Festival At The Farm Organizer James Macdonald On Creating A Lasting Legacy In A Truly Special Location

first_imgThe second annual Festival at the Farm is once again set to take place on Prowse Farm in Canton, MA on September 16th and 17th, boasting a lineup that features an eclectic mix of in-demand artists like Lettuce, The Wood Brothers, Lee Fields & The Expressions, Martin Sexton, The Marcus King Band, Brett Dennen, Ryan Montbleau, Kat Wright, and many more. The event also has focused on curating a local, homegrown feel in a family-friendly environment, enlisting local businesses, farmers, and food and craft beer vendors to get involved.As the event continues to draw closer, we were able to chat with event organizer and producer James Macdonald of Six Chair Productions about Festival at the Farm, the past endeavors at Prowse Farm that led to this festival incarnation, and how he has made it his mission to work with the local community to create a festival that has the neighborhood vibe while also appealing to an larger audience.Live For Live Music: Have any of the artists on this year’s bill have played the festival before?James Macdonald: Yes, in fact we have a handful of artists who have played at Prowse Farm going back to the days when I was the Festival Director for the Life Is Good Festival. Artists making a return trip to the farm are Martin Sexton, the Wood Brothers, Brett Dennen, Ryan Montbleau, Kat Wright, Dwight and Nicole, Session Americana and Josh and the Jamtones doing the kids’ thing. Between Life Is Good Festival and last year’s Festival at the Farm, we’ve created a nice little family bond and the artists really seem to enjoy the location and vibe.L4LM: Can you tell us a little about the history of Festival at the Farm?JM: The festival began last summer, but I have been producing events at the site going back to 2010. As the festival director of the Life is Good Festival (2010-2013), I worked to create a special event for the Boston-area at this really special location. Fast forward to 2016, the Life is Good Festival was no longer…but I felt the site was just too beautiful and convenient to not continue producing a similarly-minded music festival. So in an effort to continue bringing people back to the Farm for live music, I created Festival at the Farm. Second time’s a charm?…L4LM: It seems organizers, artists, and fans alike have developed a connection to this venue. How was the Prowse Farm location originally chosen?JM: There are very few places in the Boston area that are as convenient and beautiful in direct proximity to the city. We’re less than 20 minutes away and we found the site in 2009 in an effort to expand the Life is Good Festival. Six festivals at the farm later…we really feel like we have a beautiful home in an amazing place to see music. There’s a 685 foot cliff directly behind the stages and a beautiful green lawn. There’s just something magical about seeing music in a place that inspires you.L4LM: This year boasts a particularly solid lineup of acts from across the musical spectrum. Which sets are you most excited to see?JM: As the event’s producer I feel a special sense of excitement about all of the acts, but I’m especially looking forward to my friends Ryan Montbleau and Kat Wright. I’m also proud of the fact that we can represent the Boston music scene so well with so many bands from the area. For me, it’s just about seeing these bands discover this beautiful location and vibe. And, of course, there’s a lot of fun seeing the little kids rock out to Josh and The Jamtones.L4LM: Outside of the music, the fest features some really great local food and craft beer options. How important is it to work with the local community in building a