Drew Remenda on the Sharks: Bad call, bad play

first_imgA former San Jose Sharks coach once said: “ You can’t win a game in the first, but you can sure lose it.”And yes, I can already hear you yelling at me. ”Remenda, you idiot, the Sharks came back to tie it!”Pump your brakes right there.Yes, the Sharks rallied to produce a Russell Crowe Gladiator “Are-you-not-entertained” first period comeback. But since when is the score an exact indicator of how a team is playing? The tone of the game had been set. Detail. Execution. Puck …last_img read more

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Eugenics in Space

first_imgTo “keep evolution on a favorable track,” spacefaring humans may want to cull bad genes, a futurist says.Enter chief speculator, Cameron Smith of Portland State University, whose “day job” is teaching evolution.  In Elizabeth Howell’s post on Live Science, “Will Humans Keep Evolving on Ultra-Long Space Voyages?“, Smith was given free rein to fantasize about starship populations transporting human wretchedness across the light-years, to pollute other worlds some distant day.  One of the factors that he thinks can’t be overlooked is evolution.  A teacher of evolution at the university, Smith feels “evolution will continue on starships despite the best attempts to limit it.”“I believe that new pressure, breathing-gas compositions, gravity and radiation environments will act on the early stages of embryo and fetus development; this will be natural selection of new selective agents on the genome,” Smith told SPACE.com in an email after stating his views in a recent Scientific American podcast.“Precisely what new characteristics will be selected for or against, and spread or be deleted from the population, is very hard to predict, however.”It might seem odd that a teacher of evolution equates natural selection with inheritance of acquired characteristics (Lamarckism) in the embryo, but Howell didn’t stop him right there.  Instead, she let him launch into unfettered prediction about what is very hard to predict, and to advise politicians he will never see about how to “keep evolution on a favorable track” —To keep evolution on a favorable track, the early space colonists should be screened as much as possible for genetic problems, Smith said.His advice primarily wobbled around the “founder effect” of a new population and the minimum population size to avert inbreeding, though he correctly noted that the single-gene disease notion is “melting away” under new discoveries of polygenic disease and epigenetics.  Interfering with evolution raises ominous thoughts about eugenics, so he wanted to make it clear he is not one of “them” —He stressed that he doesn’t mean breeding a “super-race” of humans, which would open moral issues.But if evolution is as evolution does, and if evolution brought humans to existence, what are morals?  Where did they evolve from?  Wouldn’t the rigors of space require a super-race of space travelers, with evolutionary biologists advising tyrannical captains and an ample supply of obedient peasants to do the work?  It’s unclear why Smith preferred the happy, cooperative Star Trek crew, when evolution produces anything that gets the job done.  Maybe that’s just his personal preference.If Smith is feeling some sense of moral obligation, it might be described as a mutation interfering with the inexorable random track of evolution.  If natural selection produces a batch of obese slackers on the ship, as depicted in the Disney movie Wall-E (mentioned by Howell as some kind of bad outcome), who’s he to complain?  Why would anyone offer “best attempts to limit it”?  Evolve or perish; evolve and perish; nobody cares.Question: what do you get when you subject embryos to “new pressure, breathing-gas compositions, gravity and radiation environments”?  You can find out with experiments on fruit flies in the space station.  Do you get “new selective agents” in the genome?  No; you get dead embryos.  But even for any that survive, they will not pass on their genes unless the selection occurs in the gametes.  A mutation in the embryo is too late; its phenotype is an evolutionary dead end.  Here we see a professor of evolution presenting Lamarckism as an example of how Darwinian evolution works.  Astonishing.No, we’re not advocating a super race, Smith says.  We just want to keep the unfit from breeding.  Sound familiar?Sometimes you just have to stand back and let the illogic of these people implode.  If it were that simple, everyone would see it, but the fact that Space.com and Live Science still put this illogic out there means we have to keep pointing it out until they fear the inevitable backlash from informed citizens.  Cameron Smith is defeating his own premise by desiring to guide evolution on moral grounds.  The key point of Darwinian evolution is that it is unguided.  If Smith wants to guide it to keep evolution on a “favorable” track, he’s promoting artificial selection – a form of intelligent design – on human beings, which is eugenics.  But the spectre of its dark past scares him, so he quickly backpedals, stressing that he doesn’t mean breeding a super-race, “which would open moral issues.”  Whose moral issues?  His?If Smith is feeling a moral obligation to prevent the horrors of breeding a super race, that’s more than a personal preference.  That’s his conscience speaking.  If he were a consistent evolutionist, he would dismiss his moral feelings as irrelevant fluff.  But he can’t.  Deep down, he wants to see love, fairness, beauty and health continue on in a population maintaining genuine human nature.  He cannot escape the image his Creator implanted in him. 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The Leadership Playbook: What I Want in a Leader

