Palaeozoic to Mesozoic polyphase deformation of the Patuxent Range, Pensacola Mountains, Antarctica

first_imgThe Patuxent Range forms the most southerly third of the Pensacola Mountains, East Antarctica. Largely unstudied since the original geological survey work of the 1960s, the Patuxent Range was thought to expose metasediments deformed by a single Precambrian event. However, new structural data collected from two geographically separate areas in the central Patuxent Range reveal the presence of three distinct generations of structures. A synthesis of the regional geology together with new data suggests that the Patuxent Formation was mildly deformed during end Cambrian times as part of the late stage Ross Orogeny. However, the most intense deformation, although poorly constrained in age, probably occurred during the Permo-Triassic Gondwanian Orogeny. A third phase of deformation predates the intrusion of 183 Ma lamprophyre dykes and involved an inferred vertical axis rotation of the pre-existing D-1 and D-2 structures and the localized development of a spaced foliation and mesoscale folding. These D-3 structures may be the first evidence of an Early Jurassic deformation event in the Transantarctic Mountains, which correlates with the Peninsula and Rangitata I orogenies of the Antarctic Peninsula and New Zealand, respectively.last_img read more

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The Clam Bar Still Legendary in 45th Summer

first_imgBy Tim KellyIt’s a steamy, humid late afternoon in the Clam Bar parking lot. Nevertheless, things here are chill.Already there are way too many people crowding around the legendary Somers Point restaurant than could be squeezed into the 18-table main dining area and 20-seat clam bar itself. These folks are all here wanting…ok make that salivating…for the same thing. Great seafood at bargain prices.Windows are open and fans move the hot air around but do nothing to reduce the temperature, which is hovering not far south of triple digits.Patrice Popovich’s passion for the restaurant is obvious to her staff and their many loyal customers.Over the next few hours the sun over the bay will go down, and Ocean City’s skyline will light up. The crowds and waiting list will grow. And they just keep coming, and waiting, and enjoying the experience as much as the signature dishes.Welcome to The Clam Bar, also known as “Smitty’s.” It’s only the hottest cool place to eat at the Jersey Shore.“It’s great, here,” Customer Jonathan Golluber said. “The food is consistently great, and there is a common vibe among the staff and customers. It’s a really nice place to hang out and sit for a while.”As for the menu, he gave the highest recommendation to Smitty’s steamed clams.Now in its 45th year, the spartan facility earns raves from its legion of devotees even if the creature comforts aren’t there. These people care about creatures such as crabs, fish and mussels.Smitty’s customers know the drill. Come at peak times and expect to wait more than an hour. Embrace the wait and you’re liable to make a new friend or a business contact or just people-watch the beachgoers with sand between their toes, others dressed up for date night, and local professionals from office workers to employees at nearby Shore Medical Center. And everyone has the comfortable, confident air of being part of the scene.“Our customers are loyal and we do everything we can to give them what they want,” owner Patrice Popovich said. “Our staff is great. It really knows what it’s doing. I usually don’t have to say anything because the more experienced people make sure the newer ones understand expectations and how we do things.”The result is a kind of orderly chaos that keeps the tables turning over, the faces smiling and the crowds coming for the better part of a half century now. That is the part Popovich has some difficulty wrapping her head around.“We had a lady who always called before she came in to see if we had seafood Dijon on that night’s menu.  She ate seafood Dijon when she was pregnant right up until the night before she gave birth to an 11 pound baby. Well, the other night we celebrated the ‘baby’s’ 20th birthday – of course with seafood Dijon.”Photo Credit: Smitty’s FaceBook PageOn the afternoon and evening we visited the kitchen was a cacophony: a mix of shouted takeout orders, clanking dishes and glassware, laughter and paging announcements for customers whose wait had finally ended.Many of the wait staff, and kitchen workers have been with Popovich for years.“Honestly we are too busy to feel the heat,” said hostess Cathy Dalaino. “Everyone (of the employees) knows the system well.”Clams up! What looks like organized chaos results in exceptional serviceThe fine-honed routine turned Smitty’s Clam Bar into a Jersey Shore institution. The Clam Bar is a spartan restaurant. It has vinyl table cloths, unisex restrooms and no air conditioning. But nobody is complaining. They’re too busy enjoying the food, and the experience.Pete Popovich opened the business with his late partner Denis Dixon in 1973. Patrice started working there in 1974 while she was in college at Penn State, met Pete and the couple married.  