successful event?JM: This event is really all about community. It’s independently owned, in fact it’s sort of a “start-up” story in and of itself. So the local farmers and restaurants on site share a kinship what we are trying to do – we have all brought great ideas out to the community and I am so proud to partner with local businesses that believe in their own mission.L4LM: Tell us a little about the vendors and sponsors Festival at the Farm works with.JM: The festival wouldn’t be possible without our friends at Pete and Gerry’s Organic Eggs. People thought it was a little crazy when I told them that we had developed such a great partnership. Usually music festivals focus heavily on a different type of partner. Pete and Gerry’s are an incredible business, supporting local farmers throughout New England, standing up for organic and humane farming practices. I truly am inspired by the things they have done and the things they believe in. Yes, I am gushing about an egg company, but they are the type of business this world needs.L4LM: Not every music festival is entirely family friendly. To what extent did creating an environment for families with children factor into your overall concept and goals for Festival at the Farm?JM: Music festivals just get lumped into this idea that it’s all about sex, drugs and rock ‘n’ roll …or that they are the exclusive domain of teenagers and twenty-somethings. But it’s important to me that my own daughter gets to experience the joy and camaraderie a music festival delivers. I think it’s important to other people, too. Those are our people and we want them to join us. Going back to my life in the good ol’ festival days, I realized that there’s just absolutely nothing that will bring a smile to your face quicker than a five-year-old rocking out at a music festival. So, I just wanted to create a space where mom and dad could maybe have a beer and catch one of their favorite bands while the little ones go bananas and have fun in their own way. Music festivals are for everybody and I enjoy working hard to bring that concept to life.L4LM: There is something to be said about the natural beauty of New England in the Fall. Was the choice to put on an event in early autumn something that was decided on from the start?JM: It’s all about the weather. You just can’t beat New England in the late summer/early fall. Plus, I’m too busy going to all the other amazing summertime New England music to throw my own event [laughs].L4LM: Thanks so much for your time, James. Best of luck this year!Enter to win a free pair of tickets to the upcoming Festival at the Farm below:Single-day tickets are $45, with two-days going for $75. Kids under 5 are free, while tickets for children 6-12 are $15 (single-day) and $20 (two-day). There is a special VIP option that includes a special dinner served by Commonwealth Cambridge chef/owner Nookie Postal. Tickets for Festival at the Farm are currently on-sale and can be purchased here. For additional information and event updates, join the Facebook Event page.If you are traveling from the Boston area, leave your keys at home! The festival has teamed up with Skedaddle to provide an easy group transportation option to the festival. Buses leave from South Street in Boston, and back. Snag your seat on a route! Use promo code FARM10 for $10 off your seat! Purchase a spot on the bus here!Festival At The Farm 2017 LineupLettuceThe Wood BrothersBrett DennenLee Fields & The ExpressionsMartin SextonRyan MontbleauThe Marcus King BandSession AmericanaThe Ballroom ThievesKat WrightDwight and NicoleTwisted PineJulie RhodesMatthew Stubbs and the AntiguasLuxDeluxeSean McConnellJosh and the Jamtones[cover photo courtesy of Owen S. Jordan]last_img read more

