. However, it doesn’t only reflect badly on the individual, but on the team, the club, the league and the entire sport.This article appeared in the January 2015 edition of Rugby World magazine. Click here for the latest subscription offers. Rugby is deeply ingrained in me. I love what it stands for and the bond it creates within a team and a club. I moved to work in England two years ago and my local club, Honiton, could not have been more welcoming.There is nothing I relish more than trying to steal ball and this has resulted in many trodden hands. However, over the past year I’ve encountered another side of the game whilst playing. It involves an older forward trying to teach youngsters a thing or two.Just a few weeks ago, admittedly slowing ball in a ruck, I had my ring finger grabbed and sharply twisted. A reminder with a stud would have been sufficient. I heard it pop and thought it was likely there was soft-tissue damage, but carried on.However, once the bruising had subsided, the swelling around the knuckle remained. X-rays showed a fracture involving the joint, and a general anaesthetic and a couple of screws followed (thanks to RD&E Hospital for such professional service).I’m a farm animal vet and I faced six weeks off work. Thankfully my employers at Synergy Farm Health have supported me, but if one of these characters is reading this rant, or you know someone who has a tendency for these misdemeanours, I’m hoping it will encourage them to think of the consequences. There is absolutely no place for violence in the game, says RW reader Alasdair Moffettcenter_img Punchy: Duncan McRae famously assaulted Ronan O’Gara during the 2001 Lions tour of Australia LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Patty Jervey

first_img“Patty was an ideal team-mate,” fellow 1991 Eagle Annie Flavin said. “A fiercely competitive worker on the field, just knowing she was in the back-line was always so reassuring, especially for a plodding tight-fiver.”In her club career, Jervey has also made a significant impact right up to recent years, as she’s helped Atlanta Harlequins win a Division One National Championship and has coached the USA Rugby South Women’s All-Stars. Major teams: Atlanta HarlequinsPosition: CentreCountry: USATest span: 1989-2006 A World Cup winner with the USA, Patty Jervey was among the group of first women’s players to be inducted into the World Rugby Hall of Fame and she is one of the most highly-regarded players of her generation in the American game.Over her 31-year rugby career, which began as a student at the University of South Carolina before she moved to play at a higher level at Florida State University, she won 40 international caps – a reflection of how little Test rugby the USA played until recently.She made her international debut in 1989 and remarkably the centre is still playing some rugby now – she played a club game on her 50th birthday. She attributes her longevity to regular bodywork, from massages to chiropractic sessions.Part of the team that beat England 19-6 at the first Women’s World Cup final in 1991, Jervey appeared in four more World Cups in 1994, 1998, 2002 and 2006, and ended her career as the highest point-scorer for her country with 178. TAGS: The Greatest PlayersUSA center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “I feel that I was born to play this game,” she says. “I know this because of those ten to 12 moments I’ve experienced in my career when it just feels perfect – the colour of the grass on the pitch, the sound you hear when the ball is in the air. I’ve had great moments when I have felt so connected to every element of the game – in the zone.”For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

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The 100 Best Players In The World: 10-4

first_img The 100 Best Players In The World: 80-71 Our next section of the 100 best players… Our next section of the 100 best players… The 100 Best Players In The World: 50-41 The 100 Best Players In The World: 90-81 The 100 Best Players In The World: 2 Beauden Barrett Our next section of the 100 best players… The 100 Best Players In The World: 50-41 Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook and Twitter. We kick off our list of the 100… Expand The 100 Best Players In The World: 90-81 The 100 Best Players In The World: 3 Mako Vunipola Expand The 100 Best Players In The World: 40-31 Expand He has been moved to the wing to accommodate other talents, but his maturity and intrinsic leadership skills make him invaluable to the ABs. “He’s a special person,” Steve Hansen says.6 Owen FarrellPivotal Figure: Farrell is key to England’s World Cup chances (Getty Images)Age 27 (24 September 1991) Position Fly-halfThe Saracen had a brilliant beginning to the Six Nations in a dominant display against Ireland but was strangely ragged against Wales and particularly Scotland, where his game disintegrated in front of our eyes in a surreal second half. Typical of the man, he bounced back and became a European champion for the third time when beating Leinster in Newcastle.Farrell was controlled and tactically supreme that day. His constant involvement and moment of pure class in giving the scoring pass to Sean Maitland for Sarries’ opening try was utterly critical to the outcome.