South Africa to play in Pakistan? PCB chairman Ehsan Mani hopes to convince CSA

first_imgThe Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) chairman Ehsan Mani will travel to South Africa on Monday on a mission to convince Cricket South Africa (CSA) to support the return of international cricket to the troubled nation.Mani has said that his main priority remains to see the return of full international cricket to Pakistan and the country again hosting ICC events.An official source in the board told PTI that Mani would also be persuading the South African cricket officials to continue their support for the return of international cricket to Pakistan as last year the World XI included several South African players.”Mani will request them to also play a short limited over series sometime in 2019 in Pakistan, the source said.Mani is also due to meet with the Pakistan team players and management before the first Test from Boxing Day in Centurion and is expected to have a meeting with head coach Mickey Arthur about plans for the coming World Cup in England.The PCB is already keeping its fingers crossed that Cricket Australia (CA) will agree to send its team to Lahore or Karachi next March to play at least two ODIs, which are part of a five-match series scheduled in the UAE before the World Cup.PCB buoyed by media reports in AustraliaThe PCB has been buoyed by media reports from Australia that CA is considering it’s request to play part of the ODI series in Pakistan.”We are in ongoing discussions with the PCB about the One-Day tour in March next year. We recognise that the PCB and the Pakistan government are taking every step to improve the security for touring cricket teams and we’ll continue discussions with the PCB as the safety and security of Australian players and support staff is our number one priority,” said a CA spokesman in Melbourne.The statement came after PCB’s newly-appointed managing director Wasim Khan maintained that he is willing to address all reservations including security arrangements.CA has not sent its team to Pakistan since 1998.In March, 2009 after militants attacked the Sri Lankan team bus in Lahore, top teams have declined to tour the country due to security concerns.But since last year, the PCB has succeeded in bringing some international cricket to home by hosting a short T20 series against an ICC World Eleven in Lahore last September and then hosting a lone T20 game against Sri Lanka also in Lahore in October.This year in April, the West Indies also toured and played a three-match T20 rubber in Karachi.advertisementAlso Read | Pakistan will be ready for Virat Kohli in 2019 World Cup: Wahab RiazAlso See:last_img read more

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Why The Cavaliers Blew It All Up At The Trade Deadline

Welcome to The Lab, FiveThirtyEight’s basketball podcast. On this week’s show (Feb. 8, 2018), FiveThirtyEight editor-in-chief Nate Silver joins Neil, Chris and Kyle to help break down what happened at this year’s NBA trade deadline. The Cleveland Cavaliers shook up their roster Thursday by acquiring Jordan Clarkson, George Hill, Rodney Hood and Larry Nance Jr. and saying goodbye to Jae Crowder, Isaiah Thomas and Dwyane Wade, among others. The group also brings you a significant digit on the Knicks’ Kristaps Porzingis, another victim of this year’s seemingly never-ending stream of injuries.Here are links to what was discussed this week:ESPN’s Kevin Pelton assessed the winners and losers of the trade deadline.Kyle wrote about how the Cavaliers fixed some of their big problems — but will it be enough?FiveThirtyEight debated some hypothetical LeBron trades earlier in the week. Embed Code By Neil Paine, Chris Herring and Kyle Wagner More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed read more

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Myanmar military put on UN blacklist for sexual violence

