Koscielny hails Arsenal’s fighting spirit

first_imgArsenal captain Laurent Koscielny revelled in winning a Premier League six-pointer against rivals Chelsea at Emirates Stadium.Koscielny completed the scoring in a rousing 2-0 win with his first goal since suffering a ruptured Achilles tendon last May.But the truly impressive element of a victory that brought the Gunners to within three points of their opponents in the final Champions League qualification spot was tireless collective effort – something the former France defender welcomed seven days on from a lacklustre defeat at West Ham Article continues below Editors’ Picks ‘There is no creativity’ – Can Solskjaer get Man Utd scoring freely again? ‘Everyone legged it on to the pitch!’ – How Foden went from Man City superfan to future superstar Emery out of jail – for now – as brilliant Pepe papers over Arsenal’s cracks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? “Today we needed to win. We did a mistake last week and it was a game of six points,” Koscielny told BT Sport.”If we lose, it would be nine points; if we win just three points. We are still in the race for the top four.”It was important, the commitment was amazing from all the boys. We talked a lot and we showed on the pitch which way we want to go together.”It is good to play like this. We want to fight for each other.”When we talk about a clean sheets it is not just about the defenders. We showed everyone working together; the strikers work and help the rest of the team. Then at the back it is easier to win the challenges.”It is good for our head – we can keep this [mentality] for the rest of the season.”Alexandre Lacazette scored a superb 14th-minute opener for Arsenal, deftly engineering space in the box to beat Kepa Arrizabalaga at his near post.”This is what the coach asked us to do in the dressing room – [press] from in front. We worked, we fought all the game,” he told BT Sport.”We are now three points to Chelsea so we are still in the race and we will fight until the end.”Koscielny’s goal – an attempted header than spun in off his shoulder – was not so easy on the eye but every bit as valuable.”I did my work in the gym,” he joked.”We know a free-kick or a corner is always important in modern football, the small details. I’m happy to score.” Check out Goal’s Premier League 2019-20 fantasy football podcast for game tips, debate and rivalries.last_img read more

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RRSPs one of the last gasps of the Louis St Laurent government

by Dan Healing, The Canadian Press Posted Feb 13, 2017 8:00 am MDT Last Updated Feb 13, 2017 at 8:40 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email RRSPs one of the last gasps of the Louis St. Laurent government 60 years ago CALGARY – When Walter Harris rose in the House of Commons on March 14, 1957, the Liberal finance minister could not have known that the budget speech he was about to read would be one of the last gasps of the Louis St. Laurent government.The Liberals would be swept aside within months by John Diefenbaker and the Conservatives, but a program introduced in that budget, the registered retirement savings plan or RRSP, would live on.In his speech, Harris pointed out that employees who were fortunate enough to work for companies that contributed to pension plans didn’t have to pay tax on those contributions until they were withdrawn after retirement.“It is now proposed to introduce a general policy of allowing tax postponement on limited amounts of earned income set aside for retirement by any taxpayer, whether an employee or not,” he declared.He later added he was worried about the effect RRSPs would have on tax revenues, predicting widespread use could cost the government as much as $40 million per year.He needn’t have worried. Records are unclear for 1957, but the Canada Revenue Agency says taxpayers deducted only $19 million for RRSP contributions in 1958, versus $259 million deducted through company pension plans.But RRSPs have grown in the 60 years since their introduction.Statistics Canada reported just under six million people or about 23 per cent of tax filers contributed a total of some $38.6 billion to RRSPs in 2014.“When it was first introduced, from 1957 up to 1968, it was very, very restrictive,” said Curtis Davis, director of tax and estate planning at Mackenzie Investments in Toronto.“It was the responsibility of the taxpayer to track their own limit and make contributions. And if you didn’t use it, you lost it. There was no carry-forward at that time.”Canadian workers were allowed initially to contribute up to 10 per cent of the previous year’s income to a maximum of $2,500, with that limit reduced by contributions made through an employer pension plan. The 2017 limit is 18 per cent of the previous year’s income to a maximum of about $26,000.People were allowed to carry forward seven years worth of unused RRSP room starting in 1990. All carry-forward limits were removed in 1996.RRSPs were part of a post-war wave of initiatives designed to build the Canadian social safety net, says Elizabeth Shilton, a senior fellow at the Centre for Law in the Contemporary Workplace at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ont., who has written about the history of Canadian pension plans.“There was a lot of international pressure post-war for developed countries to build their welfare states … so (RRSPs) would have been viewed as a privatized form or a minimally interventionist form of providing that safety net,” said Stilton.“Tax incentives rather than public pensions at that point.”Old Age Security was introduced in 1952 and the Canada Pension Plan and Quebec Pension Plan came into being in 1966.Stilton said that while a majority of people did not have access to employer pension plans, RRSPs took a long time to catch on and, while contributions have increased over the years, “it’s never been a huge success.”“Programs that are built on tax deductions as an incentive, like the RRSP, are only of value to people who pay taxes, and they are of more value to people who pay taxes at a higher rate,” she said.Davis said RRSPs now compete with the tax-free savings account or TFSA introduced in 2009, which is attractive to investors because it is a much more flexible way to grow investments.Follow @HealingSlowly on Twitter. read more

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