Bolivia’s FELCN Combats Drug Traffickers in the Amazon Region

first_imgBolivia’s Special Force in the War on Drugs (FELCN) is intensifying security operations –“fighting organizations of organized crime throughout Bolivia’s Amazon,” in the words of FELCN chief Mario Centellas. Nevertheless, their efforts span the whole of Bolivia, where there were 762 active gangs in 2013 according to the National Public Safety Observatory. Most of those criminal organizations are concentrated in the Departments of La Paz, Santa Cruz, and Cochabamba; some are street gangs, while others are larger and more sophisticated organized crime groups. Consequently, they’ve registered several successful operations in the region in recent months. Even as criminal organizations work across Bolivia’s borders, Bolivia is fighting back by cooperating with other countries in the region. They’ve been busy. From January through October 31, of this year, antinarcotic agents with the FELCN have performed 11,286 operations in the Amazon region and throughout the country. During that time they’ve detained 2,920 people suspected of drug trafficking activities, eradicated 9,457 hectares of coca crops and seized 175 tons of drugs. That’s up from the 118 tons of drugs throughout 2013. Successful anti-drug operations Some of those groups are Colombian. In Bolivia, Colombian drug traffickers can produce a kilo of high-quality cocaine from Peruvian base for less than US$2,000. That same kilo in Buenos Aires or Sao Paulo is worth up to US $8,000. Various Colombian drug trafficking groups – as well as groups from Brazil – operate in remote areas of the Amazon region, where they produce and transport significant quantities of drugs, weapons, and also engage in human trafficking. Among other missions, FELCN members perform daily patrols to locate and destroy clandestine drug labs, in addition to aerial operations and drug seizures. For example, in joint operations, the FELCN and Peruvian security forces seized 16 aircraft from January to mid-November. Meanwhile, Colombian and Brazilian security forces have conducted successful security operations to protect their borders, sometimes using advanced technologies such as aerial surveillance. Nevertheless, their efforts span the whole of Bolivia, where there were 762 active gangs in 2013 according to the National Public Safety Observatory. Most of those criminal organizations are concentrated in the Departments of La Paz, Santa Cruz, and Cochabamba; some are street gangs, while others are larger and more sophisticated organized crime groups. Bolivia’s Special Force in the War on Drugs (FELCN) is intensifying security operations –“fighting organizations of organized crime throughout Bolivia’s Amazon,” in the words of FELCN chief Mario Centellas. By Dialogo November 21, 2014 During that operation they also arrested four suspects: Paraguayan national Wilder David, Brazilian national Joao Carlos L.C.; Peruvian national José V.S.; and Gary R.A., a Bolivian national. Their drug ring was storing the cocaine, which they had brought into Bolivia from Perú, at a ranch; from there, they planned on transporting it to Paraguay, Brazil, and Europe. Before the security operation broke up the scheme, drug gang pilots were transporting cocaine in four to six flights a day, according to La Prensa. For example, in joint operations, the FELCN and Peruvian security forces seized 16 aircraft from January to mid-November. Meanwhile, Colombian and Brazilian security forces have conducted successful security operations to protect their borders, sometimes using advanced technologies such as aerial surveillance. The FELCN and other security forces focus much of their attention on three key areas where organized crime groups transport drugs from Perú into Bolivia: San Martin, Puno, and VRAEM regions. These are areas where drug traffickers operate production centers and process cocaine base paste, which they later refine in the country’s northern regions. For example, the FELCN seized a model C-210 G Cessna aircraft and 102 kilograms of cocaine in the Department of Beni on October 12 . The aircraft was registered in Paraguay. Even as criminal organizations work across Bolivia’s borders, Bolivia is fighting back by cooperating with other countries in the region. Such technologies, while “expensive at the outset, can lead to large savings for the state in the medium term,” said Carlos Mendoza Mora, a security consultant with Strategic Project Consulting, a private firm in Mexico City. He added that focusing the FELCN’s efforts in border regions is an effective strategy, which provides “viability and security” to civilians in those areas. During that operation they also arrested four suspects: Paraguayan national Wilder David, Brazilian national Joao Carlos L.C.; Peruvian national José V.S.; and Gary R.A., a Bolivian national. Their drug ring was storing the cocaine, which they had brought into Bolivia from Perú, at a ranch; from there, they planned on transporting it to Paraguay, Brazil, and Europe. Before the security operation broke up the scheme, drug gang pilots were transporting cocaine in four to six flights a day, according to La Prensa. Consequently, they’ve registered several successful operations in the region in recent months. They’ve been busy. From January through October 31, of this year, antinarcotic agents with the FELCN have performed 11,286 operations in the Amazon region and throughout the country. During that time they’ve detained 2,920 people suspected of drug trafficking activities, eradicated 9,457 hectares of coca crops and seized 175 tons of drugs. That’s up from the 118 tons of drugs throughout 2013. Cooperation and technology The FELCN and other security forces focus much of their attention on three key areas where organized crime groups transport drugs from Perú into Bolivia: San Martin, Puno, and VRAEM regions. These are areas where drug traffickers operate production centers and process cocaine base paste, which they later refine in the country’s northern regions. Cooperation and technology Such technologies, while “expensive at the outset, can lead to large savings for the state in the medium term,” said Carlos Mendoza Mora, a security consultant with Strategic Project Consulting, a private firm in Mexico City. He added that focusing the FELCN’s efforts in border regions is an effective strategy, which provides “viability and security” to civilians in those areas. Some of those groups are Colombian. In Bolivia, Colombian drug traffickers can produce a kilo of high-quality cocaine from Peruvian base for less than US$2,000. That same kilo in Buenos Aires or Sao Paulo is worth up to US $8,000. Various Colombian drug trafficking groups – as well as groups from Brazil – operate in remote areas of the Amazon region, where they produce and transport significant quantities of drugs, weapons, and also engage in human trafficking. Among other missions, FELCN members perform daily patrols to locate and destroy clandestine drug labs, in addition to aerial operations and drug seizures. Successful anti-drug operations For example, the FELCN seized a model C-210 G Cessna aircraft and 102 kilograms of cocaine in the Department of Beni on October 12 . The aircraft was registered in Paraguay. last_img read more