The seafood magic has been happening at the historic Bay Avenue location ever since.Some of those waiting in the parking lots for their names to be called will put out beach chairs, crack open beers, and pop wine corks. It is for these patrons that Palma Matthews lives to serve. The so-called “Cup Woman” provides containers for beverages and corkscrews and bottle openers. But that’s just for starters.Palma Matthews of Northfield, Smitty’s ubiquitous “Cup Woman” in action and a look at her “utility belt.”“Anything anyone can need in this parking lot, I have,” she said proudly, displaying a tool belt filled with band-aids, breath mints, bug spray, wet naps and just about anything else a customer might need.“I have the best job in the world,” said Matthews, a hospice volunteer who lives in Northfield. “I am out in the sunshine and beautiful summer weather, I get to talk to all kinds of great people,” she said. “I hope I’m the cup woman for a long, long time.”Smitty’s is seasonal, opening each year on Mother’s Day weekend and staying open most years until the weekend after Labor Day. This year, with Labor Day arriving early, Patrice said the eatery will remain open until September 23.Neil DiCicco, Wife Carolyn, Deborah Subin and husband Ivan await their table at Smitty’s.Also this season, business has been slowed at times by the numerous rainy weekends and the recent hot muggy weather, but only slightly, Popovich said.“Our customers who wouldn’t normally come on a Saturday night (due to a prohibitive wait) will come when the weather is bad,” she said.But most nights, the place is packed. Renowned for its fried varieties, the baked casseroles such as seafood garlic, a combination mix of shrimp and scallops in a rich sauce, swordfish steak, and tuna bites also have a large following.A trip to Smittys is a family affair for Steve, Connie, Karen, Cecilia (on Karen’s Lap) Lillian (on Connie’s lap), and Mark.Part of the fun is one never knows what will be on the menu on a given night.   With everything fresh and different delicacies available at different times, the menu of regular items is small. Many customers forego the menus completely in favor of the specials which are listed on white boards throughout the building.That is not to say the menus aren’t special. Kids are encouraged to use provided crayons to create Smitty’s themed art while they wait, and the masterpieces are inserted into a plastic sleeve at the front of each menu. Artistic adults have also been known to contribute menu covers. If a kid comes across his or her menu on a return visit, the prize is a free desert.If the wait for a table is prohibitive, seats at the clam bar itself bring immediate service. As a result, competition for spots there can be spirited. The moment one of the barstool seats open up, it is quickly filled, and to the victor goes the spoils – the privilege to remove his or her name from the waiting list.Jonathan Gollubner of Abington PA with his maltipoo Luna.On our recent visit, a large family who gave their first names as Steve, Connie, Karen, Cecilia, Lillian and Mark were all there for one of this summer’s more popular items, potato skins stuffed with a combination of baked seafood.“We picked the right night because the skins are among the nightly specials,” Connie said.Jaclyn Roesch, a phys ed teacher and coach at Mainland High School and a resident of Northfield, was waiting for her table with sons Trent, 8, and Max, 7. She said she’s been coming to the Clam Bar for years and the boys have been since they were toddlers. She doesn’t mind waiting and her sons patiently amused themselves with chalk sidewalk drawings.Jaclyn Roesch with sons Max, 7 (left) and Trent 8 waiting to be called for their table.Max was quick to reel off his favorite seafood goodies: “Clams, shrimp and calamari,” he said, revealing a sophistication of palate unusual for an eight year old. Despite his tender age, Max showed that he was a true Smitty’s veteran.Popovich is returning the loyalty to help celebrate the restaurant’s 45th anniversary, with giveaways and surprises nightly. A certificate will be placed randomly under a napkin holder, and the person who finds it receives a T-shirt, hat or other prize. She also plans to raffle off a surfboard, with the proceeds going to scholarships for the Denis Dixon memorial scholarship fund.On weeknights, if you are lucky, the corn fritters with honey butter will be on the menu. They are a delicacy.Another Smitty’s staple is the clam chowder, both Manhattan and New England varieties, thick and loaded with clams. Fans who can’t decide between the two ask for “pink” chowder, a mixture of the two. When the restaurant heads into its last week of the season, many customers hoard the soup, and freeze it. Then at special times during the off-season, they will thaw and reheat it for a true taste of summer.“My tradition is save it until February and reheat a big serving when the Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition comes out,” a man said who asked we not use his name. “In the dead of winter I can warm my heart, soul and spirit.”Not a parking spot in sight.last_img read more