first_imgIf I were hiring a leader, here is what I would want in the person I was hiring.A Compelling, Inspiring Purpose and Vision: If you are going to lead, you are going to have to create followers. So, where are you taking us? Why should we want to go there, and more still, why should I want to go there? A leader provides a clear, compelling vision that inspires others to act. Without that vision, you aren’t a leader; you’re an administrator.A Burning Desire to Win: For my money, I want a leader who loves a good fight. I want someone with a fire in their belly and an insatiable desire to win. A leader knows that her organization is competing, maybe against direct competitors, maybe for attention, maybe for donations. A leader can’t be someone who is okay with the losing; they have to hate losing, learn from it, and go back and compete again.An Unshakeable Optimism: No one wants to follow a pessimist. No one wants a leader who believes all is lost. That isn’t something a leader can be. A leader can’t be the person who is full of fear and loathing when it comes to the future. Optimism is what allows you to act. A leader recognizes negatives as a burning platform and makes the decisions to move the organization she leads into a better future.Impatience and a Sense of Urgency: Leaders know they are playing against a clock. They never believe they have enough time. A number of US Presidents (maybe all of them) have had calendars with the days they have remaining. They know that whatever they are going to get done has to be done now—if not sooner. They have to be impatient for results and lead their organization with a sense of urgency.An Extraordinary Emotional Intelligence: There are countless stories about great leaders who were nasty, foul, and completely lacking in emotional intelligence. They are exceptional, not so much as leaders, but in that they are the exception. Great leaders have very high emotional intelligence. They can work a room. They rely on their powers of persuasion and not their formal authority because they know persuasion is more effective. A leader is in the “people business,” and that means they need an extraordinary emotional intelligence.A Desire to Help Others Grow: A poor leader from a dominator hierarchy looks at their people as a means to an end. A great leader looks at their people as the end. They focus a good part of their time and attention on helping the people they lead grow and develop. A leader builds future leaders. They pull people up. They nurture people and teach others to do the same. A great leader knows that their legacy is how the organization performs after they are gone.last_img read more

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Sprinter Hima Das secures first division in Assam class XII exam

first_imgSprinter Hima Das, secured first division in the Arts and Humanities stream of the exams conducted by the Assam Higher Secondary Education Council. She secured a total of 349 marks out of 500 with letter marks (80 or above) in Assamese language. The 19-year-old had appeared for the Class XII exam in February after a year’s gap, coming straight from her athletics training in Turkey. She gave her exam at the Dhing College in her hometown Dhing, about 120 km from Guwahati.She chose to shuttle between the exam centre and the Sports Authority of India (SAI) hostel in Guwahati, instead of staying at home, to train whenever she managed time off from studies.”We are happy with her academic performance. It is now time for her to give her best on the athletic track, which she was destined to pursue,” said her father, Ranjit Das.Hima’s academic feat followed a disappointment at the 23rd Asian Athletics Championship at Doha where she crashed out due to an injury.A total of 2,42,843 candidates had appeared for the Class XII exams this year – 1,86,187 in Arts, 37,455 in Science and 18,291 in Commerce stream. The results for the 2019 exams announced on Saturday showed a pass percentage of 75.14%, 87.59% and 86.59% in Arts, Commerce and Science streams respectively.last_img read more

