Brains transplanted into wrong bodies at Uni hospital

first_imgTwo brains were mistakenly transplanted into the wrong bodies during a post-mortem at the John Radcliffe Hospital.The mishap was one of 278 ‘serious incidents’ which occurred in mortuaries across England, Wales and Northern Ireland from 2014 to 2016, according to a BBC Freedom of Information Request (FOI).The John Radcliffe, one of four Hospitals in Oxford’s NHS Foundation Trust, collaborates with the University for research purposes and is the most popular base for clinical medical students.A spokesperson for Oxford University Hospitals told Cherwell: “This very regrettable incident, for which Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and individuals have apologised to the families, was an error in the labelling of two brains during a specialist examination as part of the autopsy process.“The mistake was promptly recognised by staff working in the mortuary at the John Radcliffe Hospital and rectified.“This incident was reported to the Human Tissue Authority and the Trust also commissioned an external expert to carry out a thorough investigation and review processes in the mortuary in order to help us ensure we prevent anything like this happening again in the future.”A medical student said: “From the time I’ve personally spent with corpses or body parts, it can be easy to forget that these were once living breathing people with families.“When dealing with such sensitive material we should always be respectful and treat the body parts in a manner that their owners would have desired.“In these incidents I feel that people have perhaps not been as meticulous or thorough whilst carrying out their work as they would have been if they were dealing with a living patient.“Death can be distressing and when these types of incidents occur it simply makes things even worse for those involved.”Rosa Curson Smith, a second year at Hertford College, told Cherwell: “whilst this may seem like an amusing mix up to those not involved, it presumably caused deep upset for the families of the deceased.“Oversights like this should be avoided when operating on the dead as well as the living .”A St Peter’s student added: “It is key that doctors and medical staff are open and honest to those close to the deceased individual about the mistakes made.”Tyron Surmon, a student at Corpus Christi, said: “How could they not have done it right? “The operation was a no-brainer.”last_img read more

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News story: “Men need support too” gender expert tells women in Cumbria

first_imgRecognising the unique contribution that Cumbria makes to the nuclear sector, ‘Women in Nuclear (WiN) UK’ launched the dedicated ‘Cumbria’ branch in 2018.Since its launch, the WiN Cumbria network has become a powerful community of local organisations and individuals working together to achieve gender diversity within the Cumbrian workforce.Trudy Harrison MP has also backed WiN Cumbria as a key player in helping achieve one of the ambitions laid out in the Nuclear Sector Deal, to see 40 per cent more females working in the industry by 2030.The team is also nominated for a Northern Power Women award, which will be announced at a ceremony in Manchester on 18 March.To find out more about how WiN Cumbria can support you, contact [email protected] She made the bold statement at the first birthday celebration of the Women in Nuclear (WiN) Cumbria group on International Women’s Day (8 March).More than 150 people from 30 businesses across the county gathered at the Energus centre, Lillyhall, to celebrate the achievements of the branch, and discuss what still needs to be done to progress gender balance in the nuclear sector. This wasn’t just a celebration and a pat on the back, it was a way for us to move the conversation to the next level and see what we can do next to make real changes to gender inequality. Our guest speaker, Nadia, provided the ‘penny drop’ moment of the day when she told us that society doesn’t allow men to break free of their stereotypical ‘bread winner ’role, which in turn impacts on a woman’s choices too. This really hit home with our audience as we understand men have an important part to play in creating the change. Nadia’s findings are based on strong research, so it is something WiN Cumbria is going to take forward, to see how we can help address some of the issues facing men in Cumbria, like flexible working and unconscious bias, for example. I urge anyone, male or female, with an interest in helping to drive gender balance in the area, to join us as we continue our mission to create an inclusive and fair environment that helps attract, retain and build a diverse workforce of the future, for Cumbria and the UK.center_img The WiN Cumbria team has created a powerful network of individuals and businessesSpeakers included Rebecca Weston from Sellafield Ltd, chartered psychologist and gender equality expert, Nadia Nagamootoo and Paul Howarth from the National Nuclear Laboratory.Chair of the WiN Cumbria, Claire Gallery-Strong, said;last_img read more

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