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10Bet: Blackburn, the Baggies and effective brand-building

first_img EFL urges government to rethink gambling sponsorship ban July 3, 2020 EFL set to broadcast remaining games whilst behind closed doors April 17, 2020 Related Articles Shayne Lambie, UK Country Manager at 10Bet, explains the strategy behind the fast-growing operator’s partnerships with EFL clubs Blackburn Rovers and West Brom.The goal of any ambitious operator is clearly to attract the right sort of long-term customer. Using the momentum we built up prior to and during the World Cup, 10Bet has been able to retain many of the seasonal punters who signed up over the summer, and an essential ingredient of that success has been cementing the company’s status as a serious player on the UK betting scene.  Just before the start of the new season, we put the finishing touches to long-term deals with both Blackburn Rovers and West Bromwich Albion, two storied clubs with passionate fans and huge potential in terms of returning to the top flight and restoring their former greatness. It’s important to note that these are complementary agreements. While we’re the Official Principal Sponsor of Blackburn, we’re the Official Betting Partner of WBA – both of which are global partnerships. That distinction isn’t merely a matter of our new visual identity being on the front of Rover’s shirts and on the back of the Baggies’ – it means that our activities in the North-west are inevitably more intense than in the Black Country. The West Brom deal, in other words, is primarily about brand awareness while the Blackburn sponsorship is far more wide-ranging. But signing both agreements was a very deliberate decision. At 10Bet, we’re fans of the game first and foremost, and if we’d put all our eggs in one basket with Blackburn or a principal sponsorship of a Premier League club, we might have risked being pigeon-holed. By putting down firm roots in Lancashire and West Midlands – two true football hotbeds – we’re telling English fans that we care about the bigger picture. Getting involvedBlackburn are already proving to be a joy to work with. They’re accommodating in terms of granting access, flexible about schedules, considerate when it comes to looping us on their plans, generous concerning inventory like signed shirts and, above all, receptive to our ideas. Working with leading activation agencies, we’re looking forward to hosting a wide range of projects, from events in and around Ewood Park to the type of guerrilla marketing that garners national press. Social media is at the heart of our efforts to reach out to the fans of both clubs. We’ve invested in building the right team to achieve organic growth, especially on Twitter. Engaging the club and particularly the players directly is a winning approach, and it’s always great when the likes of Bradley Dack retweet your posts. The beauty of social is that it’s a two-way street. The fans aren’t just passive recipients. We love it when supporters ping us with requests for price boosts and special promotions. This is something we actively encourage and is most noticeable on the 10Bet Twitter feed.Content, however, is always king. What fans want are exclusives like interviews with the manager and the top players, and that’s why we’ve been delighted to leverage our access to provide Q&As with the likes of striker Danny Graham. And as our relationship with the club deepens, we’re looking to line up additional events and to contribute proactively to Blackburn’s overall media strategy. Along with in-stadium advertising, the matchday programme represents valuable offline real estate. We’re supplying unique editorial content, offer-specific adverts and exclusive app promotions attracting players to our 360° mobile experience – complete with those all-important QR codes, of course. Meanwhile local media, including fanzines, is another vital part of the picture. At the end of the day, we’re not only building a rapport with the fans. It’s also about the local communities they’re at the heart of.Bringing in the bettorsOur aggressive onsite strategy prior to and during the World Cup was based on a wide range of special promotions, many of which we’re adapting for the current season. Other offers are built entirely around Blackburn, such as headline monthly club offers and tactical price boosts offering more value to Rovers fans.These include insurance on our industry-leading, fully automated bet builder Create Your Bet, an outright offer on Blackburn finishing in the top six, free bets triggered by goals for specific players, our ever-popular bore draw cashback and a host of casino cross-promotions, all adding genuine value for the fans. Working hand in hand with our Business Intelligence department, we’ve even been able to identify significant upsurges in registrations, deposits, promo take-up and overall turnover centred around both Blackburn and West Bromwich. Although it’s still early days, the numbers we’re seeing and the feedback we’re getting demonstrate that we made the right choice in partnering with Blackburn and West Brom. As the season progresses, we’re backing both clubs all the way and hope to play our part in getting them back into the Premier League. Share Submit StumbleUpon Share SBTech confident of resuming full client operations following cyberattack March 31, 2020last_img read more

