News bites from around the world

first_imgPrint WhatsApp Email Linkedin Don’t drink the liquid nitrogen…!A BRITISH teenager has had her stomach surgically removed to save her life after drinking a cocktail made with liquid nitrogen. According to The Guardian, Gaby Scanlon was celebrating her 18th birthday at Oscar’s Wine Bar in Lancaster when she allegedly drank what’s called a Pornstar Martini.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up According to a cache of Oscar’s Facebook page (the page has since been pulled), the drink, which is no longer available, consists of “passion fruit, Cartel (vanilla vodka) and pineapple juice, with the bonus of a shot of Moet and Chanson!! It’s AMAZING! All for £8:95 and also liquid nitrogen, to create a smoky effect”. The teen somehow managed to ingest some of the liquid nitrogen which caused a perforation in her stomach lining. She was immediately hospitalised and is now recovering from surgery. Bugs, Noma and school lunchesTHE world’s best chef from the world’s best restaurant, René Redzepi, brought samples of foraged food to an interview in New York from his restaurant for the audience: rose hips, fermented and dried mushrooms, paste of wood ants, and a fish sauce-like brew made from “piles and piles of corpses of crickets.”Eater.com reported that, “Unsurprisingly, the conversation largely covered Redzepi’s famed foraging and use of local Danish insects, but he also talked about a new book he’s working on.” No it’s not about the wonderful world of Michelin dishes – it’s about making lunches for your kids.Redzepi did share some things. Here are just a few, eater.com has the full interview.On the evolution of Noma: “Within a few years, it stopped making sense, this 85-hour work week where you’re constantly cooking somebody else’s ideas or ways of looking at food. And that’s when ‘Time and Place’ started and that became the core of everything we do now.”On bugs: “I know it’s taboo to eat bugs in the Western world, but why not, when it adds letters to your vocabulary? … You go to Southeast Asia and this is a common thing. You read about it from all over the world, that people are eating bugs. Of course, we eat things from bugs as well. Most of it we don’t know – a worm, a mushroom. If you like mushrooms, you’ve eaten so many worms you cannot imagine. But also we eat honey, and honey is the vomit of a bee. Actually it is. So think of that next time you pour it into your tea, that it’s bug vomit basically.”On making lunches for his one- and four-year-old daughters: “It’s the most nerve-wracking thing there is in the entire world because you never know what happens. The thing they enjoyed last week, they might look and say, ‘I don’t want that, I hate it,’ the following week. And the most important thing for you is that your children have a healthy and happy relationship with flavours and with food. So this little moment I have every morning, where I’m planning the lunch box, is truly one of the most nerve wracking moments I have through the whole day.” NewsNews bites from around the worldBy admin – October 15, 2012 500 center_img Advertisement Twitter Facebook Previous articleWorld Food Day at Thomond ParkNext articleNine arrested in connection with dissident activity adminlast_img read more

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Woodside picks KBR for work on Browse FPSOs concept

first_imgAustralian energy company Woodside has awarded KBR the Concept Definition engineering contract for the two gas FPSO facilities for the proposed $20 billion Browse to North West Shelf Development, located offshore Western Australia. Image source: WoodsideWoodside has launched the engineering services contract to define all elements of the hull and topsides of two FPSOs for remote environment operations. The engineering work is expected to be performed up to the end of H1 2019, KBR said on Thursday.The Browse project aims to bring online the Brecknock, Calliance, and Torosa fields offshore W. Australia containing gross contingent resources (2C) of 15.4 trillion cubic feet of dry gas and 453 million barrels of condensate).Woodside had planned to develop the fields using three separate Floating LNG units, however, the company in 2016 stopped the FLNG project citing “current economic and market environment.“The company has recently revealed it is leaning towards the development using two gas Floating Production Storage and Offloading Units (gFPSO) delivering around 10 mtpa of gas to NWS infrastructure by an approximately 900 km pipeline. This was affirmed by KBR on Thursday.Stuart Bradie, KBR President and CEO said: “We are delighted to be awarded the Concept Definition engineering of the two FPSO facilities delivering our operational agility in the execution of projects, strong base business and world-class asset performance to the project.”Browse developmentIn a recent investor presentation, Woodside said the two FPSOs would be connected to the North Rankin Complex, from where the gas would be shipped via a 900 km pipeline to the Woodside-operated North West Shelf infrastructure.FEED entry for the Browse project is slated for 2019, with the final investment decision expected in 2021.According to Woodside’s timeline, the Calliance and Brecknock fields are expected to be ready for start-up in 2026, with 2027 targeted for the Torosa field.The whole development is expected to cost some $20 billion.Offshore Energy Today Stafflast_img read more

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