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5 tips From ‘Extreme Chef’ to bring to your own kitchen.

first_img Share Food & DiningLifestyle 5 tips From ‘Extreme Chef’ to bring to your own kitchen. by: – May 27, 2011 Sharing is caring! Share 27 Views   no discussionscenter_img Share Tweet Hold onto your pots and pans, a new cooking show is coming to your TV soon, and it’s going to be extreme — Extreme Chef, to be exact. Premiering June 30 on the Food Network, the new show promises to push chef to their limits though a series of crazy challenges to test their adaptability and artistry … and push everyday cooks like me into a deep depression when looking at the dull dinners we’re cooking on our measly old ranges.But fear not, we don’t have to just watch wistfully from our couches while sneering at our gleaming microwaves, we too can be extreme chefs without traipsing all over the world. Here are five ways you can be your own extreme chef to keep mealtime more interesting and challenge yourself just like they do on TV.1. They will skin bears and rattlesnakes before cooking them, you can learn to cut up a whole chicken. Sure, buying individual pieces is easier, but it’s cheaper to buy a whole chicken usually, and you’ll be challenged to find uses for each of the parts. Buffalo wings, anyone?2. They will cook a meal on a deserted island, you can cook for weeks on end based only on what’s currently in your house. Dig into the back of those cupboards, clean out that freezer, you’ll be amazed at what you can come up with without buying a single extra ingredient.3. They will swim across rivers to get ingredients, you can explore local markets you may have never ventured into before. Check out the Asian market or you local Middle Eastern vendor and explore a whole host of ingredients that exist beyond your local supermarket shelves.4. They will be challenged to cook for a block party in torrential rain, you can use your grill more. Don’t let a little rain, snow, or heat keep you cooking inside. Brave the elements. 5. They promise to cook meals with a car engine as a makeshift stove, you … can feel free to head out to your driveway and try it yourself.Sure you may not win the $10,000 prize (that’s it?), but you will have pushed your own boundaries and hopefully come up with some creative and tasty new cuisine along the way.by The_Stirlast_img read more