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13 days agoSolskjaer hands Man Utd board six man shopping list

first_imgSolskjaer hands Man Utd board six man shopping listby Paul Vegas13 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United boss Ole Gunnar Solskjaer have handed the board a six man shopping list.The Daily Mail says so far, they have relied on the eyes and ears of Solskjaer, Mike Phelan, veteran scout Jim Lawlor and his recruitment staff.They have given transfer chiefs Ed Woodward and Matt Judge the names of half-a-dozen targets but United would prefer to wait until the summer to make big signings having had their fingers burned on Alexis Sanchez in the January 2018 transfer window.On that occasion, the club backed Jose Mourinho by giving Sanchez record wages to gazzump Manchester City but the move turned into a disaster with the Chilean scoring just five goals for his £42million salary before joining Inter Milan on loan.They are also reluctant to rip up their plans and change targets in January as a knee-jerk reaction to them becoming available. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Tears sorrow as families speak of missing and murdered Indigenous women

first_imgWINNIPEG – Family members of missing and murdered Indigenous women sobbed, fought back tears and expressed anger Monday as they recounted what happened to their loved ones.They also recalled running up against what they said was indifference from police and people in general.“What was she to society — nothing?” Isabel Daniels asked the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women about her cousin, Nicole Daniels, who was found frozen to death in 2009.“Like the 1,200 other aboriginal women that are murdered and missing?”Nicole was 16 when she was found face down, with her clothes partially removed, behind a Winnipeg auto body shop on the morning of April 1, 2009. The night before, her family said the teen had gone out with an older man she had met on a telephone chat line.An autopsy found a high level of alcohol in her system and the police ruled out foul play. They attributed the removed clothing to paradoxical undressing — a misplaced feeling of warmth that can occur when people suffer from severe hypothermia.Her family told the inquiry hearing in Winnipeg they have no doubt Nicole Daniels was murdered.“She had bruises on her arms that we saw when she was in her casket, and she didn’t have those bruises before. She had bruises on her legs,” Nicole’s aunt, Joan Winning, told the hearing.Similar frustration came from Lorna Sinclair, whose sister, Myrna Letandre, was murdered in 2006. Letandre’s killer, Traigo Andretti, was her boyfriend and was only charged after Letandre’s remains were found in 2013 in a Winnipeg rooming house.Andretti was questioned at the time of Letandre’s disappearance but not charged — something that Sinclair said was wrong.“More needs to be done when our people go missing, when our women go missing. You have to investigate the people they were with,” she said.“On three different occasions, I say to you all, I went to that house … and Traigo had said to us that he wouldn’t let us in. He said, ‘No, she’s not here. She went to B.C., Calgary. I don’t know where she is.’”Andretti pleaded guilty in 2015 to second-degree murder. He had recently been given a life sentence for the murder of another Manitoba Indigenous woman, Jennifer McPherson, in 2013.McPherson’s murder was not the first for her family. Her mother, Betty Rourke, also lost a sister to violence in 1980. She fought back tears as she recalled memories of her sister as a young child.Many family members told the hearing the violence has affected them. Some are scared to go out alone. Some are mistrustful of men. Some are haunted by the feeling they might have done something to keep their loved ones safe.Monday’s hearing was the first of four days scheduled for Winnipeg, following earlier hearings in Smithers, B.C., and Whitehorse.The inquiry has faced complaints from some families about poor communication and delays. One commissioner and some staff members have resigned.Kevin Hart, a regional vice-chief with the Assembly of First Nations, alluded to the controversy in his opening remarks.“We know it hasn’t been an easy job for you … and I ask you from the bottom of my heart: please help the families and the survivors and the two-spirited because they need you more than ever right now.”Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version misspelled Joan Winning’s first name.last_img read more

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Around 82 unlicensed arms and 2113 cartridges seized

first_imgNEW DELHI: Around 82 unlicensed arms and 2,113 cartridges along with 16,495 litres of illicit liquor have been seized in the national capital since March 10 when the model code of conduct for the LokSabha polls came into force, Delhi’s Chief Electoral Officer Ranbir Singh Monday said. Singh said 75 FIRs have also been registered under the Arms Act and 93 persons have been arrested. He said 235 FIRs have been registered under Excise Act while 242 people have been also been arrested for Excise Act violation. “Around 16,495 litres of illicit liquor has been seized besides 94 kg narcotics. As many as 13,001 people have been booked under CRPC and Delhi police act violation. Six cases have been registered in connection with the misuse of car under various categories like election purposes, gratification or voters among others,” Singh told reporters. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murderAs the CEO claims that till now, around 90,937 hoardings, banners and posters have been removed all over Delhi. Out of which 30,533 have been removed from New Delhi Municipal Council 3,141 from East Delhi Municipal Corporation, 41,131 from South Delhi Corporations, 13,721 from North Delhi Municipla Corporation and 2,411 from Delhi Cantonment Board respectively. Around two lakh people have been added to the electoral roll in Delhi in the last two months, taking the total number of eligible voters to 1.39 crore at present which includes 77,05,537 men, 62,82,366 women and 665 third gender voters, he added. Also Read – Two brothers held for snatchingsIt also includes 1,81,756 voters between the age-group of 18-19, he said. Singh pointed out that there has been an increase of 90,000 to one lakh voters after model code of conduct came into force. The general elections will begin on April 11 and will be held over seven phases, followed by counting of votes on May 23. The elections in Delhi are due on May 12. Polling stations will be established at 2,696 locations, he said, adding 13,816 polling stations would be set up, with a model polling station in each Assembly constituency. There would 425 critical polling stations, as per current assessment, officials said. Delhi has seven Lok Sabha seats and 70 Assembly constituencies.last_img read more

