The anti-terrorism law threatens press freedom

first_imgThe Official Secrets Act, renamed the Security of Information Act, will henceforth punish to “imprisonment for life” the supplying of sensitive information “to any foreign entity or terrorist group”. According to article 16, the information concerned is that “about which the federal government or a provincial government takes protective measures”, without any further detail. Article 17 approves the disclosure of “special operational information”, including information of public interest such as the “vulnerabilities or limitations” of the policy of information implemented by the federal government. The Senate is to vote on Bill C-36 before the end of December. The draft law submitted on October 15th, 2001 under the name of “the antiterrorist law” by the minister of Justice, Anne McLellan, received 190 votes for and 47 against on November 28th in the House of Commons. In a letter sent to the Canadian senators, Reporters Sans Frontières (Reporters Without Borders, RSF ) has asked them not to pass several articles contained in anti-terrorist Bill C-36, passed last November 28th by the House of Commons. “This bill includes numerous articles that are dangerous for the protection of sources,” stresses Robert Ménard, RSF’s secretary-general. “Moreover, the news that can be sanctioned if circulated with life imprisonment is especially poorly defined. Certain kinds of news even reach into the public-interest sector. The legitimacy of the fight against terrorism cannot lead you to jeopardising freedom of the press. It is a genuine pillar of Canadian society.” CanadaAmericas According to information gathered by RSF, anti-terrorism Bill C-36 was approved on November 28th, 2001 by the House of Commons. It modifies several existing laws, including the Criminal Code, the Official Secrets Act and the National Defence Act. And several articles in this bill cast the protection of sources into doubt. One modification of the National Defence Act enables the Minister of the Defence to authorise the Communications Security Establishment (CSE) to intercept private communications between Canada and other countries with a view to obtaining information relating to “international affairs, defence or security” (Part V.1, “Communications Security Establishment”). The confidentiality of communications between journalists and their foreign contacts is no longer guaranteed. News News to go further RSF has asked the Canadian senators not to pass several articles contained in anti-terrorist Bill C-36. The organisation stresses that numerous articles are dangerous for the protection of sources. Moreover, the news that can be santionned if circulated with life imprisonment is especially poorly defined. December 12 2001 November 19, 2020 Find out more The new bill also enables the government to require a person for whom there are “reasonable grounds to believe that he/she has direct and material information that relates to a terrorism offence ” to be summoned by a judge to divulge this information. Anyone refusing to respond to the judge’s summons or to answer his/her questions may be imprisoned for up to one year (Part II.1, “Terrorism”, articles 83.28 and 83.29). Receive email alerts RSF_en News CanadaAmericas Follow the news on Canada Organisation Help by sharing this information November 11, 2020 Find out more News January 15, 2021 Find out more “We must impose democratic obligations on the leading digital players” Update – 19 December 2001 On eve of the G20 Riyadh summit, RSF calls for public support to secure the release of jailed journalists in Saudi Arabia December 19, 2001 – Updated on January 20, 2016 The anti-terrorism law threatens press freedom Antiterrorist bill comes into forceThe 18 December, General Governor of Canada Adrienne Clarkson promulgated the C-36 Bill, a few hours after the Senate had voted it. The House of Commons had already approved it by the end of November. Forum on Information and Democracy 250 recommendations on how to stop “infodemics”last_img read more

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Road closure after Fermanagh crash causes chaos for Pettigo traffic

first_img WhatsApp 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Google+ Twitter Pinterest By News Highland – January 14, 2013 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire Facebook Road closure after Fermanagh crash causes chaos for Pettigo trafficcenter_img Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Pinterest News Google+ Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Previous articleGAA – Harte Happy With Tyrone’s ProgressNext articleDerry man returned for trial on explosive charges News Highland WhatsApp There’s been a serious road collision on the Belleek to Kesh Road in Fermanagh which was being used as a diversion route following an earlier fatal crash outside Pettigo.This means that anyone wishing to travel from Pettigo to Laghey must go via Enniskillen.The Fermanagh road is now closed from Rosscoir in Belleek and Leiter in Kesh, forcing all traffic to travel via Enniskillen.Gardai in Ballyshannon are urging people to avoid the area if possible.The Pettigo to Laghey Road has been closed since shortly after midday today when a lorry driver, believed to be from Eastern Europe was killed in a single vehicle collision.It’s understood he works for a company based in County Monaghan. Facebooklast_img read more

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HMS Echo Becomes First Royal Navy Vessel in ‘The Gateway of India’

