RCMP catch alleged parking meter vandal

first_imgEarly Saturday morning, the Fort St. John RCMP arrested a man they believe is responsible for recent parking meter vandalism.At approximately 3 a.m., the Fort St. John Crime Reduction Unit with the assistance of General Duty members located a 42 year-old Fort St. John male allegedly breaking parking meters on 100th street at 100th avenue.The male was located wearing shoes that matched impressions left near other broken meters and in possession of a large amount of quarters.- Advertisement -Over the last week, the City has reported over $50,000 in damage as a result of the parking meter vandalism and left.The investigation continues and charges of theft under $5,000 and mischief over $5,000 are pending. The RCMP cannot release the name of the accused at this time.If you have any further information about this crime, contact the RCMP at 250-787-8140 or Crimestoppers at 1-800-222-8477. You can also go online to www.crimestoppersfsj.ca Advertisementlast_img read more

Read More

Microbes surviving deep inside oceanic crust

first_img Journal information: Science The paper, published in Science, reports on the analyses of samples of oceanic crust collected during a 2004 expedition to 100 kilometers off the Juan de Fuca Ridge off the coast of Washington state in the U.S..The oceanic crust is a layer of volcanic rock several kilometers thick and covered by thick layers of sediments. Oceanic rock covers around 60 percent of the Earth’s surface and is therefore potentially the largest biosphere on the planet. Microorganisms have been discovered on exposed surfaces of the oceanic crust and in the sediments above it, but the new study is the first to reveal that microbes also live deep within the crust.Mark A. Lever, of the Department of BioScience at Aarhus University in Denmark and an international team of microbiologists drilled through the sea-bottom sediment and deep into the oceanic crust beneath to collect samples for various tests. The sediment depth at the drilling site was about 260 meters thick, and the team collected samples from about 350 to 580 meters deep into the basalt rock beneath, in a region known as the “dark biosphere.” The age of the rock was estimated at 3.5 million yearsThe team ensured all their equipment was sterile to ensure the rock samples were uncontaminated. They also added marker chemicals to the fluid used in drilling, and later confirmed that while these chemicals were found on the rock sample surfaces, almost none found their way inside the rocks. They sterilized the outer surfaces before breaking the rock samples open.The researchers found microbe genes within the rock samples, and to determine if the genes were from living microorganisms or extinct species, they incubated the samples at 65 degrees C (the temperature of the location at which they were found) in water similar chemically to that in their native location, which is rich in chemicals but poor in oxygen. After two years (enough for the slow-growing microorganisms to re-establish themselves) they transferred samples to another container containing sterilized rocks and the same water. They incubated these samples for a further five years.The incubated samples began to produce methane and the carbon-13 concentration reduced, which showed that the microbes in the rock were alive. The scientists concluded the organisms were most likely deriving energy from chemical reactions taking place in the interfaces between the iron-laden rock and water. The chemical reactions produce hydrogen, which the microorganisms use to produce organic matter. Other microbes were identified, which survived by consuming sulfur. These processes of energy production are known as chemosynthesis.The findings suggest that the ecosystems in the oceanic crust are fundamentally different from other ecosystems in that their energy is derived ultimately from chemosynthesis rather than photosynthesis, which derives energy from light.Chemosynthesis is also known to be used by life forms in habitats such as deep boreholes or hydrothermal vents on the fringes of continental plates. The new study suggests that chemosynthesis is possibly more important than photosynthesis in terms of the biomass involved in the processes, depending on how extensive these sort of ecosystems are. Lever also said it is “quite likely there is similar life on other planets.”Dr Lever and his team expect to analyze other samples collected from ocean crusts beneath the North Atlantic and other locations in the Pacific Ocean. Energy from Earth’s interior supports life in global ecosystem Explore further Citation: Microbes surviving deep inside oceanic crust (2013, March 15) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-03-microbes-surviving-deep-oceanic-crust.html More information: Evidence for Microbial Carbon and Sulfur Cycling in Deeply Buried Ridge Flank Basalt, Science 15 March 2013: Vol. 339 no. 6125 pp. 1305-1308 DOI: 10.1126/science.1229240AbstractSediment-covered basalt on the flanks of mid-ocean ridges constitutes most of Earth’s oceanic crust, but the composition and metabolic function of its microbial ecosystem are largely unknown. By drilling into 3.5-million-year-old subseafloor basalt, we demonstrated the presence of methane- and sulfur-cycling microbes on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Depth horizons with functional genes indicative of methane-cycling and sulfate-reducing microorganisms are enriched in solid-phase sulfur and total organic carbon, host δ13C- and δ34S-isotopic values with a biological imprint, and show clear signs of microbial activity when incubated in the laboratory. Downcore changes in carbon and sulfur cycling show discrete geochemical intervals with chemoautotrophic δ13C signatures locally attenuated by heterotrophic metabolism. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org) —A new study shows for the first time that microorganisms are thriving deep within the oceanic crust under the sea floor, and hence far from light or oxygen. © 2013 Phys.org , Carbon (A) Map of study area. (B) General direction of subsurface flow from Grizzly Bare outcrop to the Baby Bare Spring area. (C) Cross section through basalt core, showing the alteration halos that surround basalt veins or fractures. Credit: Science, DOI: 10.1126/science.1229240last_img read more