“Owen makes decisions and executes unbelievably well,” says Danny Cipriani. “He’s a diligent athlete. The way he looks at things – and the way he drives things – is meticulous.”As he leads England into the 2019 Rugby World Cup, he must address his tendency to go shoulder-first into tackles because his country will not go far without him.In an eventful year on the pitch, he became a dad off it. If Tommy fancies a career in rugby, he won’t be lacking in advice from his father and grandfather!5 Liam Williams No Mistakes: Liam Williams has become one of the finest backs in the world (Getty Images)Age 28 (9.4.91) Position Back threeThe world’s best player in the view of Giselle Mather, who cites his try-saving tackle-jackal on Garry Ringrose in the Heineken Cup final as Exhibit A. “He’s a modern-day JPR Williams, a cult hero,” Sam Warburton says of the fearless, feisty full-back.4 Brodie RetallickUnlike Any Other: Retallick’s skills are unmatched in the lock position (Getty Images)Age 28 (31.5.91) Position Lock The 100 Best Players In The World: 70-61 Expand Welsh talisman Alun Wyn Jones takes the top… The 100 Best Players In The World: 100-91 Expand Expand The 100 Best Players In The World: 3 Mako Vunipola The 100 Best Players In The World: 60-51 Expand Cult Hero: Williams has become one of the best in the world (Getty Images) Our bronze medallist in the list of the… Expand Our next section of the 100 best players… Take a look at who has made it into the top ten of our 100 Best Players In The World list The 100 Best Players In The World: 30-21 The 100 Best Rugby Players In The World: 10-410 Tadhg Furlong Infinite Respect: Furlong is feared by all who face him (Getty Images)Age 26 (14.11.92) Position PropThe legend goes that during his time with Ireland U20 this normally restrained tighthead suggested that, so often was his defence highlighted in analysis, he should be called ‘Jukebox’ – because the hits keep coming. Now one of the most respected forwards on the planet, Furlong is feared in the tight and revered for deft handling in the loose.9 Viliame MataBig unit: The man mountain carries like no other (Getty Images)Age 27 (22.10.91) Position No 8John Barclay’s seen a lot in his time but he’s been blown away by his Edinburgh team-mate and master offloader: “I don’t know any player who carries the ball as well as him in traffic. I don’t think we’ve seen the best of him yet, that’s the scary thing.”8 Finn RussellPulses Racing: He can set the field on fire with his vision and creativity (Getty Images)Age 26 (23 September 1992) Position Fly-halfHe’s one of the top ten players in the world because every time he gets the ball you know he can do serious damage. He’s such a threat because his skill-set is ridiculous. His running threat is immense and defences can’t take their eyes off him for a second. He can chip, grubber and punt the ball to space, and his distribution off both hands has ripped world-class defences apart. He also makes good calls on intercepts and when he’s the other side of the defensive line, if he doesn’t finish the try he doesn’t die with the ball and helps set up another wave.7 Ben Smith Relied Upon: Smith plays a key role in the All Black back-line (Getty Images)Age 33 (1.6.86) Position Back threeOn the very rare occasions he makes a mistake, you can feel the rugby world gasp. He turns similes on their head: fixed structures should be described as being as steady as Smith.A half-back for a chunk of his teens, it wasn’t until Otago’s NPC coaches put ‘Bender’ at 15 that things clicked. With a whole field in front of him, his computer-like brain started deciphering things. It would still take a few years before the whole country saw how Smith’s ball-gathering, line-picking, field-covering work was perfect for the All Blacks. But he got there.He is not the biggest, the brashest or the most physical of characters – The Alternative Commentary Collective affectionately named him ‘Ben from accounts’. But it is for his resilience and his brilliantly efficient play that he is described as one of the great 15s. The 100 Best Players In The World: 70-61 The 100 Best Players In The World: 100-91 Expand Expand No lock in world rugby has Retallick’s range of skills. Who else could sell an audacious dummy from 40m out and canter in as he did against the Wallabies last August? It was voted Try of the Year. A beast in contact and set-piece – look how he destroyed England’s lineout last autumn – his offloading and handling in the wide channels sets him apart. Our next section of the 100 best players… The 100 Best Players In The World: 20-11 The 100 Best Players In The World: 40-31 Our next section of the 100 best players… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Our next section of the 100 best players… The 100 Best Players In The World: 60-51 The 100 Best Players In The World: 80-71 The 100 Best Players In The World: 2 Beauden Barrett The 100 Best Players In The World: 20-11 Expand Beauden Barrett narrowly misses out on top spot… Our next section of the 100 best players… The 100 Best Players In The World: 1 Alun Wyn Jones The 100 Best Players In The World: 1 Alun Wyn Jones Collapse The 100 Best Players In The World: 30-21last_img read more

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Rugby Rant: Scots cannot be afterthought for Lions