first_img View post tag: Gateway View post tag: vessel View post tag: Royal April 30, 2012 Survey ship HMS Echo became the first Royal Navy vessel in ‘the gateway of India’ in five years when she sailed into the metropolis that is Mumbai.It allowed a change of some crew (the ship regularly rotates around one third of her sailors to sustain her mission away from the UK) and a chance to sample one of the great cities of the world.As befits Mumbai’s status it is one of the Indian Navy’s principal naval bases and it fell to the crew of the guided missile frigate INS Godavari – similar in size to the UK’s Type 23 frigates – to host Echo throughout her week in Mumbai.The visit provided the opportunity to meet senior Indian Naval staff, festively ‘dress ship’ with colourful flags from bow to stern to mark an Indian national holiday, and host and attend official receptions allowing sailors from both navies and their families to mix.The two ship’s companies also enjoyed tours of each other’s vessel; Echo’s hydrographers proudly showcased the ship’s state-of-the-art survey suite to their counterparts from the Indian Navy.A group from Echo’s crew were hosted onboard Godavari and enjoyed a fascinating tour and delicious Indian buffet whilst berthed adjacent to INS Viraat – perhaps better known to Britons as HMS Hermes.HMS Echo’s football team played against their hosts, narrowly losing a hard-fought and competitive game 4-2. PO Andy Gillson said,“I took a great free kick to try to get Echo back in the game. I’m just disappointed that the manager kept me on the bench for too long, otherwise I may have been able to salvage the game for the team.”Which isn’t a million mile away from a post-match interview on Match of the Day…When not in Mumbai or playing football, Echo’s been rather busy for the 16 months she’s been deployed from Devonport for, gathering hydrographic data, surveying the waters east of Suez and supporting the wider international naval effort of maritime security operations and anti-piracy work.Echo will continue her high tempo of operations until late summer when she will hand over the survey baton to her sister ship HMS Enterprise, whereupon she’ll return to the UK for an extended period of maintenance and regeneration for future worldwide tasking.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , April 30, 2012; Image: royalnavy View post tag: News by topic HMS Echo Becomes First Royal Navy Vessel in ‘The Gateway of India’ View post tag: Naval Training & Education View post tag: Indiacenter_img View post tag: HMS Back to overview,Home naval-today HMS Echo Becomes First Royal Navy Vessel in ‘The Gateway of India’ View post tag: first View post tag: Navy View post tag: Echo View post tag: the View post tag: becomes Share this articlelast_img read more

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HUNDREDS TURN OUT FOR SWITCHING-ON OF RAMELTON CHRISTMAS LIGHTS

first_imgRamelton sees the Christmas light after official switch-on!Hundreds of people turned up on The Mall in Ramelton tonight for the switching on of the Christmas lights.The large crowd awaits the lights in RameltonThe lights, which are erected on a voluntary basis by the local community, are a hugely popular attraction in Ramelton each year.Yes, it certainly is beginning to feel a lot like Christmas!  HUNDREDS TURN OUT FOR SWITCHING-ON OF RAMELTON CHRISTMAS LIGHTS was last modified: December 8th, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Ramelton Christmas lightslast_img read more

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Support services targeted

first_imgWASHINGTON – California could lose as much as $4.8 billion in collections of delinquent child-support payments under a House-approved measure that slashes federal funds for enforcement, officials said Friday. In Los Angeles County alone, officials estimated the total local loss would be $1 billion over the next decade. The deficit-reduction measure – passed by the House 217-215 in the pre-dawn hours Friday – cuts $4.9 billion from child-support enforcement programs and trims another $50 million from a swath of government programs including agriculture subsidies, food stamps, foster care and student loans. The bill remains in negotiations with the Senate, which has not called for cutting child-support enforcement, but Republicans steering the bill have voiced little support for restoring any funds. Last year, the county collected $505 million for families and paid out more than $370 million, with the rest going to repay federal, state and local governments for welfare and foster care services, Browning said. While officials said they are hopeful the money may yet be restored during Senate negotiations, some lawmakers say the cuts may be well-founded. “When we’re running deficits in the hundreds of billions of dollars annually, I think it’s appropriate to look at programs and see where we can achieve some savings,” said Rep. Howard “Buck” McKeon, R-Santa Clarita. Rep. Gary Miller, R-Brea, said counties should assess any program or enforcement costs on deadbeat parents. “Everybody wants to have the federal government pay for everything. We’re saying, ‘Wait a minute. We need to start spreading the costs,”‘ Miller said. Others, however, have vowed to continue to fight. Rep. Linda Sanchez, D-Lakewood, decried the cuts and said she felt hurt personally by $14.3 billion in cuts to federal student loans. “I still pay off my student loans. … Without that student loan, I never would have been able to go to law school,” Sanchez said. McKeon, who is a leading contender to chair the House Education Committee next year and who has worked to increase student loans, called the cuts small compared with the $75 billion program, and noted that much of the burden is on lenders, not students. The bill, he said, actually increases loans to new students and broadens access to financial aid and overall will help lower the deficit. “Hopefully what it means for California and for taxpayers across the country is that we have a plan to slow the growth of spending to realize savings,” he said. Lisa Friedman, (202) 662-8731 [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals “This will not save money. This will cost money,” said Stan Trom, director of the Ventura County Department of Child Support Services, which collects about $50 million annually. “The families are using the money for the necessities of life. … To the extent that people don’t get child support, they’re driven onto welfare rolls,” he said. “We are the margin that keeps people off aid.” The Child Support Directors Association of California estimated that, over the coming decade, Ventura County would lose $56 million under the bill; San Bernardino County, $106 million; and Los Angeles County, $400 million. The state expects to lose $3.2 billion over that period, which officials said will result in the multibillion-dollar decline in collections. “It’s going to mean a huge reduction in the amount we’re going to be able to collect,” said Philip Browning, director of the Los Angeles County Child Support Services Department. “I do think it would be devastating for the county.” last_img read more

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