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Congress holds voter outreach programmes in Delhi

first_imgNew Delhi: With less than two weeks left before the national capital goes to the polls, Congress candidates on Sunday held voter outreach programmes in their constituencies. Former Union Minister and Congress leader Ajay Maken, contesting from the New Delhi Lok Sabha constituency, started his campaign from Panchsheel in south Delhi where he interacted with people at a park while on his morning walk. He then visited Greater Kailash 1 and met the residents and later kicked off a ‘padyatra’ from Balmiki Basti, covering areas like Gandhi Sadan and Andh Mahavidyalaya. Also Read – CM urges Delhiites to help accident victims Boxer-turned-politician Vijender Singh, fielded by the Congress from south Delhi Lok Sabha seat, began the day by offering prayers at the Dada Devi temple in Bijwasan area. He then visited the Dada Dev boxing Academy in Palam village. Singh is pitted in a triangular contest against Bharatiya Janata Party candidate and sitting Lok Sabha member Ramesh Bidhuri and Aam Aadmi Party’s Raghav Chadha. Arvinder Singh Lovely, who is pitted against AAP’s Atishi and BJP’s candidate Gautam Gambhir from east Delhi seat, started his ‘padyatra’ from Bhairav temple at Janta camp. Congress’ J.P. Agarwal also took part in several voter outreach programme in Chandni Chowk constituency. Elections in the national capital are to be held on May 12. All seven Lok Sabha in Delhi were won by the BJP in 2014 when the Congress finished second in six seats and third in one seat.last_img read more

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Egypts political rivals in psychological warfare

first_imgCAIRO  –“Each of the two camps seeks to achieve quick victories and control the volatile political scene,” Ghobashi said.With the trial of Egypt’s ousted president Mohamed Morsi few hours away, the Egyptian army and the Muslim Brotherhood continued their psychological warfare to control the political narrative in this volatile country.“Egypt has been in the grip of a psychological warfare since Morsi’s ouster, but this warfare has intensified in the past few days,” Mukhtar Mohamed Ghobashi, the deputy head of the local think-tank Arab Center for Political and Strategic Studies, told Anadolu Agency.“Each of the two camps seeks to achieve quick victories and control the volatile political scene,” he added. Morsi’s is due to stand trial on Monday on charges of inciting the killing of peaceful demonstrators outside the presidential palace in December.It will be his first public appearance since his ouster by the powerful military on July 3.Ghobashi said both parties have their own problems.The army and its supporters, on one hand, are trying to present Egyptians with a convincing alternative to the Muslim Brotherhood whose year in power spawned public resentment towards the group.But they have been unable to do that because of the difficult economic problems that continue to trouble the country.The pro-Morsi National Alliance for the Defense of Legitimacy, on the other hand, has set the bar high with their demand for the reinstatement of Morsi, Ghobashi added.“This is difficult to achieve given the current political conditions in Egypt,” he asserted.“This, both camps have resorted to psychological warfare to make quick gains and control the political narrative” before Egyptians head to polling stations to vote on the constitution and later elected a new parliament and president, Ghobashi said.He cited Interior Minister Mohamed Ibrahim’s recent remarks that the Muslim Brotherhood had almost lost its ability to mobilize protesters.The minister also sounded confident about his ministry’s ability to secure Morsi’s trial, citing their recent success in arresting deputy chairman of the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party (FJP) Essam al-Erian.“It will be a normal day,” Ibrahim argued.-SteadfastnessThe National Alliance for the Defense of Legitimacy, however, has vowed to stage unprecedented rallies on Morsi’s trial day.“The coup leaders are up for a week of mass demonstration,” Ali Khafagi, the FJP Giza youth leader, told Anadolu Agency.“We will show the world that we have a cause and that we are not backing down,” he added.“Our continuing protests far exceed their abilities and that is why they have resorted to imposing emergencies and imposing a curfew,” Khafagi suggested.Experts say despite the heavy-handed crackdown on pro-Morsi protests, which saw hundreds of supporters killed and detained, the pace of demonstrations has not slowed down, wearing out security forces and affecting the national economy negatively.The alliance, Morsi’s main support block, has urged supporters to gather outside the courthouse where Morsi would be tried.It also urged democracy advocates to rally outside Egyptian embassies and consulates around the world.Deputy Chairman of the Islamic Party Magdy Salem, also a leader of the Alliance, has reiterated their determination to defeat the “military coup” against Morsi.He said the army-installed administration uses all legal and illegal tactics to break the will of Morsi’s supporters.“But these practices only make us stronger,” Salem told Anadolu Agency.By Hagar al-Desoukilast_img read more