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News story: Rededication and burial services for first world war soldiers

Burial service for soldier of the first world warA burial service will be held in the morning of Tuesday 27 March at Bailleul Road East Cemetery, France for 1 soldier of the first world war.The remains of a soldier of the Royal Scots were discovered by a team of workmen near to Athiens. Given the location of where the remains were found it is a possibility that this soldier was killed during the Battle of Arras in April 1917. However there are still too many soldiers of the Royal Scots missing from that battle to identify this soldier.The service has been organised by the Joint Casualty and Compassionate Centre and will be attended by British Defence Staff, regimental representatives from The Royal Regiment of Scotland and local dignitaries. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission will be providing the headstone.Rededication service for Serjeant John MacKenzie MMA rededication service will be held in the afternoon of Tuesday 27 March at Anneux British Cemetery, France for Serjeant John Mackenzie MM.Serjeant John MacKenzie MM was just 21 years old when he died on 25 March 1918, a few days after the start of the German Spring Offensive. Having been wounded he was taken prisoner and died of his wounds in Inchy-en-Artois. Until recently the location of Serjeant MacKenzie’s grave remained unknown and he is commemorated on the Arras Memorial. However research has shown that he is in fact buried in Anneux British Cemetery.The service has been organised by the Joint Casualty and Compassionate Centre and will be attended by British Defence Staff, members of the family, regimental representatives from The Royal Regiment of Scotland and local dignitaries. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission will be providing the headstone.Burial service for soldiers of the first world warA burial service will be held on in the morning of Wednesday 28 March at Orchard Dump Cemetery, France, for soldiers of the first world war.The remains of two soldiers of the Royal Scots were discovered by a farmer near to Haisnes. The location of where the remains were found makes it possible that these soldiers were killed during the Battle of Loos in September 1915. However there are still too many soldiers of the Royal Scots missing from that battle to identify these soldiers.These 2 members of the Royal Scots will be buried alongside an unknown soldier of an unknown regiment. His remains were found by a farmer near to the former Hohenzollern Redoubt, a German defensive position which was fought over several times.The remains of a soldier of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders were discovered by a farmer in Cuinchy. Again, given the location of where the remains were found it is a possibility that this soldier was killed during the Battle of Loos in September 1915. However there are still too many soldiers of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders missing from that battle to identify this soldier.A burial service will be held on in the afternoon of Wednesday 28 March at Worburn Abbey Cemetery, France, for a soldier of the First World War.The services have been organised by the Joint Casualty and Compassionate Centre and will be attended by British Defence Staff, members of the family, regimental representatives from The Royal Regiment of Scotland and local dignitaries. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission will be providing the headstones. read more

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Press release: Jail for man who violently robbed victim in Norwich home

first_imgA man who drunkenly robbed a victim in his home, threatening him with a kitchen knife, has had his sentence increased after it was referred to the Court of Appeal for being too low.On 8 May 2017, Daniel Rushworth, 45, threatened to stab and ‘slice up’ the victim in his home with a large kitchen knife, holding it to his throat and hitting him over the head with its handle, breaking it.Rushworth and another man, who were drunk at the time, stole the victim’s mobile phone and tablet computer before demanding he give them money. The victim agreed to take them to the bank and, on the way, fortunately managed to escape and report the offence at the police station.In June, Rushworth was sentenced at Norwich Crown Court, where he received 2 years imprisonment suspended for 2 years. He was also required to undertake alcohol treatment and drug rehabilitation, as well as supervision. Today, after the hearing, the Court of Appeal sentenced him to 4 years 5 months immediate imprisonment.Speaking after the hearing, Attorney General Geoffrey Cox QC MP said:“Rushworth’s threatening and aggressive actions caused his victim both physical and emotional harm. I am satisfied that justice has now been done and seen to be done by those who have suffered at his hands.”last_img read more