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Eagles And Rebels Split MS Soccer Games

first_imgThe JCD Jr. High Soccer team traveled to Southwestern Hanover to face The Rebels.The Rebels won the first game 5-0.In the 2nd game, The Eagles came out strong and won 4-1.Scoring for the eagles where: Annalise Boor, Grace Truesdell and Jordan Meyer (2).  Assist in the game went to Morgan Sutton (2) and Jordan Meyer.The next game for JCD is on September 3 at Shawe Memorial.Courtesy of Eagles Jr. High Soccer Coach Larry Hammond.last_img

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Syracuse football freshmen: Blair, Hofrichter, Fredrick, Cross, Henderson

first_imgSyracuse football freshman move-in day is Sunday, and Scott Shafer welcomes a crop of 26 — including early enrollee Matt Keller — onto the team. Here’s a brief look at the third five of the group.Reminder: Original Class of 2015 commit Brandon Ginnetti will arrive in January as part of the Class of 2016 and Trey Dunkelberger is a junior college transfer, so he won’t be included in the freshman class. All physical measurements are according to Scout.Marquise Blair, safety, Wooster (Ohio) High SchoolBlair is the lone four-star prospect in the class and one of two commits from the state of Ohio. He runs a 4.44-second 40-yard dash and could factor as a backup in a secondary that lost three of its four starters, and one other significant contributor in Ritchy Desir. The 6-foot-3, 185-pounder hasn’t definitely qualified academically, per Syracuse.com, but he’s expected to find out soon if he does.Sterling Hofrichter, kicker, Armwood (Florida) High SchoolAdvertisementThis is placeholder textHofrichter impressed Shafer in person, earning him a scholarship en route to verbally committing last June. He has a versatile leg and is able to punt, kick field goals and take kickoffs. He may be in a battle with incumbent Cole Murphy to do so – and dare he even challenge Riley Dixon?Christopher Fredrick, safety, Cedar Grove (Georgia) High SchoolFredrick stands at 6-foot-2 and 180 pounds, running a 4.5-second 40-yard dash. He too — maybe not on the same level as Blair — will push a young secondary to fill the holes of Brandon Reddish, Darius Kelly and Durell Eskridge. Cornerback Julian Whigham is the only returning starter, and Fredrick could help bolster the second line of that unit. He had 30 total tackles in his senior season for Cedar Grove, per MaxPreps.Tyler Cross, defensive tackle, Northview (Georgia) High SchoolAlong with Giudice and Steven Clark, Cross may have to play a bigger role than he thinks with three graduations and the departures of Williams, Isaiah Johnson and Marcus Coleman. It’s a thin, young unit for Syracuse this season and cross may find himself fighting for time with redshirt freshmen Kayton Samuels and Chris Slayton.Troy Henderson Jr., outside linebacker, St. Edward (Ohio) High SchoolHenderson developed a strong relationship with linebackers coach Clark Lea which led to his commitment. He had this to say to The Daily Orange last summer about what he feels he best brings to the table.“I’m able to get off the ball quick, able to get off blocks quick, make plays in the open field and make open-field tackles,” Henderson said. “I’m a very good tackler.”He’ll join a youthful group that will see three sophomores starting in Marqez Hodge, Zaire Franklin and either Jonathan Thomas or Parris Bennett. Comments Related Stories Syracuse football freshmen: Perkins, Fredericks, Clausman, Conway, ByrneSyracuse football freshmen: Strickland, Giudice, Adams, Duerig, CullenSyracuse football freshmen: Ellison, Dungey, Keller, Clark, EaleySyracuse football freshmen: Sheppard, Carter, Pickard, Whitner, Womack, Taylor Published on July 5, 2015 at 4:11 pm Contact Matt: [email protected] | @matt_schneidmancenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Looking for an edge: Teams trying to turn data into wins