Read More

Investigators for missing Malaysia flight meet in Paris

first_imgMalaysian aviation experts met French officials on Monday to coordinate the investigation into missing flight MH370, days after the discovery of a washed-up plane part offered fresh hopes of solving the mystery.The Malaysian team arrived at the Palais de Justice in Paris shortly before 2:00 pm (local time) to meet with a French judge, a group of experts and police charged with the investigation.The meeting broke out after two hours and the Malaysian delegation left without comment to waiting reporters. They were due to release a statement after the meeting.France is leading the current phase of the investigation after a two-metre-long flaperon, already confirmed to be part of a Boeing 777, surfaced last week on the French Indian Ocean island of La Reunion.Technical experts, including from US aerospace giant Boeing, will begin from Wednesday examining the wing component, which is likely to have come from the doomed Malaysia Airlines flight as no other such plane is known to have crashed in the area.last_img read more

Read More

Denim style guide for men women

first_imgDenim jeans, shirts, skirts never go out of style. However, denims need an update from time to time, especially when there’s a handful of fresh new trends that are influencing the look.Experts suggest a few denim looks that can be sported:Denim looks for men:* Fashion is definitely getting a makeover but you can never go wrong with a classic pair of jeans. Wear it with a cool graphic tee and canvas shoes and add an edge to your overall look.* Give your off-duty separates a refreshing look by wearing a medium blue denim jeans. This wash is made to replicate the jeans you’ve had forever, with some artful destruction and expert repairs. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’* Distressed jeans are high on the trend game. Flaunt these with a casual printed tee and white sneaks. * Ripped in all the right places, the messier-the-better jeans make you look chic. Denim looks for women: * Add a little flair to your wardrobe with the classic fit jeans made out of comfortable cotton lycra fabric.* Amplify your look with  the perfect combination of comfort and stretch, the damaging at knee adds to the rugged denim look. Sport it with any top or shirt for a casual day out look.* Sport a pair of denims with cool pintuck detailing at the knee. Team it up with a chic crop top or tee for a complete look.last_img read more

Read More

Rose Valley investors can approach asset disposal committee for refund Official

first_imgKolkata: The Enforcement Directorate (ED), probing into the multi-crore Rose Valley ponzi scam case, has urged the duped investors to approach the asset disposal committee appointed by the Calcutta High Court to recover their dues. According to an ED official, the investors, who were promised high returns on their investments by the ponzi firm, are free to approach the committee which was set up following a high court suggestion in 2015. “In the Rose Valley ponzi scam case, so far the ED has attached properties worth Rs 4,600 crore,” an ED official, who did not wish to be named, told PTI. Also Read – Bose & Gandhi: More similar than apart, says Sugata Bose The enforcement agency attached Rese Valley properties worth Rs 2,300 crore in one go, including two dozen hotels and resorts, which till date is the single largest attachment in the case. The assets are to be sold off via public auction and the proceeds would be used to repay the investors. The ED had registered an FIR against the firm, its Chairman Gautam Kundu and others in 2014 under the Prevention of Money Laundering Act (PMLA). Kundu was arrested by the agency in Kolkata in 2015. Multiple charge sheets have been filed in the courts in Kolkata and Bhubaneswar by the ED in the case. The group had allegedly floated a total of 27 companies to run the chit fund operations, of which only 6 were active.last_img read more

Read More