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The road trip of a lifetime

first_img 15Jermont Haines (from left), Tukoya Boone, and Aaron Abdulmalik wear lab coats inside the Biology Labs at Harvard. Pictured in the background is Zion Edwards (from left), Tukoya Boone, Halle Bohner, and Bianca Nfonoyim ’15. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer 12Brendan Shea, the manager for American Repertory Theater’s Community Education and Community Programs, gives a behind-the-scenes tour of Harvard’s Tony Award-winning theater to show how professional artists and designers work with Harvard students to create their shows. Assistant Props Master Rebecca Helgeson works in the foreground as students pass by. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 14Mott Hall Bridges Academy students Aaron Abdulmalik (at microscope) and Jermont Haines learn about the uses of zebrafish. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer Scholars from Mott Hall Bridges Academy in Brooklyn, N.Y., were thrust in the spotlight when photographer Brandon Stanton, the founder of the popular blog “Humans of New York,” featured eighth-grader Vidal Chastanet describing his admiration for principal Nadia Lopez. The post went viral and a fundraiser was launched to bring the students on a tour of Harvard.The students arrived on the Harvard campus Thursday for a slate of activities built for them. In coordination with Harvard College Admissions and Financial Aid and Project TEACH, an early college-awareness program at Harvard that demystifies higher education and advocates that it is an affordable and attainable aspiration, the scholars got a sense of what college life is really like, exploring hands-on learning activities across campus, from the American Repertory Theater to the Harvard Museum of Natural History. 4Mott Hall Bridges Academy principal Nadia L. Lopez addresses the crowd. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 13Graduate School of Arts and Sciences student Tessa Montague (far left) shows Mott Hall Bridges Academy students Tukoya Boone (from left), Ashanti Taylor, and Sincere Cisco how zebrafish are used to research embryonic development inside the Biology Labs at Harvard. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer 17Kimberly Maddy (from left), Davon Barrett, and Kern Purchas take in a talk inside the Harvard Museum of Natural History. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer 6Photographer Brandon Stanton, the founder of the popular blog “Humans of New York,” listens to speakers during the welcoming ceremony inside the Harvard Art Museums. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 1Scholars from Mott Hall Bridges Academy arrive on the Harvard campus for a slate of activities built for them. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 9Students pack Agassiz Theater to hear Harvard College Dean Rakesh Khurana. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 7Scholars climb the stairs to Agassiz Theater to hear Harvard College Dean Rakesh Khurana speak. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 8Sixth-grader Kayla Speller listens to a talk by Harvard College Dean Rakesh Khurana. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 11Alice Hu ’18 leads a group of Mott Hall Bridges Academy scholars on a tour starting in Radcliffe Yard. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 5Harvard President Drew Faust welcomes the Mott Hall Bridges Academy students. Scholars raise their hands. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 2Scholars from Brooklyn’s Mott Hall Bridges Academy, including Lakiyah Berry (from left), Madelyne Martinez, and Aniesha King, arrive in the Harvard Art Museums’ Calderwood Courtyard. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 10Davon Mahki and Micah Witherspoon, sixth-graders from Mott Hall Bridges Academy, are pictured inside Agassiz Theater. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 18Kadeem Gilbert of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences gives a talk on plant-insect interactions to Mott Hall Bridges Academy students inside the Harvard Museum of Natural History. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer 3Inside the Harvard Art Museums’ Calderwood Courtyard, Jesus Moran ’16 (from left), Dominic Ferrante ’15, and Rabb Curatorial Fellow Chris Molinski welcome scholars from Brooklyn’s Mott Hall Bridges Academy. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 16Jermont Haines (from left), Tukoya Boone, and Aaron Abdulmalik get a lesson in zebrafish from Graduate School of Arts and Sciences student Tessa Montague. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographerlast_img read more

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Takeaways from legal filings for Trump’s impeachment trial

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — Legal briefs filed in the impeachment case against former President Donald Trump lay out radically different positions ahead of next week’s Senate trial. There are conflicting interpretations of his responsibility for the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol and in the legality of even holding a trial. There’s a debate over the role played by the First Amendment and an assessment by Democrats that the riot threatened the presidential line of succession. Trump’s lawyers say the case is moot since he is no longer in the White House and the Senate therefore doesn’t have jurisdiction to try him, but House impeachment managers say there’s ample precedent.last_img read more