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MALIN HEAD COAST GUARD HELPS SAVE CREW – IN THE MED!

first_imgMALIN Head Coast Guard station officers have become world famous for helping out ships in distress in far-flung oceans.Last year staff picked up one alert…in the South China Sea!And yesterday their incredible skills helped with the rescue of a boat and her crew in the Mediterranean Sea. The may-day alert was picked up using old-fashioned radio transmissions“Ships don’t use medium and high frequency transmissions much these days and the Irish Coast Guard is one of the last to listen out on the frequencies as satellite communications have taken over,” said a Coast Guard spokesman.“However its still maintained for the fishing fleets off our coast and as long range back up communications for lifeboats and Search and Rescue helicopters.“Last night Malin received an alert off Gibraltar and were able to warn the Spanish authorities in Madrid.” It’s understood a fishing boat and crew were later taken to safety after getting into difficulty. MALIN HEAD COAST GUARD HELPS SAVE CREW – IN THE MED! was last modified: August 30th, 2013 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Eugenics in Space

first_imgTo “keep evolution on a favorable track,” spacefaring humans may want to cull bad genes, a futurist says.Enter chief speculator, Cameron Smith of Portland State University, whose “day job” is teaching evolution.  In Elizabeth Howell’s post on Live Science, “Will Humans Keep Evolving on Ultra-Long Space Voyages?“, Smith was given free rein to fantasize about starship populations transporting human wretchedness across the light-years, to pollute other worlds some distant day.  One of the factors that he thinks can’t be overlooked is evolution.  A teacher of evolution at the university, Smith feels “evolution will continue on starships despite the best attempts to limit it.”“I believe that new pressure, breathing-gas compositions, gravity and radiation environments will act on the early stages of embryo and fetus development; this will be natural selection of new selective agents on the genome,” Smith told SPACE.com in an email after stating his views in a recent Scientific American podcast.“Precisely what new characteristics will be selected for or against, and spread or be deleted from the population, is very hard to predict, however.”It might seem odd that a teacher of evolution equates natural selection with inheritance of acquired characteristics (Lamarckism) in the embryo, but Howell didn’t stop him right there.  Instead, she let him launch into unfettered prediction about what is very hard to predict, and to advise politicians he will never see about how to “keep evolution on a favorable track” —To keep evolution on a favorable track, the early space colonists should be screened as much as possible for genetic problems, Smith said.His advice primarily wobbled around the “founder effect” of a new population and the minimum population size to avert inbreeding, though he correctly noted that the single-gene disease notion is “melting away” under new discoveries of polygenic disease and epigenetics.  Interfering with evolution raises ominous thoughts about eugenics, so he wanted to make it clear he is not one of “them” —He stressed that he doesn’t mean breeding a “super-race” of humans, which would open moral issues.But if evolution is as evolution does, and if evolution brought humans to existence, what are morals?  Where did they evolve from?  Wouldn’t the rigors of space require a super-race of space travelers, with evolutionary biologists advising tyrannical captains and an ample supply of obedient peasants to do the work?  It’s unclear why Smith preferred the happy, cooperative Star Trek crew, when evolution produces anything that gets the job done.  Maybe that’s just his personal preference.If Smith is feeling some sense of moral obligation, it might be described as a mutation interfering with the inexorable random track of evolution.  If natural selection produces a batch of obese slackers on the ship, as depicted in the Disney movie Wall-E (mentioned by Howell as some kind of bad outcome), who’s he to complain?  Why would anyone offer “best attempts to limit it”?  Evolve or perish; evolve and perish; nobody cares.Question: what do you get when you subject embryos to “new pressure, breathing-gas compositions, gravity and radiation environments”?  You can find out with experiments on fruit flies in the space station.  Do you get “new selective agents” in the genome?  No; you get dead embryos.  But even for any that survive, they will not pass on their genes unless the selection occurs in the gametes.  A mutation in the embryo is too late; its phenotype is an evolutionary dead end.  Here we see a professor of evolution presenting Lamarckism as an example of how Darwinian evolution works.  Astonishing.No, we’re not advocating a super race, Smith says.  We just want to keep the unfit from breeding.  Sound familiar?Sometimes you just have to stand back and let the illogic of these people implode.  If it were that simple, everyone would see it, but the fact that Space.com and Live Science still put this illogic out there means we have to keep pointing it out until they fear the inevitable backlash from informed citizens.  Cameron Smith is defeating his own premise by desiring to guide evolution on moral grounds.  The key point of Darwinian evolution is that it is unguided.  If Smith wants to guide it to keep evolution on a “favorable” track, he’s promoting artificial selection – a form of intelligent design – on human beings, which is eugenics.  But the spectre of its dark past scares him, so he quickly backpedals, stressing that he doesn’t mean breeding a super-race, “which would open moral issues.”  Whose moral issues?  His?If Smith is feeling a moral obligation to prevent the horrors of breeding a super race, that’s more than a personal preference.  That’s his conscience speaking.  If he were a consistent evolutionist, he would dismiss his moral feelings as irrelevant fluff.  But he can’t.  Deep down, he wants to see love, fairness, beauty and health continue on in a population maintaining genuine human nature.  He cannot escape the image his Creator implanted in him. 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Got Scientism? Champions of “Science” All Leftists