first_imgCarpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil FILE – In this Sept. 30, 2018 file photo, New Orleans Pelicans’ head coach Alvin Gentry calls out to his team during the second half of a preseason NBA basketball game against the Chicago Bulls in Chicago. (AP Photo/Jim Young, File)Data is pored over by coaches and staff of the Orlando Magic on a regular basis. They’ll dissect how far a player runs during practice, how quickly that player accelerates and decelerates, how his performance changes as the workout goes along, biometric measurements like his heartbeat or when his workload is particularly heavy.The charts and graphs are detailed and precise.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ But how it’ll help the Magic win, that’s still an unknown.Wearable technology — chips worn during practice to collect information that analysts churn into reports — has been around the NBA for the past several seasons. It’s not permitted on game nights, and anything specific about processes the 30 teams are using falls into the category of closely guarded secrets. And when it comes to coaches deciding what play to call in the final seconds with a game on the line, it doesn’t seem to have an impact quite yet.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back Chriss“It’s all very beneficial stuff,” Magic coach Steve Clifford said. “But I can only digest X amount of information. And it has to be the right amount of information.”That’s one of the challenges that NBA teams are facing in this information age. Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crowncenter_img “It seems inherently geared to advantage the team,” University of Illinois law professor Michael LeRoy said in comments posted to his blog last year. “When it’s not linked to performance and not actually linked to injury, just correlation … it’s hard to see where that data can be used to the advantage of a player.”The NBA has put together a list of what brands (like Catapult and STATSports ) and types of products that teams can use, much in the same way it approves knee braces and other accessories. Teams aren’t mandated to share the data they’re collecting from the wearables with the league, although that may change once devices are permitted to be used during games.“Data collected through wearable devices has the potential to have a number of applications to improve player health — but it’s not a silver bullet,” said Dr. John DiFiori, the NBA’s medical director. “Information from wearables can add more detail on each player’s loading, which, together with a team’s overall toolkit, can help develop more individualized injury prevention programs, and assist teams in promoting safe return to play following an injury.”There could be benefits to standardizing the data, but that seems a long way off — especially since teams are still figuring out how to best go forward individually. The league and the NBA Players Association are working on finalizing a validation program will be in place to ensure that devices are measuring what the manufacturers say they’re measuring, and that they do so accurately.Atlanta rookie Kevin Huerter said in his short time as a pro, he’s learned a ton about his body that he didn’t even know because of what he’s gleaned off what his team has collected.“At this level, they worry and care so much more about your body,” Huerter said. “The technology monitors how tough practices are and how tough you’re pushing yourself. It’s a longer season, everybody knows that. So I think a lot of it is making sure guys stay healthy and listening when guys are hurting a little bit one day.”It might extend careers, help with injury management, maybe develop ways to avoid injuries.But whether this data will ever be sharpened to the point of helping a team figure out how to overcome a five-point deficit with 28.2 seconds remaining, that’s anyone’s guess.“Where the league is going, you’re looking for every edge,” Clifford said. “But as a coach, what you can’t do is you can’t stop watching the film. The data, talking to people, the numbers, all that, it’s all good information. But to have the clarity I think you need to make the right decisions, you better have watched enough film because that’s where you can see why, why, why it’s happening.” LATEST STORIES Everyone knows analytics can help in countless ways. But the question remains simple: How?“You’ve got to take it and use it as best you can,” said New Orleans coach Alvin Gentry, who said he resisted using some data that he was presented several years ago when he coached in Phoenix — and wound up taking that Suns team to the Western Conference finals. “But at the end of the day, I think the instincts that you have as a coach become just as important, really.”There are some consistencies in what’s being collected. Regardless of what hardware a team is using, everything basically tracks the same things: distance of movement, speed of movement, acceleration and deceleration, workload and heart rate. Teams work on their own, largely without NBA oversight except for some rules laid out in the Collective Bargaining Agreement.It’s already been a boost in how teams monitor a player’s recovery from injury or surgery.But some also have wondered if the data collection is too invasive, or could be used against a player — something that isn’t supposed to happen under league rule.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Biles bothered by new USA Gymnastics CEO’s anti-Nike tweet Phivolcs: Slim probability of Taal Volcano caldera eruption Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title View commentslast_img read more

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