West Hempstead Man Gets Probation for Dogfighting

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A West Hempstead was sentenced Tuesday to probation, community service and will not be allowed to own any pets for five years after he admitted to participating in dogfighting.Hector Hernandez had pleaded guilty in August at Nassau County court to animal cruelty and animal fighting.Prosecutors said the 27-year-old man had dogfighting equipment—including chains, a treadmill and dog tether—on his property, where investigators acting on a tip found numerous pit-bull dogs caged in a shed, multiple chickens and one rabbit in January.Two of the dogs, Roja and Nana, had fresh bite marks on their front sides while the other six dogs were found in poor living conditions, authorities said.Judge Sharon Gianelli also sentenced Hernandez to $1,200 in fines and ordered Hernandez to sign a spot-check agreement to ensure compliance with the pet ownership ban.Hernandez will additionally be required to sign up for county’s new Animal Crimes Registry, which shelters and pet stores are required to check before allowing an applicant to adopt a pet.last_img read more

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Functional Family Therapy may not be effective in tackling behavioral problems in

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 11 2018A long-established treatment used around the world to help troubled young people and their families tackle behavioral problems may not be as effective as its practitioners claim – a new study reveals.Functional Family Therapy (FFT) is a short-term, evidence-based intervention provided at over 270 sites worldwide – mostly within the US, but also in Belgium, Ireland, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden and the UK.Researchers at the University of Birmingham recommend that greater examination of FFT is needed, after evaluating 31 existing reviews of research on the treatment’s effectiveness in treating young people, aged 10 to 18.They found that the quality of evidence in reviews was mixed and adversely affected by small sample sizes, no critical appraisal methods and a failure to examine evidence for risk of bias.Paul Montgomery, Professor of Social Intervention in the University of Birmingham’s School of Social Policy, said: “Our overview of FFT illuminates some real areas of concern around this treatment. It appears that in nearly 40 years of existence, there remain a number of unanswered questions about the effectiveness and implementation of FFT.Related StoriesOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchSchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchAXT enhances cellular research product portfolio with solutions from StemBioSys”FFT is intensive and costly. It may not be advisable to continue using the therapy without re-examining and testing its effects. Many reviews currently available are written by people developing and delivering FFT, demonstrating the need for independent and robust trials.”The study, published in Research on Social Work Practice, reveals that median rates of reoffending with FFT were 28 per cent; as opposed to 57 per cent for usual care. Impact on substance abuse was modest and reducing rates of out-of-home placements was not reported, despite being considered a main outcome of FFT.Juvenile delinquency represents a major cost in many countries, with the US spending over $5.7 billion annually on incarcerating minors. In the UK, over 42 per cent of minors typically re-offend, up from ten years ago.Family and youth dysfunction may lead to higher rates of abandonment, higher rates of alcohol and substance use, untreated mental health issues and other negative behaviors. These issues contribute to behavioral disorders resulting in higher likelihood of school drop-out, imprisonment, unemployment and anti-social activities.FFT is designed to treat the behaviors and acting-out activities that take a toll on youth, families and communities. Additionally, FFT may be used as a re-entry programme for young people being released from institutional settings or at risk for removal from the home.​Source: https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/last_img read more

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