first_imgThe Union of Concerned Scientists’ list of champions only includes those who take far-left political stances on the issues.Live Science republished a list from the Union of Concerned Scientists by Seth Shulman, one of their senior staff writers.  Under the title, “Got Science?  Champions Who Stood Up for Science in 2013,” the list is noteworthy for its extreme leftist bias.  Even though his list of six champions promises to include those “from every political persuasion,” the two arguably conservative entrants were nevertheless praised for standing against other conservatives on political issues.  The list appears to equate “science” with left-leaning political positions on each issue, such as:Evolution: Kentucky Governor Steven Beshear is honored for opposing the strong majority in the legislative committee that opposed the Next Generation Science Standards that teach evolution and global warming as fact without any evidence against it.Climate Change: Jennifer Jurado is praised for working with President Obama to prepare some Florida counties for rising sea levels expected from climate change.Fracking: Kelly Giddens is a champion for opposing fracking in Colorado, a practice that could make the United States energy independent, create jobs, and actually reduce carbon emissions.Censorship: Paul Thornton is praised for getting the L.A. Times to cease printing any letters critical of global warming.Solar Power: The lone conservative in the group, Debbie Dooley of the Atlanta Tea Party, is honored for her “green tea party” action by standing against the Koch brothers and advocating expansion of solar power.Climate Science: Al Dutcher, a climatologist the article says is a “self-described conservative” is praised for standing up against conservatives on the issue of global warming.Shulman is half right when he says:With Congressional partisanship reaching unprecedented levels and science too frequently under attack from a vocal minority, it’s all the more vital to stand up for the basic idea that choices should be informed by the best evidence and data available. That means insisting that kids are taught solid science unfettered by political or religious doctrine, that people face up to what’s actually known about the climate realities we confront, and that we draw a bright line to differentiate science-based fact from politically motivated disinformation.– but he is half-wrong when he assumes “politically motivated disinformation” is a one-party problem.  Our previous entry (12/09/13) showed that scientists are not immune from the herd mentality and the many human foibles that beset most other people – perhaps more.  Other entries have shown (although this is common knowledge) that denizens of academia and the press tend to be predominantly leftist.  For Shulman, therefore, to list only scientists who equate advocating leftist political positions with “standing up for science” says more about his ideology than the solidity of the evidence.Got evidence?  It’s not evidence until it stands up to the best that critics have to say.  It’s pretty clear that Shulman and Live Science have taken up positions on evolution,  climate change and energy policy by (1) assumption, (2) herd mentality, (3) political bias, or (4) all of the above, without doing a proper literature search on the best arguments of critics of the leftist positions.  Instead, they commandeer “consensus science” as props for their chosen positions, accusing anyone who disagrees with them of being “anti-science.”But if the qualification is to “stand up for science,” why didn’t they list Stephen Meyer, whose best-seller Darwin’s Doubt stood up against the dogmatic, intolerant, anti-evidence Darwin Party over the issue of the Cambrian Explosion?  As for climate change, there are also spokespersons against the global-warming hysteria who have expertise not beholden to the Koch brothers or any other bogeymen, but whose voices are routinely squelched by the media.  In a phony show of bipartisanship, they listed two “conservatives,” but only when they advocated leftist positions or compromised with them.You can tell a leftist.  They are characterized by emotion over logic, dogmatism, simplistic unworkable answers (like “visualize world peace”), improper characterization of science as a uniform support for leftism, scare tactics, a desire to control their fellow human beings, the belief that government is the answer to everything (that’s why leftist is roughly equivalent to statist), hatred for the successful, disgust with religion, tendency to fall for utopian dreams, belief in equality of outcome instead of equality of opportunity, a desire to make everyone equally miserable, a herd mentality, undying faith in the UN and globalism, rejection of traditional values, promotion of those who tear down traditional values, advocacy of unlimited abortion, a collective mindset instead of respect for individual rights, impatience with debate (claiming “the science is settled – nothing to debate here”), amnesia over leftist failures (e.g., French revolution, communism), propensity to mischaracterize conservative views, readiness to label conservatives with hate-words, heavy use of cliches (like “social justice” and “global governance”), a bad habit of hiding their own radical positions behind euphemisms (like “reproductive health” for “abortion”) but attributing the worst motives (like “racism”) to their opponents, advocacy of politically-correct speech codes, no sense of responsibility, inability to answer a straight question without veering into talking points, reticence to apologize when proven wrong, tolerance of perversion, tendency to view everything in evolutionary terms (especially the Constitution), embrace of the myth of progress, devotion to Father Charlie Darwin, and shoddy scholarship.  A quicker way to tell a leftist is to look for those with sour, dour, snooty looks on their faces.  You can tell a leftist, but you can’t tell it* much.*Gender-neutral pronoun used in deference to the Left to avoid uncomfortableness with gender distinctions. 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Pineapple plant to boost exports