first_imgA generation of Scots may feel little affinity with the brand, writes RW’s Alan Dymock LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Late call-up: Greig Laidlaw replaced Ben Youngs on tour in 2017 (Inpho) Rugby Rant: Scots cannot be afterthought for LionsFor a number of Scots my age or younger, success for the British & Irish Lions over the last few outings has felt a bit like a party you’ve watched through a window. You have borne witness to some marvels but you still feel like an outsider.I was ten when the Lions were in South Africa in 1997. That tour was a milestone for so many reasons – the first pro tour, manner of victory and style of play, the fly-on-the-wall documentary that has not been surpassed. But for Scots it was meaningful representation. It felt like Scottishness was a big part of it.There is no ignoring the low standards of Scottish play as rugby ploughed through the Noughties and first half of the next decade, and in tours then only a few token spots came for players who’d never be considered for Lions Tests (Tom Smith aside). It still rankles that in 2005 Clive Woodward’s bloated group still had just one Scottish coach and 50-50 selection calls favoured bolters from further south.Consider the word ‘meaningful’ above. Scots do not want to feel like glorified mascots. It would mean a lot for future tours if there are coaches with intimate knowledge of Scottish players, their personalities, training traits. If few still make it, we know they’re highly valued.“You need Scottish accents in the support staff and trust in the Scots you do pick”The 2009 tour looked special as Ian McGeechan came back and brought the Wasps coaching band together again. There was still Dr James Robson and a couple of Scottish players. But by then, younger Scottish fans – many of my generation, who have no memory of glories or stories from the amateur era – were not being won over. They needed more than the wee nod.center_img Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. It’s about faith too. Warren Gatland likes Stuart Hogg, it’s clear. But in 2013 when he wanted the then 21-year-old full-back to play at ten, there was no Scottish figure beyond tour manager Andy Irvine who could query whether the team would get the best out of him in that position.“Oh, so you want ten Scots players in, then?” Nah. But an assistant who has worked with Scottish players is vital, you need Scottish accents in the support staff and trust in the Scots you do pick.After years of the blue quarter of the badge shrinking, let a younger generation see that however many tour, the Scots are a much-needed part of the shindig.This piece first appeared in Rugby World magazine in June. last_img read more

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Ireland Six Nations Fixtures 2021

first_img England Six Nations Squad 2021 Wales Six Nations Squad 2021 Improvement needed: Farrell and Sexton will need to be careful Scotland and Wales don’t overtake them (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Collapse England’s Six Nations ends with defeat in Dublin Wales Six Nations Squad 2021 Ireland close out the Six Nations with a… Ireland Six Nations Fixtures 2021The 2021 Six Nations fixtures have been unveiled, giving rugby supporters the chance to get super excited about the tournament.Last season was something of a transitional period for Ireland, with captain Rory Best retiring and Andy Farrell replacing Joe Schmidt as head coach. Beating Scotland and Wales in the Autumn Nations Cup will provide them with confidence going into the 2021 Six Nations, but it remains to be seen if they can catch up to France and England.Related: Ireland Six Nations SquadIreland start their 2021 campaign with a visit to Wales, before welcoming France to the Aviva Stadium. Round three sees them travel to Italy, followed by a visit to Murrayfield. Their final game hosts England in Ireland.Ireland Six Nations Fixtures 2021(All kick-off times are GMT)Round 1 Sun 7 February, Wales 21-16 Ireland Louis Rees-Zammit produces sensational finishRound 2Sun 14 February, Ireland 13-15 France France win in Dublin for first time since 2011Round 3Sat 27 February, Italy 10-48 Ireland Social media reacts to Iain Henderson try that wasn’tRound 4Sun 14 March, Scotland 24-27 Ireland Scotland score comedy try against IrelandRound 5Sat 20 March, Ireland 32-18 England Keith Earls try sparks Ireland rout of EnglandDon’t miss a game with our TV coverage guide2020 Six Nations ResultsRound 1Sat 1 February, Wales 42-0 Italy Reaction: Josh Adams scores a hat-trickSat 1 February, Ireland 19-12 Scotland Reaction: Stuart Hogg drops ball over the lineSun 2 February, France 24-17 England Reaction: France’s fire-up youngsters overcome England A hit and miss 2020 season will want to be rectified by Andy Farrell and his men, as they attempt to close the gap to France and England. Also make sure you know about the Fixtures, Injuries, TV Coverage by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram Expand Wales denied a Grand Slam by France’s 32-30… England Six Nations Squad 2021 Expand Ireland Six Nations Squad 2021 Round 2 Sat 8 February, Ireland 24-14 Wales Reaction: Jordan Larmour’s brilliant footworkSat 8 February, Scotland 6-13 England Reaction: England hold nerve in sodden Calcutta Cup boutSun 9 February, France 35-22 Italy Reaction: France go top after blowing hot and coldRound 3Sat 22 February, Italy 0-17 Scotland Reaction: Stuart Hogg scores scorching try in RomeSat 22 February, Wales 23-27 France Reaction: France keep Grand Slam bid on trackSun 23 February, England 24-12 Ireland Reaction: Sexton fumble leads to George Ford tryRound 4Ireland 