ND introduces diversity, inclusion director

first_imgOlivia Mikkelsen Faculty members welcomed Pamela Nolan Young, who was appointed earlier this month to the newly created role of Director of Academic Diversity and Inclusion, at a forum Thursday night in McKenna Hall. Young, Provost Tom Burish and several assistant provosts spoke about diversity and answered questions from faculty members. Burish said the forum was about “big things,” such as the faculty climate on campus for inclusion and diversity. “The recent focus on this topic started with the faculty experience survey, which was a recommendation of women faculty that came to see me a couple of years ago,” he said. “They suggested we do a survey so that all faculty could speak about their experiences at Notre Dame. It was a constructive, positive conversation. They were there to find solutions.” Young will be in charge of coordinating the University’s diversity and inclusion efforts, specifically regarding the faculty climate. “I’ve had three passions in my life: They are education, social justice and my faith,” she said. “As a law student in the late 1980s, I never imagined that those passions would evolve into a career path known as a diversity and inclusion practitioner.“I’m here to be a resource for deans, for department chairs, for faculty, for students and for staff.”A graduate of the Notre Dame Law School, Young said she was thrilled to be back at Notre Dame.“I began my professional career here and it is my hope that I will end it here as well. In the almost 30 years in between, I’ve practiced law, I’ve taught legal research and writing, I’ve served as a college administrator, I’ve earned a degree in educational leadership and established a consulting business.” With over 25 years of experience, Young will focus on addressing issues and weaknesses identified from the survey. Burish said that many recommendations resulting from the survey had already been made to his office. “The deans reported that in every school and college they met with some groups of faculty to talk about the survey results and to identify some ways of addressing the weakness and actions we could take at each level — department, college, university, etc. — and forwarded their recommendations to us,” he said. “I could not ask for more.”Young said her passion for social justice started when she was a child growing up in rural Alabama; She said the year she entered first grade was the first year the school was desegregated. “What we often think of now as social justice, I knew as a child as civil rights,” she said. “Often, we think of civil rights as a movement of the past. As champions of that movement pass, like our own Fr. Ted, it seems remote, distant and irrelevant. But for me and millions more, it is the story of our lives.”Tags: Diversity, inclusion, pamela nolan young, Provost Officelast_img read more

Read More

The data security act of 2015: How credit unions benefit

first_imgThe U.S. House Financial Services Committee recently passed the Data Security Act of 2015. The bill has some positive implications to credit unions and financial institutions, but does present some challenges for state privacy laws and small businesses. The act would establish consistent standards nationwide for data security requirements and data breach notification requirements.Without the act, if a merchant is negligent to upgrade security software to protect cards on file, or a small merchant doesn’t implement necessary security to protect credit and debit card information collected over the internet, in-store, or over the phone, the card issuer is responsible for making the cardholder whole in the case of breach of the cardholder’s data. That is to say, the merchant, the one handling the card data, is not liable for the fraud incurred even if it is under their control. The roll-out of EMV does not address breaches of the millions of card data being stored by merchants. Also when there is a breach, there is no rule that says when or if the breach should be announced, and to whom.Great for Credit Unions. Challenging for Small Businesses.The Data Security Act is written to level the playing field by creating a nationwide standard to address these holes. This is great for credit unions as it potentially decreases the cost of fraud by forcing merchants to meet federal standards while not adding any additional burdens to credit unions. However, it may not be great for small business owners, who may not be aware of, or be able to meet compliance standards. continue reading » 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Read More