first_img10 June 2003Deputy Trade and Industry Minister Lindiwe Hendricks last week opened a R7-million pineapple processing plant in East London.Collondale Cannery is one of only two pineapple processing factories in South Africa, and has installed a plant with a new evaporator specifically imported for processing pineapple juice concentrate.South Africa accounts for six percent of the world’s pineapple production. The world market is dominated by Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines and Kenya.South African pineapples are traditionally less sweet and more acidic than those of its competitors. However, a blend between South African pineapple concentrate and that of the country’s competitors results in a sweeter product, but with the distinctive pineapple taste unique to the South African product.The new plant illustrates the value of investment in production capacity for export sales and job creation. The new Collondale plant incorporates the latest technology that will enable the company to up its production of pineapple juice concentrate by 50 percent. All of this will be exported, generating sales of R7-million per annum.As a result, the company can now run a full seven production lines from its factory and employ 55 additional people.The Eastern Cape benefits from the growing and processing of pineapples in the region because it is a labour-intensive venture. Collondale currently employs 297 people.Source: Department of Trade and Industrylast_img read more

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SA wine set for futures trading

first_img25 July 2007A leading South African wine may soon be listed on the Chicago Futures Exchange, with local wine estate Cloof appointing an asset manager to register their signature shiraz wine, Crucible, for futures trading.Cloof’s wine marketer Oscar Foulkes told Business Day this week that the estate had appointed Flagship Private Asset Management to handle the registration of Crucible futures on the exchange.“Last week we began distributing Crucible Futures to buyers of the 2006 The Very Sexy Shiraz, as a way of guaranteeing access to the rarest of our wines,” Cloof said on its website.A Crucible future will give its holder the right, but not the obligation, to buy one bottle of 2006 Crucible at R295, the cellar-door price of a 2004 vintage.“This instrument not only guarantees access to this singular wine, but does so at a discounted price,” said the estate, which is situated on the outskirts of Atlantis in the Western Cape.“When the wine is released in October, holders will have until 15 November to redeem their futures, after which they expire. Futures can only be redeemed at Cloof.”The Crucible shiraz is a fairly rare wine, having only been produced in 2003, 2004 and 2006, while the estate is hoping for a 2008 vintage. The 2003 and 2004 vintages were nominated for five stars in the John Platter guide, topping a long list of local and international awards and medals.According to the estate, the combination of demand and extremely limited supply, against the backdrop of rising fine wine prices, is having an impact on Crucible’s selling price.“The Live-ex 100 index, which tracks the auction prices of the world’s 100 most investable wines, is up by 42% this year as global affluence chases a limited supply of top-end wines,” Cloof said.Foulkes told Business Day he believed that, should the futures gain value, they could at some point start to determine the price of the wines.He said that unlike top French wines, that could command any price, South African wines seemed to have hit a “glass ceiling” as far as price was concerned.“Up to now Crucible has been available to buy on a first come, first served basis, even to Pick ‘n Pay, which is unusual for a wine of this nature,” Foulkes said.SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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UPDATED: Guman charged over Fort Lauderdale shooting rampage

first_imgThe man who killed five people and injured six during a shooting rampage on Friday in Florida’s Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport has been charged and could face the death penalty.Esteban Santiago was charged with an act of violence at an international airport resulting in death, which carries the death penalty, and weapons offences.Authorities have found no evidence during preliminary inquiries that 26-year-old Santiago was working with anybody else when he took out a pistol from his checked luggage and fired two clips of ammunition at passengers in the baggage claim area of the airport’s Terminal 2.It has since been revealed that Santiago walked into an Alaskan FBI office in November and claimed his mind was being controlled by US intelligence agencies.His agitated and incoherent state rompted FBI agents to notify authorities, take the gun and order a mental health assessment.But CNN reported he wasn’t considered disturbed enough to be prevented under Alaskan law from owning a gun and it was returned to him a month later. The news channel said this was the 9mm Walther pistol that was used to shoot the 11 people at the airport on Friday.Santiago, a veteran of Iraq, has reportedly confessed to planning the attack but has yet to reveal why. He bought a one-way ticket to Fort Lauderdale and loaded the gun in a toilet stall. US federal prosecutors said he shot the first people he saw, aiming at their heads.”Once he finished shooting, he walked down by Door 2, threw his gun on the ground, and laid down on the ground, spread-eagle, until the first officer came — which was probably a minute later,” witness Mark Lea told MSNBC. “He was not shot at all, was not wounded.”Fort Lauderdale is serviced by about 30 airlines and is a popular destination because of the nearby cruise terminals. It services about 73,000 passengers a day.Delta chief executive Ed Bastian, whose airline operates from terminal 2, expressed gratitude to first responders “who immediately went into action to evacuate our customers and employees’’. “The thoughts and prayers of the entire Delta family are with the people of Fort Lauderdale and Broward County, and those involved in the tragic events today,” Bastian said.Delta, which cancelled all flights to Fort Lauderdale on Friday, issued a waiver for customers travelling to and from Fort Lauderdale to change their travel plans free of charge.Terminal 2 also remained closed on Saturday due to the ongoing investigation.The shooting exposes a possible loophole in US security procedures as the baggage claim was outside the security perimeter at the airport.last_img read more