50-17 Italy Reaction: Hugo Keenan scores double on Ireland debutEngland 33-30 Wales Reaction: Wales score stunner to bring clash to lifeScotland 28-17 France Reaction: Mohamed Haouas sent off against ScotlandRound 5Wales 10-14 Scotland Reaction: Scotland win in Wales for the first time since 2002Italy 5-34 England Reaction: Ben Youngs marks 100th England cap with two tries against ItalyFrance 35-27 Ireland Reaction: Cian Healy scores try on 100th Test appearanceSix Nation Squad and Team NewsEngland Six Nations SquadWales Six Nations SquadScotland Six Nations SquadIreland Six Nations SquadFrance Six Nations SquadItaly Six Nations Squad2019 Six Nations ResultsRound 1France 19-24 Wales Reaction: Yoann Huget howler gifts George North try in Wales’ comeback winScotland 33-20 Italy Reaction: Blair Kinghorn scores hat-trick in Six Nations try-festIreland 20-32 England Reaction: Henry Slade scores braces as England beat IrelandRound 2Scotland 13-22 Ireland Reaction: Jacob Stockdale scores a try, makes a try and stops a tryItaly 15-26 Wales Reaction: Wales equal record winning runEngland 44-8 France Reaction: Jonny May scores 30-minute hat-trickRound 3France 27-10 Scotland Reaction: Watch incredible Romain Ntamack tryWales 21-13 England Reaction: Wales stay on track for Grand SlamItaly 16-26 Ireland Reaction: Ireland struggle to see off ItalyRound 4Scotland 11-18 Wales Reaction: Watch the tries as Wales beat ScotlandEngland 57-14 Italy Reaction: Joe Cokanasiga entertains as England crush ItalyIreland 26-14 France Reaction: Johnny Sexton scores classic loop tryRound 5Italy 14-25 France Reaction: Marco Zanon error costs Italy victoryWales 25-7 Ireland Reaction: How Wales won the Grand SlamEngland 38-38 Scotland Reaction: England and Scotland draw in closer Follow our Six Nations homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Ireland Six Nations Squad 2021last_img read more

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Who is Jonny Hill: Ten things you should know about the England lock

first_img9. His initiation song after being capped was American Pie by Don McLean.10. Girlfriend Sarah Llewelyn has played netball internationally for Wales. She is a goal attack. 3. Growing up in farming country, his family are livestock dealers – a path Hill likely would have taken if the rugby career hadn’t worked out. Cider, farming, and netball – there’s plenty to discover about the Exeter man 5. His uncle, Paul Loughlin, used to play rugby league for Great Britain as a centre.Hill’s uncle Paul Loughlin prepares to kick for Great Britain (Getty Images)6. Hill was taken on England’s 2018 tour of South Africa, but remained as an unused replacement throughout the series.7. In August 2020, he scored his first professional hat-trick – making him the first second-row since Simon Shaw in 2003 to achieve the feat in the Premiership.8. An England bow finally came against Italy on 31 October 2020, making his debut in the delayed final round of the 2020 Six Nations. He partnered Maro Itoje, who he had played with in the U20 side. Jonny Hill trying to beat Andy Uren of Bristol in a Gallagher Premiership clash (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Who is Jonny Hill: Ten things you need to know about the England lockJonny Hill has enjoyed a meteoric rise since 2020, first making his debut for England and then being selected as part of Warren Gatland’s British & Irish Lions 2021 squad to tour South Africa.Hill was a key figure in Exeter’s double-winning 2019-20 season, forming a formidable partnership with Scottish international Jonny Gray. Here are ten more facts about the second-row.Ten things you need to know about Jonny Hill1. Jonny Hill was born on 8 June 1994 in Ludlow, a small town in Shropshire.2. He stands 6ft 7in tall, making him the tallest player in the 2021 British & Irish Lions squad alongside Courtney Lawes. 4. Alongside several team-mates, including Sam Simmonds, Hill helps to produce Rib Tickler cider. All local profits go to the Exeter Foundation, all profits from outside the area are sent to the Wooden Spoon charity.last_img read more

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Proposed liturgies honor creation, offer Daily Office alternatives

first_img Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Dick Gritz says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Tampa, FL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Carl Marinelli says: May 4, 2012 at 6:18 pm The grape juice issue is a big one for Native American ministries where there is a painful history around alcohol for many families. There were apparently already sensitive conversations happening under the leadership of Bishop Anderson on this issue since the 1980’s at South Dakota’s Niobrara Convocation, a traditional Lakota/Dakota Episcopal gathering that has served as an engine of a lot of culturally sensitive ministry in their Diocese (you can read an account here: http://theroadtopromise.com/tortured-water) .I know the Catholic church is pretty strict about this, but also that many Episcopal churches offer grape juice and gluten-free options to help those unable to safely partake (my communities in Boston, for example had to be especially sensitive given our work with street communities). I’d be curious to learn more about those Lambeth precedents, and what institutional or theological barriers are related this issue but it seems encouraging Bishops and