first_imgrohingyaA new U.N. report puts Myanmar’s armed forces on a U.N. blacklist of government and rebel groups “credibly suspected” of carrying out rapes and other acts of sexual violence in conflict for the first time.An advance copy of Secretary-General Antonio Guterres’ report to the Security Council, obtained Friday by The Associated Press, says international medical staff and others in Bangladesh have documented that many of the almost 700,000 Rohingya Muslims who fled from Myanmar “bear the physical and psychological scars of brutal sexual assault.”The U.N. chief said the assaults were allegedly perpetrated by the Myanmar Armed Forces, known as the Tatmadaw, “at times acting in concert with local militias, in the course of military ‘clearance’ operations in October 2016 and August 2017.””The widespread threat and use of sexual violence was integral to this strategy, serving to humiliate, terrorise and collectively punish the Rohingya community, as a calculated tool to force them to flee their homelands and prevent their return,” Guterres said.Buddhist-majority Myanmar doesn’t recognize the Rohingya as an ethnic group, insisting they are Bengali migrants from Bangladesh living illegally in the country. It has denied them citizenship, leaving them stateless.The recent spasm of violence began when Rohingya insurgents launched a series of attacks last 25 August on about 30 security outposts and other targets. Myanmar security forces then began a scorched-earth campaign against Rohingya villages that the U.N. and human rights groups have called a campaign of ethnic cleansing.”Violence was visited upon women, including pregnant women, who are seen as custodians and propagators of ethnic identity, as well as on young children, who represent the future of the group,” Guterres said. “This can be linked to an inflammatory narrative alleging that high fertility rates among the Rohingya represent an existential threat to the majority population.”The report, which will be a focus of a U.N. Security Council meeting Monday on preventing sexual violence in conflict, puts 51 government, rebel and extremist groups on the list.They include 17 from Congo including the armed forces and national police, seven from Syria including the armed forces and intelligence services, six each from Central African Republic and South Sudan, five from Mali, four from Somalia, three from Sudan, one each from Iraq and Myanmar, and Boko Haram which operates in several countries.”As a general trend,” Guterres said, “the rise or resurgence of conflict and violent extremism, with its ensuing proliferation of arms, mass displacement, and collapsed rule of law, triggers patterns of sexual violence.”This was evident in many places in 2017 as insecurity spread to new regions in Central African Republic, violence surged in eastern and central Congo, conflict engulfed South Sudan, violence wracked Syria and Yemen, and “‘ethnic cleansing’ in the guise of clearance operations unfolded in Northern Rakhine State, Myanmar,” he said.Guterres said most victims are “politically and economically marginalized women and girls” concentrated in remote, rural areas with the least access to services that can help them, and in refugee camps and areas for the displaced.The year 2017 “also saw sexual violence continue to be employed as a tactic of war, terrorism, torture and repression,” he said, citing conflicts in CAR, Congo, Iraq, Mali, Myanmar, Nigeria, Somalia and South Sudan as examples of “this alarming trend.”Guterres said sexual violence continues to serve as a “push factor” for forced displacement in places such as Colombia, Iraq, the Horn of Africa and Syria. And he said it remained “a heightened risk in transit, refugee and displacement settings.”The secretary-general said the effects of sexual violence can impact generations as a result of trauma, stigma, poverty, poor health and unwanted pregnancy.In South Sudan, for instance, Guterres said sexual violence is so prevalent that a Commission of Inquiry described women and girls as “collectively traumatized.” He said children born of this violence have been labeled “bad blood” or “children of the enemy” and warned that this vulnerability “may leave them susceptible to recruitment, radicalization and trafficking.”Guterres said many women, including Rohingya refugees, are reluctant to return to locations they fled where forces including alleged perpetrators remain in control.”Colombia is the only country in which children conceived through wartime rape are legally recognized as victims, though it has been difficult for them to access redress without being stigmatized,” he said.The secretary-general lamented that “most incidents of mass rape continue to be met with mass impunity.”For example, Guterres said, not a single member of the Islamic State extremist group or Boko Haram “has been prosecuted for sexual violence offenses to date.”last_img read more

