A New Favorite Has Emerged For The Country’s No. 2 RB

first_imgFans watch during the game between the Louisiana State University Tigers and the University of Louisiana-Lafatette Ragin' Cajuns at Tiger Stadium.BATON ROUGE, LA – SEPTEMBER 19: Fans watch during the game between the Louisiana State University Tigers and the University of Louisiana-Lafatette Ragin’ Cajuns at Tiger Stadium on September 19, 2009 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)The recent announcement by RB John Emery that he’d be decommitting from Georgia may quickly change the balance of power in the SEC’s 2019 recruiting cycle.247Sports writer Shea Dixon noted that the big blow for Georgia could be a huge gain for rival LSU.Per Dixon’s report, Emery visited LSU when they played the Bulldogs earlier this month.Emery, whom 247Sports gave a five-star rating and ranked as the No. 2 RB in the entire 2019 recruiting class, hails from the state of Louisiana, which would make the Tigers a natural landing spot.BREAKING: Louisiana 5-star RB John Emery has decommitted from Georgia less than three months after getting on board with the Bulldogs.This is huge news for #LSU and their push for a second RB. https://t.co/viVx8jJa4D pic.twitter.com/Q6bNR6DVZR— Shea Dixon (@Sheadixon) October 25, 2018LSU already has the commitment of four-star rated Tyrion Davis, also a Louisiana resident.Should they secure Emery as well, LSU would conceivably have the best pair of RBs in the SEC.The Tigers’ current starting RB, Nick Brossette, is a senior. His backup, sophomore Clyde Edwards-Hellaire, is currently on the injury report, but is averaging 5.0 yards per carry on the season.last_img read more

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Protecting people and planet from invisible killer is focus of UN health

Titled BreatheLife: Clean air. A healthy future, the campaign aims to mobilize cities and their inhabitants on issues of health and protecting the planet from the effects of air pollution. Moreover, By WHO and CCAC joining forces, ‘BreatheLife’ brings together expertise and partners that can tackle both the climate and health impacts of air pollution.According to WHO, air pollution kills nearly seven million people each year, nearly 12 per cent of deaths worldwide. It is responsible for 35 per cent of deaths due to lung disease, 27 per cent of deaths from heart disease, 34 per cent of deaths from stroke, and 36 per cent of deaths from lung cancer.Urban air pollution levels also tend to be higher in many low and middle-income cities and in poor neighbourhoods of high-income cities. This means reductions in pollutants can have particularly large health benefits for lower income groups as well as for children, elderly, and women, the agency explains.The campaign seeks to cut in half the number of deaths from air pollution by 2030 – the target year for the achievement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), adopted by the UN General Assembly in September 2015. ‘Breathe Life’ highlights the practical policies that cities can implement to improve the air quality through better housing, transport infrastructure, managements of waste and energy systems. It also educates individuals and communities about the measures they can take daily to achieve cleaner air, such as stopping the incineration of waste, development of green spaces and the choice of walking or cycling. Nine in ten people breathe air that is not safe. Air pollution is an invisible killer that we may face on a simple walk home or even in our homes. Improved vehicle standards, prioritization of clean public transport, and the adoption of stoves and more efficient alternative fuel for cooking, lighting and heating are also part of the actions put forward by the campaign the goal of saving more lives and protect the environment.For WHO and its partners, this series of measures to achieve a reduction of pollutants could significantly reduce the number of annual deaths from air pollution. read more

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