Dioceses to use flexible discretion to serve the urgent needs of their communities without requiring one extreme or the other.Kieran Conroy, MDiv Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH April 26, 2012 at 4:29 pm Yes, there is a liturgy for deconsecrating a church in the Book of Occasional Services, called “Secularizing a Consecrated Building.” Andy Hook says: Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK April 26, 2012 at 5:06 pm I was inspired to read of the vigor of those carrying out the mission of the SCLM. We owe them great thanks for what they have accomplished thus far for the liturgy and music of our Episcopal Church. They are certainly helping us live into the name Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society! The comment by the Rev. Jennifer Phillips lamenting the lack of use of the Daily Offices in the life of the Church should resonate with us all. Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release April 26, 2012 at 6:09 pm I understand that we are a liturgical church, but does all of this liturgy undermine the use of extemporaneous prayer. I have seen paralysis set in with the absence of a printed liturgy. I would hope that our membership could respond prayerfully to circumstances not anticipated and addressed with published liturgy. April 26, 2012 at 10:02 pm I am delighted to learn of the development of liturgies for the blessing of gardens and of animals. Having searched for and developing both on my own in the last five years, guidance from more learned and gifted liturgists than I is welcome. I am also delighted to hear that they won’t be moving forward with Holy Women, Holy Men for another triennium. It needs considerable work and I would hope that SCLM would take into consideration the thoughtful feedback received on their blog over the last few years. April 26, 2012 at 9:47 pm In this marvelous age of immediate usage via the Internet, it would be wonderful if any of the proposed Liturgies approved for trial use at the forthcoming General Convention could be made immediately available. I am thinking especially of a Rite for the Blessing of Animals as well as an appropriate Rite for the Burial of a pet. I know of a retired UCC colleague who is in constant demand to officiate at the Burial of a pet, At a small nearby city, the Annual Blessing of Pets has become a community event centered in the gazebo of a public park with horses and every other possible pet. At one congregation I attended among over a dozen visited in traveling west from Ottawa to Vancouver and back through the States, I was reduced to tears of joy in seeing a pet parrot remain on a chorister’s shoulder as she knelt to receive the Blessed Sacrament. Our God of all creation speaks to us especially at such happenings! Liturgy & Music April 27, 2012 at 9:57 am I am very curious as to why any informed Anglican would question or “be unhappy about” the inclusion of Calvinists – or Calvin himself – in Holy Women, Holy Men! Those of us who still read the Thirty-Nine Articles understand that the Anglican Church was indeed founded on Calvinist principles. I guess the inclusion of that old Calvinist Thomas Cranmer is a source of of these folks’ “unhappiness!” Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY April 26, 2012 at 9:49 pm Honestly, I was disappointed that the SCLM has decided to not recommend an optional Creation season. When you say we are “in this time of a lot of ferment and anxiety” I have found that the issue of caring and being good stewards of the environment is a unifying practice. Given the recent pastoral letter from the House of Bishops concerning stewardship of the environment and the highly successful international webcast about the intersection of the poor and the environment initiated by TEC, I say that creation care and economic justice together is an important ministry for the Church right now. I appreciate the SCLM’s work on the more traditional days to address this issue, Rogation Days, St Francis Day et. al.; but a short optional season for Creation (during the long ordinary time) would offer an opportunity for a focused teaching season to address environmental issues. Frankly, I would not use the option if it would stir up anxiety in the community of if my Bishop said no. But, at the same time I know that younger members of the Church are ripe for a season to address environmental stewardship issues that are very close to their generation…. let’s talk about their anxiety! New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 the Rev’d Dr. Elizabeth Kaeton says: Frank Edmands says: Comments are closed. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service April 28, 2012 at 6:51 pm In theory all liturgies honor the Creator for they should be done in Jesus’ name. April 30, 2012 at 5:55 pm I am disappointed that the Creation Season liturgies will not be offered even on a trial or optional basis for those congregations who would like to use them. We have been creating our own for the past three years (from a website in New Zealand and other choices) and were looking forward to what our national church might offer. April 26, 2012 at 4:29 pm There is already a deconsecration liturgy for church buildings, I believe in the Book of Occasional Services. Submit a Job Listing Kieran Conroy says: May 4, 2012 at 6:27 pm Also, I love the idea of community processions, what a dynamic opportunity for witness and healing prayer for our communities. Been contriversal talk in the media of some aggressive “New Apostolic” groups “claiming cities” in aggressive forms of “spiritual warfare”- but there are wonderful precedents in the English and Celtic liturgical traditions for gentler forms of prayer to honor our culturally and eccumenically sensitive mission as Anglicans. Was blessed to lead a “Church in the Park” for a few years for the Crossing, Boston in the Common, and we’ve been pondering outdoor forms of prayer for the Tri-Faith Episcopal community here in Omaha, NE.It would also be really neat to see ways to complement and learn from existing “liturgies of the street” like the masses held in many cities by the Ekklesia movement for and by homeless communities. (begun in the Episcopal Cathedral in Boston, but with a number of eccumenical projects in many cities. http://www.ecclesia-ministries.org/)Kieran Conroy, MDiv Rev. K. Gordon White says: Rector Knoxville, TN Proposed liturgies honor creation, offer Daily Office alternatives pat milliren says: Seamus P Doyle says: Rector Martinsville, VA April 26, 2012 at 4:19 pm Is there any liturgy relating to the deconsecrating, retirement from use, etc., of churches, crosses, gardens, etc.? How might such things be best commemorated? Kieran Conroy says: Lynn Marini says: May 2, 2012 at 5:49 pm One of the things I like about the BCP in use in Australia or at least its alternate version is the inclusion of a different Office for Morning and Evening Prayer every day of the week. The basic structure is there but there are different canticles, prayers and scripture verses that are right there on the page, no flipping through the book or going back and forth. It would be nice if at some point the SCLM would come up with something similar. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Melanie Barbarito says: The Rev. Daniel Hanna says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET David Morath says: Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York General Convention, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group D. Jonathan Grieser says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Richard Angelo says: April 26, 2012 at 11:04 pm I am glad to learn that the process of proposing HWHM is being slowed down. I’m delighted to learn that there will be more collaboration with women’s groups to include more women. I’m hoping for the same collaboration with indigenous and other racially communities so there can be more and varied “saints” whose lives enrich our religious lives of faith. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET May 4, 2012 at 6:34 pm Oops- here’s the link I was looking for, the page listing all of our affiliates (including Outdoor Church, Cambridge where I served as a student minister)http://www.ecclesiaministriesmission.org/apps/links/ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID April 26, 2012 at 6:30 pm Seventh para from the top refers to questions regarding Ordination. Can someone tell me to what that is referring? Tags By Sharon SheridanPosted Apr 26, 2012 Rector Collierville, TN April 27, 2012 at 10:34 am I agree with Michael about The Message. It’s a great resource for Bible study, but I’ve heard it used during the Eucharist and it was just cumbersome. Rector Smithfield, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ [Episcopal News Service] While much public attention focused on its work on same-gender blessings, the Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music tackled multiple other issues during the 2010-2012 triennium.“The work that is put into the lap of the Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music is breathtaking,” said the Rev. Jennifer Phillips, commission vice-chair and rector of St. Francis Episcopal Church, Rio Rancho, New Mexico.The SCLM Blue Book report to General Convention offers new rites for honoring creation and the care of beloved animals as well as prayers to supplement the Daily Office. It contains resolutions to authorize continued trial use of Holy Women, Holy Men (successor to Lesser Feasts and Fasts) and to include new commemorations within it. And it proposes forming a congregational song task force and expanding the World Music Project’s work.The commission’s report also recommends continued work toward revising the Book of Occasional Services, addressing Christian anti-Judaism and developing liturgies for the adoption of children.Proposed ritesThe proposed rites honoring creation include materials for observing Rogation Days, the blessing of the animals on the feast of St. Francis or the nearest October Sunday and prayers for “civic occasions” such as Earth Day or Arbor Day or blessing a community garden. The commission developed the liturgical materials in response to 2009 General Convention resolutions to establish a “Creation Cycle of the Pentecost Season” but ultimately decided not to recommend creating an optional season.The commission recognized that some denominations and some parts of the Anglican Communion have embraced the idea of a separate cycle, Phillips said. But members also discussed how “the Revised Common Lectionary is new to use in our church, still being understood and worked on and developed and introduced. … The SCLM thought it might be really ill-advised to suddenly encourage people to deviate from the Revised Common Lectionary.”