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Ohio State baseball drops final two games of Snowbird Classic

OSU junior left-hander Tanner Tully (16) delivers a pitch against Coastal Carolina on Feb. 27. OSU won 6-4.Credit: Courtesy of OSUThe trip to Port Charlotte, Florida, ended up being a bummer for the Buckeyes after a promising start, as the Ohio State Baseball team dropped back-to-back games for the first time this season.OSU fell to the Illinois State Redbirds 5-4 on Saturday and the Boston College Eagles 6-2 on Sunday, dropping its record to 6-4-1. The losses came after the Scarlet and Gray started the weekend’s action on the right foot, defeating Seton Hall 9-3 behind another offensive explosion from redshirt junior right fielder Jacob Bosiokovic.  Dropping a close one to the RedbirdsOSU opened Saturday’s game against Illinois State with one of its top pitchers, redshirt sophomore Adam Niemeyer, on the hill. Niemeyer, however, got off to a shaky start, allowing three runs in the first two innings. The righty would get back to his normal self over the rest of his six innings of work, but the 3-0 hole the Buckeyes fell into would prove to be tough to climb out of. The Buckeyes battled back, tying the game in the bottom of the fifth inning behind junior catcher Jalen Washington’s double down the right-field line to score junior left fielder Ronnie Dawson. OSU fell behind again in the seventh, but the deficit was quickly erased by junior center fielder Troy Montgomery’s solo home run to tie the game at 4-4. The homer was Montgomery’s third of the season, which is second most on the team. But the Redbirds would not be denied their first win of the Snowbird Classic, as OSU contributed to its own demise allowing the game-winning run in the top of the ninth on a fielding error by senior second baseman Nick Sergakis. OSU’s co-captain also had his season-long nine-game hitting streak snapped following an 0-for-4 day at the plate. On the other hand, Washington, OSU’s other co-captain, had a career-best day at the plate, going 4-for-4 with two RBIs in the loss. Niemeyer received a no-decision in the game and freshman pitcher Ryan Feltner (0-1) was tagged with the loss for his 2.2 innings of work. Redshirt junior Jack Landwehr (1-1) picked up the win for Illinois State, which improved to 3-6. Dominated by Boston CollegeIn the final game of the three-game trip to the Sunshine State, the Buckeyes’ typically powerful offense was outmatched by Eagles senior starter Jesse Adams and the Boston College pitching staff. OSU’s bats were silenced, only mustering two hits all game against the Eagles and providing little run support for senior starter John Havird.Boston College’s offense was led by junior center fielder Michael Strem, who knocked in the Eagles’ first run as part of his 2-for-4, two-RBI day. Senior infielder Jake Palomaki provided the insurance runs for the Eagles with his sixth-inning double that plated two. The win moved Boston College’s record to 9-1 as Adams (2-0) picked up the win for his six innings of scoreless baseball. The Buckeyes fell to 6-4-1, and Havird was hit with his first loss and decision of the year. OSU now is set to return to Columbus to prepare for its four-game series with UNLV in Las Vegas starting on Friday and ending four days later on March 15. After that, the Buckeyes will gear up for their home-opening series against Hofstra from March 18 to 20. read more

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