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Myanmar court indicts Reuters reporters

first_imgDetained Reuters journalist Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo sit beside police officers as they leave Insein court in Yangon, Myanmar on 9 July 2018. — ReutersA court in Myanmar on Monday charged two jailed Reuters journalists with obtaining secret state documents, moving the landmark press freedom case into its trial stage after six months of preliminary hearings.Yangon district judge Ye Lwin charged reporters Wa Lone, 32, and Kyaw Soe Oo, 28, with breaching the colonial-era Official Secrets Act, which carries a maximum penalty of 14 years in prison.Both journalists pleaded “not guilty” to the charges, telling the judge they had “followed journalistic ethics”.Speaking to reporters after the ruling, Wa Lone said he and Kyaw Soe Oo had committed no crime and would testify to their innocence in court.“Although we are charged, we are not guilty,” he said, in handcuffs, as officials ushered him into a police truck. “We will not retreat, give up or be shaken by this.”Chief prosecutor Kyaw Min Aung left the courthouse before reporters were able to ask him questions.The case has attracted global attention. Some Western diplomats and rights groups say it is a test of progress toward full democracy under the administration of Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi in a country where the military still wields considerable influence.The United States embassy in Yangon said it was “deeply disappointed” by the court’s decision.“‎The Myanmar authorities should allow the journalists to return to their jobs and families,” it said in a post on Facebook. “Today’s decision is a setback for press freedom and the rule of law in Myanmar.”Reuters President and Editor-in-Chief Stephen J. Adler called the case against the reporters “baseless”.“These Reuters journalists were doing their jobs in an independent and impartial way, and there are no facts or evidence to suggest that they’ve done anything wrong or broken any law,” he said in a statement.Myanmar government spokesman Zaw Htay did not answer calls seeking comment after the court ruling on Monday. He has declined to comment throughout the proceedings, saying Myanmar’s courts are independent and the case would be conducted according to the law.TRIAL PHASEThe reporters’ families, including Kyaw Soe Oo’s two-year-old daughter and Wa Lone’s pregnant wife, sat close to them in the courtroom packed with diplomats and journalists.The judge said the court had filed charges against both reporters under section 3.1 (c) of the act to probe the prosecution’s allegations that they collected and obtained secret documents pertaining to the security forces with the intention to harm national security.The case was adjourned until July 16.Proceedings will now enter the trial phase. Defense lawyers will summon witnesses before the judge, who will then deliver a verdict in a process likely to take several weeks, according to legal experts.Defense lawyer Khin Maung Zaw said both reporters would be called to testify as witnesses at the next hearing.“Naturally, I’m not satisfied…not happy,” he told reporters when asked about the court’s decision. “But I’m not losing hope. In the end we will have a happy ending.”Earlier this month, defense lawyers said the journalists were arrested in a sting operation by the police that was aimed at interfering with their reporting.At the same July 2 hearing, prosecutor Kyaw Min Aung said documents they had in their hands when they were arrested detailed the movements of security forces, while further documents found on their mobile phones ranged from confidential to top secret.At the time of their arrest in December, the reporters had been working on an investigation into the killing of 10 Rohingya Muslim men and boys in a village in western Myanmar’s Rakhine State. The killings took place during a military crackdown that United Nations agencies say led to more than 700,000 Rohingya fleeing to neighboring Bangladesh.The reporters have told relatives they were arrested almost immediately after being handed some rolled up papers at a restaurant in northern Yangon by two policemen they had not met before.In April, Police Captain Moe Yan Naing testified that a senior officer had ordered his subordinates to plant secret documents on Wa Lone to “trap” the reporter.After his court appearance, Moe Yan Naing was sentenced to a year in jail for violating police discipline by having spoken to Wa Lone, and his family was evicted from police housing. Police have said the eviction and his sentencing were not related to his testimony.last_img read more

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Tonight AFROs First Edition with Sean Yoes Monday June 13

first_imgListen at WEAA Live Stream:http://amber.streamguys.com.4020/live.m3u We’ll discuss national politics, with a focus on the unfortunate politics connected to the tragic massacre of 49 people in Orlando, Florida over the weekend, with political commentators Catalina Byrd and Sean Breeze. Plus, a report on the burgeoning backlog of Maryland psychiatric patients in Maryland’s prison and jail system. These stories and much more coming up on AFRO’s First Edition with Sean Yoes.last_img

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