“When you’re in a time of a lot of ferment, which we are, and anxiety about sexuality and all of these kinds of questions about authority and the Bible and ordination and so forth, rocking the boat with other things is not always timely,” she said. “So basically we wanted to make materials available [and] to recommend their use on other than the main service on Sundays.”The rogation rites weave together the English tradition of walking the boundaries of a parish and the wider church practice “of public processions and litanies in times of war and disease, in times of crisis,” she said. “For urban centers, there used to be processions in which there would be the public singing of a long litany, praying for defense.”While Episcopal churches don’t have the same sort of geographic boundaries as the old English parishes, “what does make sense is being intentional about offering intercessions for the life of your local community,” she said. When an urban parish holds a procession, even if it’s just a walk through the neighborhood, “it makes the church visible to the surrounding culture.”“In this time that we have such critical concerns for the earth,” she added, the rites allow everyone “to give thanks for the fruitfulness of the earth, to pray about its care and preservation and to do that in both urban and rural settings.”“So it’s not just a pastoral liturgy, but it’s something you can pray in the midst of the city.”In response to a 2009 resolution about rites for companion animals, the commission developed a Burial Office for a Beloved Animal and other prayers for use at the adoption, illness, loss or death of companion or service animals.The creation and beloved-animal rites are not one-size-fits-all. Not all congregations do the blessing of the animals, for example, and those that do may bless them in a parking lot or process them down the main aisle of the church during a worship service, Phillips noted. “St. John the Divine [cathedral in New York] brings in the elephants. Every place kind of sets its own style, but this will enable some prayers, some litanies, a kind of form that people can draw on that we hope will create a good standard.”Daily prayerThe Daily Prayer for All Seasons is proposed “for experimental use by individuals and in congregations and other church groups wishing to pray or meditate throughout the day,” according to the Blue Book resolution. It is intended to complement the Daily Offices and Daily Devotions within the Book of Common Prayer.“Those are really wonderfully rethought for a contemporary audience,” Phillips said. The idea is to offer “not a replacement, but an alternative to what’s in our prayer book to appeal differently, to fit into people’s complicated and post-modern lives.”She believes they will be especially useful in places like college campuses or with retreat groups, “but especially for people to carry around in their car, maybe have an application on their mobile phone that they can pray an office … in 10 minutes.”“We have a long tradition, precious tradition of daily offices, which was the gift of the great reformers of Anglicanism who desired to take the prayer of monasteries and to make it available to ordinary people in a form suitable for their real lives working in the world. That’s a huge gift, and so it is kind of a shame that the offices have fallen into such disuse.”The hope is that the new prayers, which contain hymn texts, readings from various places and questions to meditate on, may draw new people into praying the offices. While “a little more free-form and contemporary in feel,” she noted, “they still contain some shadows of the ancient structure. They’re just really pared down.”Holy Women, Holy MenThe commission recommended that Holy Women, Holy Men, which was presented at the 2009 General Convention and greatly expanded the number of commemorations on the church’s calendar, continue to be offered for trial use and that SCLM continue inviting responses to it and developing the volume. The commission would present a revised edition in 2015 for a first reading.“It’s a huge compendium,” Phillips said. “There is controversy about some bits of it. There are people who are unhappy to have Calvinists included, including Calvin himself. There are people who wonder about the proper orthodoxy of some of the non-professional Christians like John Muir. … There are figures that are brand new to people, and folks haven’t quite had a chance to get accustomed to who they are and where they came from.”“The feeling was [that] it needs more time and that if we act precipitously we might make decisions that later we would regret,” she said.As directed by General Convention, the commission added Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall to Holy Women, Holy Men, the commission report said.SCLM also asks General Convention to direct it “to consult with the Executive Council Committee on the Status of Women, the Episcopal Women’s History Project and other organizations of women in the Episcopal Church to identify women suitable for inclusion.” And it proposes trial use commemorations for the next triennium for: James Solomon Russell, Emily Cooper, Junia and Andronicus, Pauli Murray, the first ordination of women to the priesthood in the Episcopal Church, Virginia Dare and Manteo, and Thecla.HymnalBased on the results of a feasibility study, the commission did not recommend revising The Hymnal 1982.