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Up-cycling for a better community

first_imgSAfmarine’s container classroom for Vissershoek Primary School in the Western Cape. The ‘sport in a box’ Piketberg container project, which was shortlisted as one of 12 contenders in the running for the 2011/2012 AfriSam/SAIA Award for Sustainable Architecture.(Images: Tsai Design Studio)MEDIA CONTACTS • Debbie OwenMedia Manager, SAfmarine+27 21 788 9962RELATED ARTICLES• Education at the movies• Board game makes Aids education fun• SA education project wins top award• A winning open education systemCadine Pillay The term ‘up-cycling’ is often used to describe the conversion of unused items into tools of value that benefit communities. In the case of Copenhagen-based shipping company Safmarine, formed in 1946 in Cape Town, decommissioned shipping containers come in handy with efforts to uplift and improve the quality of education in disadvantaged communities across the country.Containers became popular as multi-purpose tools in the 1990s, rapidly gaining popularity as cost-effective alternatives for infrastructure such as day care centres, school classrooms and even libraries in some communities. One of the latest innovative transformations of a container is into a sports centre for the community of Piketberg, 120km north of Cape Town in the Western Cape.The centre – also referred to as “Sport in a box” – forms part of the Containers in the Community initiative, pioneered by Safmarine in 1991. Through the programme the company has donated more than 8 000 containers to more than 3 000 projects, most of them education-orientated, nationally.A team effortThe sports centre is a collaborative effort between Safmarine, Tsai Design Studio, which designed the facility, and marketing company Star South Fruits. It provides a safe after-school environment for more than 100 children in the area, thanks to the efforts of NGO Stars in their Eyes Foundation, which approached Safmarine.Stars in their Eyes is run jointly by Dutch fresh produce company Cool Fresh International and the Western Cape’s Department of Cultural Affairs and Sport. Each participating disadvantaged community is twinned with a Dutch football club to give local coaches training in football techniques and life skills, which are then passed on to the youngsters.“The foundation innovatively combines the joy of football with the alleviation of social problems,” said Johan van Niekerk, marketing director of Star South Fruits.“The programme was initiated by Freedom Fruit, an international fresh produce brand established by Cool Fresh International.”Among the centre’s key design elements is a grandstand seating facility for spectators. This runs along one of the container’s long sides and is sheltered by corrugated iron sheeting to provide shade for the audience and the centre. Another innovative element is the advertising space on the opposite side of the container that can be used by local businesses to help generate income for the centre. Alternatively, this space can be converted into a screen for local children to watch movies.Safmarine has, over the past few years, started working with socially responsive industrial designers to come up with design ideas that are sustainable and environmentally sound.The current average investment per project is around R500 000 (US $60 500), but this amount will vary according to the size and scale of the project.Winning design ideasWhile Containers in the Community has won numerous shipping industry awards in the past, it has more recently caught the attention of the design community.‘Sport in a box’ is one of 12 contenders in the running for the 2011/2012 AfriSam/SAIA Award for Sustainable Architecture. The winner will be announced in October 2012.According to AfriSam, a construction materials company, the awards are aimed at recognising outstanding achievement in sustainable architecture. Their partner in the initiative, SAIA, the South African Institute of Architects, is the industry authority. The awards programme supports SAIA’s goals of recognising and promoting excellence in architecture, and creating public awareness and debate on architectural issues.“We are delighted that Safmarine’s shipping containers, which spend many years at sea carrying cargo from one end of the globe to the other, are increasingly becoming a source of inspiration for talented architects and designers around the world,” said Safmarine’s Debbie Owen.“The recent contribution made by the design and architectural community in helping us to creatively and sustainably convert these boxes, has been an important one and recognition – such as with the shortlisting for the Afrisam/SAIA Sustainable Architecture Award – is important as the shipping container, and its contribution to our society, is now being viewed in a more holistic manner.”Community designersBesides acquiring the services of talented designers, Containers in the Community also puts the challenge to members of the community. In 2011 Safmarine and food and clothing retailer Woolworths launched a design competition where contestants were required to create a classroom for the grade R pupils of Vissershok Primary School near Durbanville, also in the Western Cape, using a container.A concept by Marshaan Brink, a pupil at Stellenberg High School, took top honours, and he had the opportunity to work with professional designers and architects and see his idea come to life. Brink was present when the brightly painted classroom was handed over to the pupils.Containers in the Community projects have also been implemented in Brazil, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Liberia and Tanzania.last_img read more