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Dining hall monitors discuss theft in South Dining Hall

first_imgBeverly Skopec and her fellow monitors at South Dining Hall have seen a wide variety of things stolen from their workplace. Some of them stranger than others, Skopec said. “Mary Ann [Sobieralski, head monitor at South Dining Hall] saw some guys take a big dining hall table, and she called security and they said, ‘Oh, we were just borrowing it,’” Skopec said. “Well, they should’ve told us, then.”Dee Michael, a fellow monitor, said she believes hundreds of dollars are being wasted every year due to dining hall theft — an issue she said is at its worst since she began working at Notre Dame eight years ago. “I talked to a manager about it [Monday], and he said he has never — in all the time he’s been here — had to buy so many supplies,” Michael said. “Our glasses are going out the door — plates, silverware too — let alone the food. If you say anything to the kids and tell them the rule is they can only bring out one thing, they don’t pay any attention. I would think that there’s hundreds of dollars going out the door.” Stolen less often than dining-ware are tables, which have disappeared a couple times this year, Michael said. “This year we also had two tables stolen — they have the Notre Dame ID on it and were made by a worker that recently died,” she said. “One of the managers found one outside the doors, and the other one magically appeared after we posted a sign about it.”Chris Abayasinghe, senior director of Campus Dining, said in an email that Campus Dining has had to replace thousands of dollars in property due to theft each year.“At the end of each year, we have some of the plates/cups/silverware returned to the dining halls,” Abayasinghe said. “Last year, we replaced approximately $10,000 in plates/cups/silverware.”Skopec said she has had her own experiences with confronting students.“One day I was coming in to work, a student was walking past me and eating ice cream with one of the blue bowls and a spoon and I said to him, ‘Did you get that from the dining hall?’” she said. “I think it’s like a challenge to them, like to see if they can get away with it.”Michael notices theft every day — both of food and utensils and other property — and said she thinks if there wasn’t theft of this nature the price of each meal would go down. “The price of each meal went up this year to $18.50,” Michael said. “If everybody did that … that’s why the rates are so high for the meals, because they have to adjust somehow.”Abayasinghe said when students are caught stealing food or dining-ware, the policy is to talk to them about the hall’s policy. “At the beginning of every school year, and towards the end of each semester, we’ve encountered students removing plates, cups and silverware [and] on occasion, our students taking food out of the dining hall,” Abayasinghe said. “We do speak with our students to educate them on our policies with dining in the halls.”Skopec said concerning food, some of the monitors will not be as strict as others. “A couple of the ladies upstairs have said some nasty things to students, but most of us are not really tough about it — if you want to walk out with something, you probably can,” she said. “ … If they’re eating it in their hand, we just let them leave with it.”Michael said every day she sees many people attempting to steal, and she is unable to stop about a half dozen of them.“My feeling is they’re going to have to leave college and go into the real world,” Michael said. “Once they do that, aren’t they going to have to follow the rules?”Tags: Campus DIning, Dining Halls, South Dining Hall, theft, theft on campuslast_img read more

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Submarine Captains Play Key Roles In Mine Rescue