“Really, there was no consensus within the denomination whether we should pursue the renovation of the hymnal,” said John Repulski, SCLM secretary and music director at Christ Episcopal Church Cranbrook in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan.The exception was in Province 9, where clergy and musicians “expressed clearly to the research interviewers that the currently available authorized musical resources of the Episcopal Church do not meet their needs in terms of worship style, theological and cultural context, and affordability,” the SCLM report said.“We Episcopalians, what we reiterated for ourselves in that survey is, we love our books,” Phillips said. “Even though there are some better and worse supplements available and authorized out there … the mainstream still loves the hymnal and wants to use the hymnal and wants to have a hymnal that they can hold in their hand. But Province 9 is feeling underserved, that the material does not fit their cultural needs.”Consequently, the commission recommends forming a congregational song task force to “explore a variety of musical resources and foster musical leadership able to learn, perform and teach various musical styles,” the SCLM report said.“While the data does not point towards revision at this time,” it said, “it does indicate the need to begin an in-depth process of discernment as to what new music beyond the current set of authorized resources will inspire and revitalize our congregations. A process of carefully observed and rigorously measured trial use of music that is currently beyond what is authorized would be at the heart of this discernment.”Repulski said he hoped the task force would enable “really a lot of broad information gathering,” looking at questions including whether people would like musical resources in forms other than printed books.The task force also would incorporate and expand the work of the World Music Project, according to the report.To help provide resources for Province 9, where congregations typically learn music by rote listening rather than from books, a group of musicians recorded about 15 songs from El Himnario that will be released by the time of General Convention, Repulski said. SCLM is still discerning the best way to circulate the materials and in what format. Video as well as CD formats are planned, and versions will be available with instrumentation only, he said.Repulski also is an administrator in a new Facebook page for Episcopal Church musicians that rapidly gathered 450 members. “There is definitely a need for us to talk,” he said. He hopes the outcome will be “just some more conversation between all the musicians in the Episcopal Church.”Other SCLM resolutions propose:continuing revision of the Book of Occasional Services;authorizing continued use of Enriching our Worship 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5;continuing to “collect, review and disseminate materials to address Christian anti-Judaism expressed in and stirred by portions of Christian scriptures and liturgical texts”;revising prayer book Holy Week liturgies to conform with the Revised Common Lectionary;continuing to develop liturgies for the adoption of children;adding The Message and the Common English Bible as approved translations for use during worship;setting translation standards that include reflecting “the idiomatic style and cultural context” of the languages used;providing $105,000 for SCLM meetings and $202,000 for developing and reviewing liturgical resources as mandated by General Convention and church canons.— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent.In Spanish:  http://bit.ly/KqEUjE Rector Bath, NC Kieran Conroy says: Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Comments (21) Featured Events Dave Hedges says: Tom Sramek Jr says: April 30, 2012 at 8:07 pm Amen and heartfelt gratitude for this valuable ministry. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET May 3, 2012 at 4:06 pm When will the GC deal with the issue of using Grape Juice. It is used in many parishes with and without the permission/approval of the Bishop. The basis for not using it is to be found in the Lambeth Conferences of 1888 and 1908. Isn’t time for a revision. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME May 15, 2012 at 12:20 pm Thank you for informing me that “The Anglican Church was indeed founded on Calvinist principles.” I must have missed that in Church History. Though there were important influences due to the “Continental Reformers,” Anglicanism finally settled on its own pilgrimage, apart from the excess of either Rome or Calvin. As to the 39 Articles, they were never, as far as I am aware, “officially” adopted as part of the teaching of the Episcopal Church; added only to the “Historic Documents” of the Book of Common Prayer. Thus they were never given the same “weight” in the American Anglican Church as they were in England. As to the old Calvinist Thomas Cranmer, we know what happened to him – a man of his time and ultimately on the wrong side of Church History & Church politics. That doesn’t preclude his making a silk purse out of a sow’s ear, only that his work has become, through time, study & growth less Calvinist, as the Church has “matured,” back to its Catholic roots and the excesses of Reform. Fr. Steven A. Scarcia says: John Buck says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, ORlast_img read more

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