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Team to look at potential impact of Karoo shale gas

first_img13 May 2015The South African government has commissioned an investigation into the possible effects and potential mitigation opportunities of shale gas if it is found in the country.“If indeed viable deposits are found in South Africa, shale gas, as a relatively lower carbon energy source, presents significant transformative potential for the South African economy,” Science and Technology Minister Naledi Pandor said in Pretoria on 12 May.The government had commissioned the Strategic Environmental Assessment of Shale Gas Development to look into the resource, she explained. “Not only could the exploitation of deposits of lower carbon shale gas – if found – result in the provision of affordable and safe energy, but it is also a potential source of job creation, foreign exchange and investment.”It would also contribute towards South Africa’s energy security, Pandor said. She was speaking at a media briefing as the representative of a ministerial task team comprising the departments of Environmental Affairs, Mineral Resources, Energy, and Water and Sanitation.The Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) was launched at the briefing. Pandor explained that the assessment would be a scientific undertaking done to improve the understanding of the risks of and opportunities for shale gas development. “We believe that this will assist [the] government to create a framework and guiding principles to inform responsible decision-making.Exploration and production“The Strategic Environmental Assessment will consider both exploration- and production-related activities and impacts of shale gas development, including the process of hydraulic fracturing, and will include an assessment of all material social, economic and biophysical risks and opportunities presented,” she said.The study area will include regions of the Karoo Basin which currently have exploration rights; applications are pending in Northern Cape, Eastern Cape and Western Cape. It will run over 24 months.A project team comprising the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), the South African National Biodiversity Institute and the Council for Geoscience will undertake the SEA. It will be led by systems ecologist Professor Bob Scholes of the University of the Witwatersrand; he is also a research associate of the CSIR.“The three affected provinces, namely Western Cape, Eastern Cape and Northern Cape, are part of the national project executive committee. The governance structure includes a process custodian group compromising 15 representatives from the government, research institutions, industry experts and non-government organisations,” Pandor said.The people of South Africa would most benefit if it was found that viable deposits of lower carbon shale gas existed, enabling exploitation, extraction and development.“We do, however, recognise we are not at a stage where we can say with certainty that there are significant deposits.”Impact on the environmentThe interdepartmental task team must consider:Environmental impact on ecosystems, waste management, etc;Challenges of impact on water, given that South Africa is a water-scarce country;Possible impact on the already progressing Square Kilometre Array; and,Establishment of a regulatory regime that would guide all processes.The assessment must be “salient” and cover all the important issues and concerns around shale gas. It must include groups of leading experts to ensure “credibility”, and be grounded in transparent and participatory processes to ensure “legitimacy”, Pandor said.“To further ensure that the SEA process is ‘salient’, ‘legitimate’ and ‘credible’, the project team will be supported by a multi-author team comprising of scientists and experts from a broad range of sectors from across different provinces of South Africa. to ensure that a broad balance of interest is represented. Each strategic issue identified will be addressed by the teams of authors, who are recognised experts and knowledgeable persons. The work of the multi-author teams will in turn be reviewed by independent experts.”Informed by existing literature and public concerns, the following strategic issues have been identifies as part of the scope of the assessment:Biodiversity and ecosystem services;Water resources (surface and ground water);Geophysics;Economics (including agriculture and tourism);Spatial planning;National energy planning;Waste management;Human health;Air quality;Social fabric;Visual;Heritage resources; and,Sense of place.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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