first_imgBy Dialogo November 04, 2010 So many Americans contributed to the success of this rescue. Good to hear one more story. I guess the USNA knows about their grad that helped to accomplish this miracle? Read Dialogo’s exclusive interview with Capt. Renato Navarro Genta here. They met in the high Chilean desert — an unlikely backdrop for two accomplished submarine captains. But that encounter at the San José copper-gold mine in the Atacama Desert near Copiapó played a major role in events that were about to unfold before a worldwide audience. Clint Cragg, a NASA engineer and the former captain of the USS Ohio, accompanied a team of doctors to the mine where 33 workers were trapped underground. The team traveled to Chile to provide advice on keeping the men physically and mentally healthy. Navarro and Cragg hit it off, and their relationship became the informal conduit that accelerated communication between NASA and the Chilean Navy. “It was through him that I met the Chilean Navy engineers on the site who were designing the capsule,” Cragg said. That’s the famous Fenix capsule that eventually brought all 33 miners to the surface. The Chileans initially asked NASA for medical and psychological assistance due to the agency’s experience in harsh environments. But Cragg’s bosses sent him along to see how else NASA might be able to help. Cragg found a perfect opportunity to share NASA’s engineering expertise after meeting Navarro and the Chilean engineering team. He briefed the Chilean Minister of Health on ways NASA could help with designing the capsule, and the Chileans accepted his proposal soon after he returned to his office at Langley. “I put together a team of engineers from almost every center around the agency,” Cragg said in an agency newsletter. “Over the course of three days we hammered out a 12- to 13-page list of requirements for the capsule and sent that to the Chilean Minister of Health.” He also sent a copy to his new friend Navarro. The NASA team offered about 50 suggested design features, Cragg said. One was that the capsule be built so a single miner could easily enter and secure himself. Another was that the cage be equipped with an oxygen tank. The team also suggested that the capsule design include technology to cut down on friction it might encounter while moving through the tunnel. The capsule performed almost flawlessly in front of a worldwide television audience last month. Cragg said he was thrilled to learn from one of the Chilean Navy commanders that they had incorporated most of the NASA suggestions into the design. Capt. Renato Navarro of the Chilean Navy, head of its submarine school, worked with another team to support the miners. The Chileans realized early on that submariners were naturally suited to offer guidance on long-term survival in confined spaces. At that early stage, plans to extricate the miners were in their infancy and the site was awash with people eager to help. That’s when the submariners met. “It was fortuitous, it wasn’t planned that way,” Cragg said. Cragg accompanied the health team, but his expertise as an engineer and sub commander soon came to the forefront. “It helped a lot because I had some credibility right from the beginning,” Cragg said. Cragg graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1978 and entered the submarine and naval nuclear power training program. He served aboard the USS Sand Lance, USS Trepang, USS Alabama, USS Tunny and, finally, as commanding officer of the USS Ohio. He also earned M.A. degrees in Strategic Studies and International Relations from the Naval War College. After completing four strategic deterrent patrols as commander of the Ohio, Cragg was assigned as the Chief of Current Operations, US European Command. While in Europe he participated in a number of operations, which included the wars in Kosovo, Afghanistan, and Iraq. Cragg had a chance encounter with an admiral as he was pondering his post-Navy career while stationed in Europe. “I had this two-star admiral I had to talk to every day. One day there was this one-star admiral out in the hall and we were shooting the breeze and he said, ‘try NASA, they do similar things to what we do now.’” It was a perfect fit. “The organization I am part of is the NASA Engineering and Safety Center, which was set up after the Columbia disaster,” Cragg said. “I like the job, it’s like the Navy in that every day is different.” Cragg has been thrust into the media spotlight since his role in the rescue came to light. “You know there are certain people who see a microphone and they fall in love it,” Cragg said. “I certainly am not. But I am certainly glad to highlight our strengths. I don’t mind doing it for NASA.” Cragg said his wife, Agatha, has been supportive and has “gone along with the flow” in recent weeks. He has three children, one in college, one in high school and one in elementary school. Submarine experience Engineering the capsule The submariners’ experience with confined space and isolation proved invaluable even though the San José mine is more than 100 miles from their deep blue home. “One of the things our psychologists pointed out was those miners needed some meaningful work,” Cragg said. “That’s the same thing we do on submarines. Everybody has to stand watch on a ship, you have training and drills.” Cragg said Navarro took a leadership role in making sure the miners had meaningful work. The miners ended up helping with their own rescue, moving the tons and tons of rock that fell into the mine while the rescue shaft was being drilled. Cragg said he was moved by all the naval references used during the rescue. “Even the Chilean president told the last miner out: ‘You are the captain of the ship.’ ” Clint Cragglast_img read more

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NCC Student Nabbed in Swastika Cases

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Jasskirat Saini, 20 of Plainview, was arrested for a spate of bias crimes at Nassau Community College.A Nassau Community College student dubbed a “miscreant” and a “bigot” by Nassau police’s top cop was arrested for a string of anti-Semitic graffiti at the college over the last two months.Police on Tuesday charged 20-year-old Jasskirat Saini of Plainview with multiple counts of aggravated harassment. He will be arraigned Wednesday at First District Court in Hempstead.Saini, according to police, was responsible for drawing swastikas inside various bathrooms at the college and tagging one such room with the words “Germany” and “Heil Hitler.”Anti-Semitic graffiti was discovered at the college on at least six different occasions from Oct. 15 until Dec. 16, police said.Saini allegedly told police the graffiti was in response to his feeling slighted by the Jewish community in Plainview.Acting-Nassau County Police Commissioner Thomas Krumpter said at a press conference Tuesday evening that hate crimes directed at any community won’t be tolerated by the department.NCC President W. Hubert Keen in a statement said the college is “deeply saddened” the alleged perpetrator is a student, adding, “it reminds us that a zero-tolerance policy and a rigorous program of on-campus anti-bias programs must be reaffirmed every day.”Police continue to investigate two recent bias crimes in Mineola, including the discovery of swastikas etched in the snow outside one residence and the words “Make America White Again” and anti-Semitic imagery spray painted outside another.last_img read more

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