Japan GP qualifying pushed to Sunday as F1 cancels all Saturday running due to Typhoon Hagibis

first_imgJapan GP qualifying pushed to Sunday as F1 cancels all Saturday running due to Typhoon HagibisJapan GP 2019: While the final practice session on Saturday has been cancelled, the qualifying race has been pushed to Sunday and will take place 4 hours before the race. advertisement Reuters TokyoOctober 11, 2019UPDATED: October 11, 2019 09:38 IST F1 Japan GP: The final practice session scheduled for Saturday will not be held (Reuters Photo)HIGHLIGHTSJapan GP qualifying postponed to Sunday Decision taken keeping in mind the approach of Typhoon Hagibis3rd practice session cancelled, race to start at scheduled time on SundayOrganisers of Japan’s Formula One Grand Prix have cancelled all practice and qualifying sessions scheduled for Saturday due to the approach of Typhoon Hagibis.Originally scheduled to take place at 3 p.m. on Saturday (0600 GMT), the hour-long qualifying session that decides the grid order for the race will now be held at 10 a.m. (0100 GMT) on Sunday, a revised schedule issued by organisers showed.The final practice session, which would normally take place before qualifying, will not be held. The race will go ahead as planned at 2:10 p.m. (0510 GMT) on Sunday.Formula One’s governing body, the FIA, said it agreed with the decision taken by the race promoters and the Japanese Automobile Federation (JAF).”FIA and Formula One support this decision in the interest of safety for the spectators, competitors and everyone at the Suzuka Circuit,” it said in a statement.The circuit would be closed to the public and the media on Saturday, it added.Typhoon Hagibis, categorised as a ‘super-typhoon’, is predicted to be one of the most violent to hit the region in recent years and is expected to strike the Tokyo area this weekend.It has already forced the cancellation of two rugby World Cup matches.Formula One races at the Suzuka circuit, located about 300 kilometres to the southwest of Tokyo.The 2014 edition of the race was held in the wet with rain from the approaching Typhoon Phanfone drenching the track. An accident during the race caused the death of driver Jules Bianchi.Qualifying for the race in 2004 and 2010 was also postponed to Sunday due storms.advertisementAlso Read | Need to finish in top-10 by 2028 Olympics or else I’ll be a failure as Sports Minister: RijijuAlso See:For sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byAkshay Ramesh Tags :Follow Formula 1Follow Japan Grand PrixFollow Typhoon HagibisFollow F1 Japan GP Nextlast_img read more

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Magic Mushrooms warning as foragers told mild winter has led to abundance

“We haven’t really had a heavy frost yet which is what usually kills them off.”There is quite a lot of fungi lurking around, some have been late growing late because of the very hot and dry weather into later in the year.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Foragers have been warned of an abundance of magic mushrooms after the mild winter caused the psychedelic fungi to thrive.Specialists say the warmer weather means the psychedelic, naturally-occurring class-A drug has been found growing in large numbers across Staffordshire and Shropshire.John Hughes, a fungi expert at Shropshire Wildlife Trust, warned: “The longer the season, the greater the risk foragers could accidentally pick something hallucinogenic, so with the warmer winter this is definitely more of a risk this year than in previous years.“The key thing foragers should be aware of is not to pick anything you’re not sure what it is.“It is as simple as that, because there are many things out there which are toxic.”Usually, the fungi, found on grasslands and pastures grazed by sheep due to the nutrient-rich manure, are long gone by this time of year, but the mild and wet weather means they  have stuck around.Amateur mushroom enthusiasts have therefore been told to err on the side of caution.The mushrooms are illegal to possess, cultivate, transport or sell in the UK, but it is not an offence for them to be grown on your land as they live in the wild.Jane Traynor, from the Staffordshire Fungi Group, said: “Psilocybe semilanceata are quite common and you do find quite a lot of them around Staffordshire. read more

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