SWAG inaugurates Bono branches, charges sports media to join association

first_img“SWAG should do more than what journalists are currently doing. I am surprised most sports journalists are not members of SWAG because all along I thought you’re an automatic member of SWAG once you become a sports journalist.  “It will help us all to have confidence and deal with SWAG once we know they are under one umbrella, “said Appiah, in a solidarity message.SWAG in making the association vibrant nationwide and mobilise practicing sports journalists under its umbrella, the Association set up the Regional Mobilisation Committee to work on ensuring the sports media are effectively organised under SWAG.SWAG is noted for honouring sports excellence annually through the annual SWAG Awards (the nation’s premier and longest-running national awards) and the prestigious SWAG Cup which is often contested among the top football clubs in Ghana annually. The President of the Sports Writers’ Association of Ghana (SWAG), Mr Kwabena Yeboah has encouraged the sports media in Ghana to endeavour to join the association because of the enormous benefits they stand to gain professionally by signing up to become members of the country’s only professional association of practising sports journalists.Kwabena Yeboah made the remarks last Saturday at the inauguration of the Bono regional branch of SWAG at the conference hall of the Sunyani Technical University.The programme brought together practising sports journalists in the Bono, Bono East, Ahafo regions, and some Executive Council members of SWAG.It was also graced by Black Stars coach, James Kwasi Appiah, and Ghana and Asante Kotoko legend, Samuel Opoku Nti, among other dignitaries.The Bono regional branch is the third regional body of SWAG after the Ashanti and Volta regional branches. It under the interim leadership of Maxwell Owusu Antwi (chairman) Dickson Kwabena Kyere(vice-chairman), Evelyn Nsiah Asare(secretary), Precious Sermevor(Ass secretary), Evans Kwaku Oppong ( PRO), Alhaji Yahaya(Treasurer), Atta Twum Barima(Organiser), Asoma Reagan (Welfare), Ntow Gyan(Executive member), Collins Yaw Suglo(Executive member) and Albert Kofi Diawuo(Executive member) on a two-year mandate after which the branch will go to the polls to elect new executives.Inaugurating the branch, Mr Yeboah said SWAG, as part of its membership drive to bring more professionalism into sports journalism, will inaugurate the Eastern, Western, Northern, Upper East and other branches soon, so that practising sports journalists across the country would benefit from being members of the parent body and by extension the world body, the International Sports Press Association (AIPS). Mr Yeboah said he believed sports journalism had made tremendous strides over the year but believed that a lot more needed to be done by sports journalism through continuous training, mentoring and specialisation which are among the benefits available to members of SWAG.“I keep hearing the level of sports journalism has deteriorated; I totally disagree. Sports journalism is more vibrant today than previous times,” the SWAG president said.The regional sports director of the National Sports Authority, Mr. Yakubu Nasiru, admonished ports journalist to report on other sporting disciplines and also specialise in the coverage of particular sports instead of being biased towards football to the detriment of other disciplines.Former CEO of Asante Kotoko, Samuel Opoku Nti, advised sports journalist to refrain from insults, unnecessary criticism and also the tendency to run down the sports personalities and institutions through their commentaries.Coach Kwasi Appiah said sports journalists play a vital role in the development of sports and shaping society positively, hence he expected more from SWAG and its members.last_img read more

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The crisis according to Varoufakis

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram It was standing-room only at the Lonsdale Street headquarters of the Greek Orthodox Community of Melbourne and Victoria on Tuesday, as political economist Yanis Varoufakis shared his thoughts on the Greek crisis, why no such thing existed, and by the way – how to escape it. The lecture – based upon Varoufakis’ contention that the eurozone is in its final death-throes amidst a wider global economic conflagration – was fittingly the last event to be presented at GOCMV’s current headquarters, before it too succumbs to the bulldozers. For those who have followed his many utterances as a TV news analyst and online in recent years, it was vintage Varoufakis – eloquent, strident claims of the imminent destruction of the eurozone, within an overarching narrative of the drastic shortcomings of globalised capitalism. Greece is a sideshow – a victim of disreputable bankers propped up by the EU which for Varoufakis is a fatally flawed institution, without the internal systems – and more importantly without the political will – for member states with surpluses to support other states who have deficits. To begin, he asked his audience to reflect on whether the current economic and social problems in Greece should be described as a crisis at all. He pointed to the winter of 1941-1942, when over a hundred thousand Greeks died of starvation, and the 1974 invasion of Cyprus, as crises worthy of the name. “Greece is experiencing an existentialist catastrophe” he said. “It would be just as silly to talk about the Greek crisis today, as it would be to speak of ‘the Tasmanian crisis’ in the 1930s. “The Greek people today are part of a general crisis, of which Greece is but an interesting, sad and tragic part,” said Varoufakis. He spoke with few notes, repeating an agenda he has been espousing for some time: how the Greek, eurozone and global economic crises should be viewed as a kind of wooden Russian doll – each the offspring of the other. “But we Greeks were one million percent responsible for Greece being the first domino to fall,” said the former advisor to PASOK, admitting that a large chunk of responsibility for the current situation lay with Greece’s political elites over decades. Varoufakis, who worked for George Papandreou between 2004 and 2006, said the question was not whether Greece would or should leave the euro, but rather, when would Germany make up its mind, if Germany itself wishes to remain in the euro? The EU’s demand for austerity measures to be fulfilled – in order for Greece to continue to receive bailout funds – was torture, a case of “waterboarding” he said. “Germany knows the austerity measures will not work, but it applies them because it is making its own mind up about whether it wants to remain in the euro. “I say to Germany, make it up,” said Varoufakis to widespread applause. Then it was over to Q and A’s. The audience was largely warm and referential to the former University of Sydney lecturer, with only one or two dissenting voices, suggesting that the globe-trotting economist might be prone to “a selectivity of facts”. According to his critics, Varoufakis’ “modest proposals” as he refers to them, are based on his beliefs which some say are a mix of utopian socialism and a cautious neo-Keynesianism. His most vocal detractors accuse him of being light on concrete suggestions for development, and too often when talking about Greece, deliberately choosing to avoid the immense dysfunctionality of its economy and the reasons for it. He did offer three suggestions for escaping the crisis and saving the eurozone. “You don’t need federation, and you don’t need to torture people [with austerity],” said Varoufakis defiantly. “What you do need to do is get rid of the national banking systems, make the European Central Bank take part of the debt of member states – debts which can’t ever be serviced – and make this debt disappear, and an investment policy is needed to resuscitate the [European] economy.” As audience members filed down the dimly-lit stairs of the GOCMV building (the lift had decided not to function properly on the last, busiest night of its existence), each reflected on Varoufakis’ analysis and wish-list for action, hoping that the GOCMV building and Greece, will rise from their respective ashes, phoenix-like in the not too distant future. If only the reconstruction of a nation’s economy was as simple as laying bricks and mortar.last_img read more

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